Current Nanowires News and Events

Current Nanowires News and Events, Nanowires News Articles.
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Electronic skin has a strong future stretching ahead
Soft, stretchy, slimline and strong electronics could accelerate the arrival of artificial skin. (2020-11-27)

Sheer protection from electromagnetic radiation
A printable ink that is both conductive and transparent can also block radio waves. (2020-11-01)

Plant-based spray could be used in n95 masks and energy devices
Engineers have invented a way to spray extremely thin wires made of a plant-based material that could be used in N95 mask filters, devices that harvest energy for electricity, and potentially the creation of human organs. The method involves spraying methylcellulose, a renewable plastic material derived from plant cellulose, on 3D-printed and other objects ranging from electronics to plants, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Horizons. (2020-10-07)

Researchers discover effective pathway to convert CO2 into ethylene
The scientists developed nanoscale copper wires with specially shaped surfaces to catalyze a chemical reaction that reduces greenhouse gas emissions while generating ethylene -- a valuable chemical simultaneously. (2020-09-16)

Boundaries no barrier for thermoelectricity
Rice University researchers show how thermoelectricity hurdles some defects, but not others, in gold nanowires. The discovery has implications for making better thin-film electronic devices. (2020-09-08)

Shock to bacteria activates nature's electrical grid
The ocean floor and the ground beneath our feet are riddled with tiny nanowires -- 1/100,000th the width of a human hair -- created by billions of bacteria that can generate electric currents from organic waste. In new research published Aug. 17 in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, Yale researchers describe how this hidden power grid could be activated with a short jolt of electric field. (2020-08-17)

A titanate nanowire mask that can eliminate pathogens
Researchers in Lásló Forró's lab at EPFL, Switzerland, are working on a membrane made of titanium oxide nanowires, similar in appearance to filter paper but with antibacterial and antiviral properties. Their material works by using the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide: when exposed to ultraviolet radiation, the fibers convert resident moisture into oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, which have the ability to destroy pathogens. (2020-08-07)

Transforming e-waste into a strong, protective coating for metal
A typical recycling process converts large quantities of items made of a single material into more of the same. However, this approach isn't feasible for old electronic devices, or ''e-waste,'' because they contain small amounts of many different materials that cannot be readily separated. Now, in ACS Omega, researchers report a selective, small-scale microrecycling strategy, which they use to convert old printed circuit boards and monitor components into a new type of strong metal coating. (2020-07-29)

The lightest shielding material in the world
Empa researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range - and they are unrivalled in terms of weight. (2020-07-02)

HKUST scientists develop world's first spherical artificial eye with 3D retina
An international team led by HKUST scientists has developed the world's first 3D artificial eye with capabilities better than existing bionic eyes and in some cases, even exceed those of the human eyes, bringing vision to humanoid robots and new hope to patients with visual impairment. (2020-06-10)

New discovery advances optical microscopy
New Illinois ECE research is advancing the field of optical microscopy, giving the field a critical new tool to solve challenging problems across many fields of science and engineering including semiconductor wafer inspection, nanoparticle sensing, material characterization, biosensing, virus counting, and microfluidic monitoring. (2020-06-05)

Flow-through electrodes make hydrogen 50 times faster
Duke chemists tested three new materials as a porous, flow-through electrode to make hydrogen from electrolysis. Their goal was to increase the surface area of the electrode for reactions, while avoiding trapping the gas bubbles that are produced. Making hydrogen cheaply from electricity could be key to affordably storing the overproduction of power from renewable sources like wind and solar. (2020-05-26)

Iron nanorobots go undercover
Customizable magnetic iron nanowires pinpoint and track the movements of target cells. (2020-05-20)

A new, highly sensitive chemical sensor uses protein nanowires
Writing in NanoResearch, a team at UMass Amherst reports that they have developed bioelectronic ammonia gas sensors that are among the most sensitive ever made. It uses electric-charge-conducting protein nanowires derived from the bacterium Geobacter to provide biomaterials for electrical devices. They grow hair-like protein filaments that work as nanoscale ''wires'' to transfer charges for their nourishment and to communicate with other bacteria. (2020-05-13)

