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Current Nanomaterials News and Events

Current Nanomaterials News and Events, Nanomaterials News Articles.
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Eco-friendly method for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles
Environmentally Friendly Way of Synthesizing Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Was Developed. (2019-09-16)
Scientists create a nanomaterial that is both twisted and untwisted at the same time
A new nanomaterial developed by scientists at the University of Bath could solve a conundrum faced by scientists probing some of the most promising types of future pharmaceuticals. (2019-09-13)
Enhancing materials for hi-res patterning to advance microelectronics
Scientists created organic-inorganic materials for transferring ultrasmall features into silicon with a high aspect ratio. (2019-08-27)
Artificial muscles bloom, dance, and wave
Researchers from KAIST have developed an ultrathin, artificial muscle for soft robotics. (2019-08-21)
Scaling up a nanoimmunotherapy for atherosclerosis through preclinical testing
By integrating translational imaging techniques with improvements to production methods, Tina Binderup and colleagues have scaled up a promising nanoimmunotherapy for atherosclerosis in mice, rabbits and pigs -- surmounting a major obstacle in nanomedicine. (2019-08-21)
Through the kidneys to the exit
Scientists at the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' (NUST MISIS) have identified a new mechanism for removing magnetic nanoparticles through the kidneys, which will help to create more effective and safe drugs. (2019-08-13)
Neural networks will help manufacture carbon nanotubes
A team of scientists from Skoltech's Laboratory of Nanomaterials proposed a neural-network-based method for monitoring the growth of carbon nanotubes, preparing the ground for a new generation of sophisticated electronic devices. (2019-08-08)
From Japanese basket weaving art to nanotechnology with ion beams
The properties of high-temperature superconductors can be tailored by the introduction of artificial defects. (2019-08-01)
Heterophase nanostructures contributing to efficient catalysis
In the research on phase engineering of noble metal nanomaterials, amorphous/crystalline heterophase nanostructures have exhibited some intriguing properties. (2019-08-01)
Vitamin C is key to protection of exciting new nanomaterial
In work that could open a floodgate of future applications for a new class of nanomaterials known as MXenes (pronounced 'Maxines'), researchers from Texas A&M University have discovered a simple, inexpensive way to prevent the materials' rapid degradation. (2019-07-09)
Bionic catalysts to produce clean energy
A biohybrid material that combines reduced graphene oxide with bacterial cells offers an eco-friendly option to help store renewable energy. (2019-07-02)
Researchers design superhydrophobic 'nanoflower' for biomedical applications
Plant leaves have a natural superpower -- they're designed with water repelling characteristics. (2019-07-02)
Ultrasmall nanoclusters and carbon quantum dots show promise for acute kidney injury
Acute kidney injury (AKI) often complicates the treatment outcomes of hospitalized patients, resulting in dangerous levels of toxic chemicals accumulating in the blood and causing numerous deaths annually. (2019-06-25)
Researchers from IKBFU study nanoparticles synthesized by method of electric explosion
Physicists from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University conduct a study on nanomaterials that have been synthesized by the method of the electric explosion. (2019-06-17)
Hybrid nanostructure steps up light-harvesting efficiency
Energy is transferred through the structure in a way that boosts its response to light, showing promise for solar cell applications. (2019-06-12)
Proof of sandwiched graphene-membrane superstructure opens up a membrane-specific drug delivery mode
Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Tsinghua University (THU) proved a sandwiched superstructure for graphene oxide (GO) that transport inside cell membranes for the first time. (2019-06-07)
Nanomaterial safety on a nano budget
A Rice University laboratory develops and shares a low-cost method to safely handle the transfer of bulk carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials. (2019-06-03)
Nanoscale sculpturing leads to unusual packing of nanocubes
Brookhaven and Columbia scientists found that cubic nanoparticles surrounded by thick DNA shells pack in a never-before-seen 'zigzag' pattern. (2019-05-17)
Scientists discover a new class of single-atom nanozymes
A research team led by Prof. DONG Shaojun from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a new class of single-atom nanozymes, which integrates state-of-the-art single-atom technology with intrinsic enzyme-like active sites. (2019-05-09)
Researchers create 'force field' for super materials
Researchers have developed a revolutionary method to intricately grow and protect some of the world's most exciting nanomaterials -- graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNT). (2019-05-09)
Nanomaterials mimicking natural enzymes with superior catalytic activity and selectivity
A KAIST research team doped nitrogen and boron into graphene to selectively increase peroxidase-like activity and succeeded in synthesizing a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with a low cost and superior catalytic activity. (2019-04-30)
New fiber-shaped supercapacitor for wearable electronics
