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Current Natural selection News and Events

Current Natural selection News and Events, Natural selection News Articles.
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Genetics to feed the world
A study, published in Nature Genetics, demonstrated the effectiveness of the technology known as genomic selection in a wheat improvement program. (2019-10-15)
Sperm and egg cell 'immune response' protects koala DNA
Discovery of a type of immunity that protects koalas' DNA from viruses has importance for the survival of koalas and our fundamental understanding of evolution. (2019-10-14)
Influenza evolution patterns change with time, complicating vaccine design
Skoltech scientists discovered new patterns in the evolution of the influenza virus. (2019-10-08)
Understanding the genomic signature of coevolution
An international team of researchers including limnologists from the University of Konstanz shows that rapid genomic changes during antagonistic species interactions are shaped by the reciprocal effects of ecology and evolution. (2019-10-02)
Pineapple genome sequences hint at plant domestication in a single step
An international team led by University of Illinois Professor of Plant Biology Ray Ming published their analysis of the genome of the red pineapple, a plant grown for fiber production and as an ornamental. (2019-09-30)
Catching evolution in the act
Researchers have produced some of the first evidence that shows that artificial selection and natural selection act on the same genes, a hypothesis predicted by Charles Darwin in 1859. (2019-09-26)
Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence
Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did -- with implications for many fields, including artificial intelligence. (2019-09-20)
These pink sea urchins have teeth that sharpen themselves
Sea urchins have five teeth, each held by a separate jaw in a circular arrangement at the center of their spiked, spherical bodies. (2019-09-18)
Elephant seal 'supermoms' produce most of the population, study finds
Most of the pups born in an elephant seal colony in California over a span of five decades were produced by a relatively small number of long-lived 'supermoms,' according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz. (2019-09-17)
Statistical inference to mimic the operating manner of highly-experienced crystallographer
A research team from Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), RIKEN, and the University of Tokyo developed a novel data analysis method for prior evaluation of single crystal structure analysis. (2019-09-17)
The paradox of different house flies with few genetic differences
University of Houston evolutionary biologist Richard Meisel has published findings on sex determinates of house flies. (2019-09-05)
The argument for sexual selection in bacteria
The evolutionary pressure to pass on DNA can produce behavior that otherwise makes no sense in a struggle to survive. (2019-09-04)
Sexual selection influences the evolution of lamprey pheromones
In 'Intra- and Interspecific Variation in Production of Bile Acids that Act As Sex Pheromones in Lampreys,' published in Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, Tyler J. (2019-09-03)
New insights into genetic basis of bird migration
A gene newly associated with the migratory patterns of golden-winged and blue-winged warblers could lend insight into the longstanding question of how birds migrate across such long distances. (2019-08-28)
The genealogy of important broiler ancestor revealed
A new study examines the historical and genetic origins of the White Plymouth Rock chicken, an important contributor to today's meat chickens (broilers). (2019-08-27)
New research predicts stability of mosquito-borne disease prevention
To reduce transmission of dengue to humans, scientists have introduced Wolbachia bacteria to A. aegypti mosquitoes. (2019-08-26)
Genetic diversity couldn't save Darwin's finches
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati found that Charles Darwin's famous finches defy what has long been considered a key to evolutionary success: genetic diversity. (2019-08-22)
Queen bees face increased chance of execution if they mate with two males rather than one
Queen stingless bees face an increased risk of being executed by worker bees if they mate with two males rather than one, according to new research by the University of Sussex and the University of São Paulo. (2019-08-20)
Political campaigns may influence acceptance of violence against women
Nicole Johnson, assistant professor of counseling psychology at Lehigh University, set out to examine the influence, both positive and negative, of presidential campaigns, voting behavior, and candidate selection, on social views of rape culture. (2019-08-15)
