Current Negative stereotypes News and Events

Current Negative stereotypes News and Events, Negative stereotypes News Articles.
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Insights in the search for new antibiotics
A collaborative research team from the University of Oklahoma, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Merck & Co. published an opinion article in the journal, Nature Chemical Biology, that addresses the gap in the discovery of new antibiotics. (2020-11-19)

AI tool may predict movies' future ratings
Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, armed with artificial intelligence tools, can rate a movie's content in a matter of seconds, based on the movie script and before a single scene is shot. (2020-11-17)

'Vanished' or 'hidden' prostate cancer? Men with negative biopsies during active surveillance have good outcomes
Can early-stage prostate cancer ''vanish'' during follow-up? More likely the cancer is just ''hidden''--either way, negative biopsies during active surveillance for prostate cancer are associated with excellent long-term outcomes, reports a study in The Journal of Urology®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-11-17)

Peptide is a key mediator in the regulation of compulsive alcohol drinking
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified that a peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating mediator of compulsive consumption of alcohol. In addition, they have discovered that this protein acts in an area of the brain called the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis, or BNST, a region involved in fear, anxiety and stress responses, to exert these effects. (2020-11-16)

Seafood mislabeling is having negative impacts on the marine environment
As the most globally traded food commodity, seafood production and its supply chains are often complex and opaque. Contemporaneous with the increase in seafood consumption, evidence of mislabeling has become ubiquitous. Yet, little is known about the consequences of seafood mislabeling. New research by Advanced Conservation Strategies and colleagues show that conditions exist for mislabeling to generate negative impacts on marine populations and to support consumption of products from poorly managed fisheries. (2020-11-16)

Could robots for sex, friendship improve our aging society?
The current U.S. marketplace for sex robots is geared to fulfilling the needs of young, white, able-bodied, heterosexual males - a population perhaps least in need of such assistance - and simultaneously overlooks a vast demographic of potential customers: senior citizens. A bioethicist identifies the opportunity among socially isolated and disabled people age 65 and over in aging societies: Many would value a robot's companionship and, yes, even its ability to provide sexual gratification. (2020-11-16)

How religion can hamper economic progress
Study from Bocconi University on impact of antiscientific curricula of Catholic schools on accumulation of human capital in France during the 2nd Industrial Revolution could hold lessons on impact of religion on technological progress today. (2020-11-13)

Are diagnostic imaging studies with positive conclusions or titles published faster?
According to the American Journal of Roentgenology, positive conclusions--but not titles--were associated with a shorter time from study completion to publication, which may contribute to an overrepresentation of positive results in the imaging diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) literature. Because an inflated perception of test performance could adversely influence clinical decision making and patient care, bias reduction strategies should undergo trials by both journal editors and researchers in the imaging DTA community. (2020-11-13)

NYUAD researchers develop protocol for a more accurate COVID-19 testing technique
Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's Biology Program and Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (CGSB) have implemented a new three-step testing approach that promises to significantly - and cost-effectively -- improve testing accuracy. (2020-11-09)

COVID Misinformation a Roadblock to Curbing Pandemic
Two new studies suggest that the spread of misinformation about COVID-19 will make it harder for communities to bring the pandemic under control. stereotypes and fears of stigma may be barriers to COVID testing, a finding that confirms previous studies about stigma around HIV and Ebola. And believing COVID conspiracies makes people less likely to support public health policies to reduce the spread of the virus. (2020-11-09)

NIH researchers identify gene in mice that controls food cravings, desire to exercise
National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a gene in mice that controls the craving for fatty and sugary foods and the desire to exercise. The gene, Prkar2a, is highly expressed in the habenula, a tiny brain region involved in responses to pain, stress, anxiety, sleep and reward. The findings could inform future research to prevent obesity and its accompanying risks for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. (2020-11-05)