KIST develops large-scale stretchable and transparent electrodes
A Korean research team has developed a large-scale stretchable and transparent electrode for the stretchable display. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team has developed a technology to fabricate a large-area wavy silver nanowire network electrode that is structurally stretchable with a high degree of conductivity and transparency. (2020-05-06)

Real-time visualization of solid-phase ion migration
Researchers from University of science and technology of China has shed new lights on the topic of solid-phase ion migration. Researchers demonstrated a unique in-situ strategy for visualizing the dynamic solid-phase ion migration between nanostructures with nanogap at the atomic scale. The research article entitled ''Real-Time Visualization of Solid-Phase Ion Migration Kinetics on Nanowire Monolayer'' was published in Journal of the American Chemical Society on April 29th. (2020-05-06)

Tiny devices promise new horizon for security screening and medical imaging
Miniature devices that could be developed into safe, high-resolution imaging technology, with uses such as helping doctors identify potentially deadly cancers and treat them early, have been created in research involving the University of Strathclyde. (2020-05-06)

'Breathable' electronics pave the way for more functional wearable tech
Engineering researchers have created ultrathin, stretchable electronic material that is gas permeable, allowing the material to 'breathe.' The material was designed specifically for use in biomedical or wearable technologies, since the gas permeability allows sweat and volatile organic compounds to evaporate away from the skin, making it more comfortable for users -- especially for long-term wear. (2020-04-30)

FSU researchers discover new structure for promising class of materials
Florida State researchers have published a new study in the journal Science Advances that explains how they created a hollow nanostructure for metal halide perovskites that would allow the material to emit a highly efficient blue light. (2020-04-24)

Quantum research unifies two ideas offering an alternative route to topological superconductivity
Researchers from University of Copenhagen have discovered a new way of developing topological superconductivity that may provide a useful route toward the use of Majorana zero modes as the foundation of qubits for quantum information. (2020-04-22)

Researchers unveil electronics that mimic the human brain in efficient learning
Only 10 years ago, scientists working on what they hoped would open a new frontier of neuromorphic computing could only dream of a device using miniature tools called memristors that would function/operate like real brain synapses. But now a team at UMass Amherst has discovered, while on their way to better understanding protein nanowires, how to use these biological, electricity conducting filaments to make a neuromorphic memristor, or 'memory transistor,' device. (2020-04-20)

Making big data processing more energy efficient using magnetic circuits
New research finds that magnetic wires, spaced a certain way, can lead to a 20-30x reduction in the amount of energy needed to run neural network training algorithms. (2020-04-13)

Eindhoven researchers present revolutionary light-emitting silicon
Emitting light from silicon has been the 'Holy Grail' in the microelectronics industry for decades. Solving this puzzle would revolutionize computing, as chips will become faster than ever. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology now succeeded: they have developed an alloy with silicon that can emit light. The results have been published in the journal Nature. The team will now start creating a silicon laser to be integrated into current chips. (2020-04-08)

On Mars or Earth, biohybrid can turn carbon dioxide into new products
UC Berkeley chemists have created a hybrid system of bacteria and nanowires that captures energy from sunlight and transfers it to the bacteria to turn carbon dioxide and water into organic molecules and oxygen. On Earth, such a biohybrid could remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. On Mars, it would provide colonists with raw material to manufacture organic compounds ranging from fuels to drugs. The efficiency is greater than the photosynthetic efficiency of most plants. (2020-03-31)

Heterostructure and Q-factor engineering for low-threshold and persistent nanowire lasing
Semiconductor nanowire lasers are a crucial component for on-chip integrated optoelectronics. However, silicon-integrated, room-temperature, continuously-operating and electrically-pumped nanowire lasers have not yet been demonstrated. In this work, a method to achieve low-threshold quasi-four-level lasing using indirect-to-direct band scattering is shown. This is enabled by the use of a high-Q cavity, and - using a time-gated interferometry technique - the end-facet reflectivity is directly measured for the first time (2020-03-19)

On-chip single-mode CdS nanowire laser
In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the integration of active nanowires with on-chip planar waveguides for on-chip light sources. Towards this goal, scientists in China demonstrated a highly compact on-chip single-mode cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanowire laser, by integrating a free-standing CdS nanowire onto a silicon nitride (SiN) photonic chip. The on-chip integration scheme will offer new opportunities for both nanowire photonic devices and on-chip light sources. (2020-03-19)