AI used to test evolution's oldest mathematical model
Researchers have used artificial intelligence to make new discoveries, and confirm old ones, about one of nature's best-known mimics, opening up whole new directions of research in evolutionary biology. (2019-08-14)
Ancient pigs endured a complete genomic turnover after they arrived in Europe
New research led by Oxford University and Queen Mary University of London has resolved a pig paradox. (2019-08-12)
'Mega-fires' may be too extreme even for a bird that loves fire
Fire is a natural part of western forests, but the changing nature of fire in many parts of North America may pose challenges for birds. (2019-08-06)
The curious tale of the cancer 'parasite' that sailed the seas
A contagious canine cancer that conquered the world by spreading between dogs during mating likely arose around 6,000 years ago in Asia and spread around the globe through maritime activities, scientists say. (2019-08-01)
SUTD researchers developed a unique method of fabricating 3D porous structures
SUTD researchers have developed a novel method of 3D printing to fabricate 3D porous structures in one step. (2019-07-31)
Sexual competition helps horned beetles survive deforestation
A study of how dung beetles survive deforestation in Borneo suggests that species with more competition among males for matings are less likely to go extinct, according to research led by scientists from Queen Mary University of London and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. (2019-07-30)
Hidden genetic variations power evolutionary leaps
So-called 'cryptic' genetic variation plays an important role in evolution, despite having no immediate effect on the behavior or appearance of the organism. (2019-07-25)
Parasitic plants use stolen genes to make them better parasites
Some parasitic plants steal genetic material from their host plants and use the stolen genes to more effectively siphon off the host's nutrients. (2019-07-22)
Study finds Nunavik Inuit are genetically unique
A new study has found that an Inuit population in Canada's Arctic are genetically distinct from any known group, and certain genetic variants are correlated with brain aneurysm. (2019-07-22)
August's SLAS technology cover article announced
The August edition of SLAS Technology features the cover article, 'Technologies for the Directed Evolution of Cell Therapies,' a review featured in the journal's March 2019 edition. (2019-07-22)
Study shows potential for reduced methane from cows
An international team of scientists has shown it is possible to breed cattle to reduce their methane emissions. (2019-07-08)
Hydrogen-natural gas hydrates harvested by natural gas
A recent study has suggested a new strategy for stably storing hydrogen, using natural gas as a stabilizer. (2019-06-21)
Coincidence or master plan?
Joint press release by Kiel University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön (MPI-EB). (2019-06-20)
God doesn't play dice -- does cancer?
Colorado study suggests that changes to the tissue ecosystem and not necessarily mutations allows growth of cancer. (2019-06-20)
Spiders risk everything for love
A biology study finds that blue jays can easily spot wolf spiders engaged in their courtship rituals. (2019-06-20)
SUTD researchers enhance security in proof of stake blockchain protocols
Proof of Stake Blockchain protocols rely on voting mechanisms to reach consensus on the data, but they can be vulnerable to faults when validators accidentally or maliciously withhold their votes. (2019-06-19)
Directed evolution comes to plants
Accelerating plant evolution with CRISPR paves the way for breeders to engineer new crop varieties. (2019-06-19)
Phage display for engineering blood-contacting surfaces
Surfaces that enable endothelial cell attachment without causing blood clotting are needed for various tissue engineering efforts. (2019-06-19)
IDIBELL researchers relate the amplification of a chromosomal region with resistance to to a chemotherapeutic drug in breast cancer
IDIBELL researchers relate the amplification of a chromosomal region with resistance to a chemotherapeutic drug in breast cancer. (2019-06-18)
Study reveals new genomic roots of ecological adaptation in polar bear evolution
Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Vanderbilt University and Clark University have shed new light on the genomic foundation of the polar bear's ecological adaption by pinpointing rapid changes in the bear's gene copy numbers in response to a diet shifting from vegetation to meat. (2019-06-17)
Research identifies key driver for infanticide among chimpanzees
Study concludes that the sexual selection hypothesis was the main reason for the high rates of infanticide among a community of chimpanzees in Uganda. (2019-06-13)
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