Lockdown lifestyle link to poor mental health in Scotland
A rise in negative health behaviors - such as lack of sleep, exercise and an unhealthy diet -- is connected to poorer mental health during the tightest restrictions of Scotland's COVID-19 lockdown, a new study has confirmed. (2020-11-04)

it's not if, but how people use social media that impacts their well-being
New research from UBC Okanagan indicates what's most important for overall happiness is how a person uses social media. Derrick Wirtz, an associate professor of teaching in psychology at the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, took a close look at how people use three major social platforms--Facebook, Twitter and Instagram--and how that use can impact a person's overall well-being. (2020-11-02)

Collecting sperm from Covid-19 patients
How does Covid-19 affect sperm and thus the next generation´s immune system? Norwegian researchers are collecting sperm to find the answer. (2020-10-30)

Stereotypes and discrimination contribute to HIV-related stigma among nursing staff
To describe the attitudes of the university nursing faculty toward caring for PLHIV; and to identify the relationship between faculty attitudes and explanatory factors such as age, education, religion, nationality, teaching in a clinical setting, years of experience, and university attributes. (2020-10-30)

Probing water for an electrifying cause
An experiment, elegant in its simplicity, helps explain why water becomes electrified when it touches hydrophobic surfaces. (2020-10-29)

Study tracks public concerns on Twitter about COVID-19
Twitter users initially didn't feel positive about the state of the economy, prevention, treatment and recovery concerning COVID-19. That changed by the end of March 2020. In contrast, throughout the period examined from January to May 2020, the public, in general, felt negative about the way the pandemic had been handled by political leadership. (2020-10-28)

Swiss fatalism protects against negative feelings in the pandemic
Trust or disappointment in government crisis management is an important factor for the general mood, shows a study by the University of Zurich based on surveys in Israel and Switzerland. At the end of April, Israelis were twice as disappointed with their government institutions during the pandemic as Swiss citizens. In Switzerland, a certain fatalism made for less negative feelings. (2020-10-27)

COVID-19: Call for millions spent on failing system to be diverted to local services
A group of doctors is calling on the government to divert the hundreds of millions of pounds being spent on the failing centralised privatised COVID-19 national test and trace service into local primary care, local NHS labs and local public health services. (2020-10-27)

COVID-19 anxiety linked to body image issues
A new study has found that anxiety and stress directly linked to COVID-19 could be causing a number of body image issues. The research, which involved 506 UK adults, found that worries linked to COVID-19 were associated with body dissatisfaction and a desire for thinness in women, and associated with body fat dissatisfaction and a desire for muscularity in men. (2020-10-22)

Study reveals why some blame Asian Americans for COVID-19
A blend of racial prejudice, poor coping and partisan media viewing were found in Americans who stigmatized people of Asian descent during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. But it was prejudice against Asian Americans that was most strongly linked to beliefs that Asians were responsible for the pandemic and most at risk for spreading it, results showed. (2020-10-20)

Study reveals role of sleep deprivation in unwanted thoughts
A new study from the University of York offers an important insight into the impact of sleep on mental health (2020-10-20)

Showcasing successful women's STEM achievements, a social vaccine against gender stereotypes
In a study published in the open access journal Frontiers in Psychology, a team of researchers led by the director of the GenTIC (Gender and ICT) research group at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3), Milagros Sáinz, have demonstrated the impact of female role models in influencing girls' preferences for studying STEM subjects. (2020-10-19)

Save it or spend it? Advertising decisions amid consumer word-of-mouth
Most people have seen or heard from a friend, neighbor or family member about a product or service they've used and how their experience was. It's called observational learning or word-of-mouth. These communications don't provide an unbiased assessment of true quality. Given this, businesses are faced with the difficult decision of determining when and how to spend their ad dollars. (2020-10-19)

How is STEM children's programming prioritizing diversity?
The first large-scale analysis of characters featured in STEM-related educational programming revealed that of the characters appearing in STEM television programming for kids ages 3 to 6, Latinx and females are left behind. (2020-10-16)