Semiconductors can behave like metals and even like superconductors
The crystal structure at the surface of semiconductor materials can make them behave like metals and even like superconductors, a joint Swansea/Rostock research team has shown. The discovery potentially opens the door to advances like more energy-efficient electronic devices. (2020-03-17)

New green technology from UMass Amherst generates electricity 'out of thin air'
As reported today in Nature, the laboratories of electrical engineer Jun Yao and microbiologist Derek Lovley at UMass Amherst have created a device they call an 'Air-gen.' or air-powered generator, with electrically conductive protein nanowires produced by the microbe Geobacter. The Air-gen connects electrodes to the protein nanowires in such a way that electrical current is generated from the water vapor naturally present in the atmosphere. (2020-02-17)

Quantum technologies: New insights into superconducting processes
Superconductors are regarded as promising components for quantum computers, but so far they only function at very low temperatures. Scientists at Münster University (Germany) now demonstrated a so-called energy quantization in nanowires of high-temperature superconductors. The study has been published in the journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-02-10)

DNA-like material could bring even smaller transistors
A material shaped like a one-dimensional DNA helix might further push the limits on a transistor's size. The material comes from a rare earth element called tellurium. (2020-02-10)

Rare-earth element material could produce world's smallest transistors
A material from a rare earth element, tellurium, could produce the world's smallest transistor, thanks to an Army-funded project. (2020-02-10)

New threads: Nanowires made of tellurium and nanotubes hold promise for wearable tech
Wearable tech requires both strength and flexibility. A new nanowire design -- a boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) filled with tellurium atomic chains -- holds promise for electronics triggered by light and pressure. In collaboration with Purdue University, Washington University and University of Texas at Dallas, Michigan Tech physicists created and tested the new nanowire alongside carbon nanotubes. (2020-02-10)

Iron nanorobots show their true mettle
Multifunctional iron nanowires selectively obliterate cancer cells with a triple-punch combination attack. (2020-01-28)

Tiny magnetic structures enhance medical science
Magnetic nanostructures have interesting properties that enhance novel applications in medical diagnosis and allow the exploration of new therapeutic techniques. (2020-01-28)

Engineers develop 'chameleon metals' that change surfaces in response to heat
Martin Thuo and his research group have found a way to use heat to predictably and precisely change the surface structure of a particle of liquid metal. It's like a chameleon changing skin color in response to its environment. And so Thuo and his team are calling the technology 'chameleon metals.' (2020-01-13)

Brain-like functions emerging in a metallic nanowire network
An international joint research team led by NIMS succeeded in fabricating a neuromorphic network composed of numerous metallic nanowires. Using this network, the team was able to generate electrical characteristics similar to those associated with higher order brain functions unique to humans, such as memorization, learning, forgetting, becoming alert and returning to calm. The team then clarified the mechanisms that induced these electrical characteristics. (2019-12-25)

Counting photons is now routine enough to need standards
NIST has taken a step toward enabling universal standards for single-photon detectors (SPDs), which are becoming increasingly important in science and industry. (2019-12-20)

Properties of graphene change due to water and oxygen
Professor Sunmin Ryu and his research team investigated the oxidation-reduction principle of two-dimensional materials by interfacial diffusion. (2019-12-04)

Atomic-scale imaging of defect dynamics under heating by in situ Cs-corrected TEM
Formation and atomic process of the defects of ceria nanowires was studied under heating by using in situ Cs-TEM. With the temperature elevating, ceria nanowires are reduced and defects grow up. At 1023K, the defects with rhombus or hexagon patterns are surrounded by {111} and {200} planes, and the heated ceria maintain the same cubic fluorite structure as their parent. The defects originate from the release of lattice oxygen and surface Ce ions. (2019-11-28)

Hourglass-shaped silicon nanowire photodiodes with increased absorption of light developed
The research team led by Professor Chang-Ki Baek proposed vertical silicone nanowires with high sensitivity by using silicone and semiconductor process. (2019-11-26)

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