A novel family of amphiphilic core-sheath structured CNT composited fiber, i.e., CNT-gold@hydrophilic CNT-polyaniline (CNT-Au@OCNT-PANI) with excellent electrochemical properties for wearable electronics was explored by Huisheng Peng et al. in Science China Materials. (2019-04-18)
New tunable nanomaterials possible due to flexible process invented by Bath physicists
Physicists at the University of Bath have developed a flexible process allowing the synthesis in a single flow of a wide range of novel nanomaterials with various morphologies, with potential applications in areas including optics and sensors. (2019-04-11)
Nanomaterials give plants 'super' abilities (video)
Science-fiction writers have long envisioned human-machine hybrids that wield extraordinary powers. (2019-04-03)
Nanovaccine boosts immunity in sufferers of metabolic syndrome
A new class of biomaterial developed by Cornell researchers for an infectious disease nanovaccine effectively boosted immunity in mice with metabolic disorders linked to gut bacteria - a population that shows resistance to traditional flu and polio vaccines. (2019-03-28)
New material will allow abandoning bone marrow transplantation
Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' developed nanomaterial, which will be able to restore the internal structure of bones damaged due to osteoporosis and osteomyelitis. (2019-03-19)
Making xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from paper paste
The ecological bio-production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from material produced by the paper industry has been achieved by a Japanese research team. (2019-03-19)
Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from the China University of Petroleum (East China) have summarized the recent advances in application of 2D nanomaterials on the electrode materials of lithium-ion batteries, owing to their compelling electrochemical and mechanical properties that make them good candidates as electrodes in lit-ion batteries for high capacity and long cycle life. (2019-03-14)
New technology accelerates the science of deceleration
While it's not a case of reinventing the wheel, researchers are looking at ways to improve standard braking equipment on trains and cars. (2019-03-13)
Directed evolution builds nanoparticles
Directed evolution is a powerful technique for engineering proteins. EPFL scientists now show that it can also be used to engineer synthetic nanoparticles as optical biosensors, which are used widely in biology, drug development, and even medical diagnostics such as real-time monitoring of glucose. (2019-02-27)
New paper provides design principles for disease-sensing nanomaterials
A newly published paper from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York, Brooklyn College, and Hunter College, outlines novel design guidance that could rapidly advance development of disease-sensing nanomaterials for use in new drug development. (2019-02-21)
BFU scientists developed tungsten-based hydrogen detectors
A team of physicists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University together with their colleagues from National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (NRNU MEPhI) developed a tungsten oxide-based detector of hydrogen in gas mixes. (2019-02-11)
Scientists develop metal-free photocatalyst to purify pathogen-rich water in minutes
Scientists across the world have been racking their brains to solve the global problem of clean water scarcity. (2019-02-07)
Estimation of technology level required for low-cost renewable hydrogen production
NIMS, the University of Tokyo and Hiroshima University jointly evaluated the economic efficiency of hydrogen production systems combining photovoltaic power generation and rechargeable batteries and estimated technology levels necessary for the systems to produce hydrogen at a globally competitive cost. (2019-01-31)
NUS study: Nanoparticles may promote cancer metastasis
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have found that cancer nanomedicine, which are designed to kill cancer cells, may accelerate metastasis. (2019-01-31)
A first: Cornell researchers quantify photocurrent loss in particle interface
With a growing global population will come increased energy consumption, and sustainable forms of energy sources such as solar fuels and solar electricity will be in even greater demand. (2019-01-30)
Aerosol-assisted biosynthesis strategy enables functional bulk nanocomposites
researchers led by Professor YU Shu-Hong from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) developed a general and scalable biosynthesis strategy, which involves simultaneous growth of cellulose nanofibrils through microbial fermentation and co-deposition of various kinds of nanoscale building blocks (NBBs) through aerosol feeding (intermittent spray of liquid nutrients and NBBs suspension) on solid culture substrates. (2019-01-28)
Self-assembling nanomaterial offers pathway to more efficient, affordable harnessing of solar power
New nanomaterials developed by researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY) could provide a pathway to more efficient and potentially affordable harvesting of solar energy. (2019-01-24)
NUS engineers develop novel strategy for designing tiny semiconductor particles for wide-ranging applications
NUS Engineers have developed a cost-effective and scalable strategy for designing tiny semiconductor particles known as transition metal dichalcogenide quantum dots (TMD QDs) which can potentially generate cancer-killing properties. (2019-01-24)
Researchers find new ways to harness wasted methane
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) presented new ways to harness wasted methane. (2019-01-18)
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