Future ocean conditions could cause significant physical changes in marine mussels
Scientists from the University of Plymouth showed increased temperature and acidification of our oceans over the next century could have a range of effects on an economically important marine species (2020-10-09)

New approach helps EMTs better assess chest pain en route to hospital
A study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Health shows that on-scene use of a new protocol and advanced diagnostic equipment can help paramedics better identify patients at high risk for adverse cardiac events. (2020-10-07)

Best materials for border molding in complete dentures fabrication
Application of border molding procedure in the treatment of edentulous jaws (toothlessness in either jaw) increases retention and stability of the prosthesis. In a study in the open-access journal Folia Medica, scientists determined the best impression materials for the procedure. After border molding, the negative pressure between the custom tray and the prosthetic field is created. This is an informal indication for a good impression. Quantitative measurement of negative pressure is possible under clinical conditions. (2020-10-06)

UC study: More coverage of climate wanted
Large majorities of American news audiences care about climate change and want more information from the media on the topic, according to a new report from the University of Cincinnati, in partnership with Yale University and George Mason University. (2020-10-06)

Tool helps clear biases from computer vision
Researchers at Princeton University have developed a tool that flags potential biases in sets of images used to train artificial intelligence (AI) systems. The work is part of a larger effort to remedy and prevent the biases that have crept into AI systems that influence everything from credit services to courtroom sentencing programs. (2020-10-01)

What new research reveals about rude workplace emails
With the advent of the coronavirus pandemic and remote work on the rise, the sheer volume of email exchanges has skyrocketed. Electronic communication is efficient, but it's also distant and detached, and often can be rude. (2020-09-24)

Survey reveals popular misconceptions about child marriage
Misconceptions about child marriage (marriage under 18) appear widespread among the American public, potentially hampering efforts to address the practice globally. David Lawson and colleagues at the University of California, Santa Barbara, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on September 23, 2020. (2020-09-23)

For black girls, attitudes about being black affect risk of depression
A new study suggests that the messages Black girls hear at home about being Black, and about being Black women in particular, can affect their risk of exhibiting the symptoms of depression. (2020-09-22)

Negative pressure wound therapy does not cut infection risk in obese women after cesarean
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) does not appear to lower the risk of infection for obese women after cesarean delivery, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The treatment involves placing a low-pressure pump over a closed surgical wound to create negative air pressure. (2020-09-22)

Is rheumatoid arthritis two different diseases?
While disease activity improves over time for most rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, long-term outcomes only improve in RA patients with autoantibodies, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Xanthe Matthijssen of Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands, and colleagues. The findings add to a growing body of evidence that RA with and without autoantibodies are two distinct conditions. (2020-09-22)

Homicides near schools affect students' educational outcomes
Homicides near schools negatively impact on the educational attainment of children, a new study in the Journal of Labor Economics reports. (2020-09-21)

Making sense of diabetes
Throughout her 38-year nursing career, Laurel Despins has progressed from a bedside nurse to a clinical nurse specialist and has worked in medical, surgical and cardiac intensive care units. She noticed diabetes is rarely referred to as a primary cause of death in itself, yet the disease is a leading contributor to deaths involving heart disease, stroke and cancer. (2020-09-21)

Personal interactions are important drivers of STEM identity in girls
Researchers found that nuanced interactions between teachers and campers at a coding camp for middle school girls as well as among the girls themselves impacted how girls viewed themselves as coders. (2020-09-21)

Women more prone to depression in countries with low gender equality rankings
Overall, the presence of depressive symptoms is highly dependent on cultural congruence, whereas self-esteem is not. (2020-09-16)

Women hold prominent roles, publish more in 'open science' vs. 'reproducibility' model
An international group of researchers examined the two paths that scientists are following to improve science: the movement for reproducibility and the movement for open science. They have very distinct cultures, with two distinct literatures produced by two groups of researchers with little crossover. Their investigation also suggests that one of the movements -- open science -- promotes greater equity, diversity, and inclusivity. (2020-09-16)

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