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Current Negative stereotypes News and Events

Current Negative stereotypes News and Events, Negative stereotypes News Articles.
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Negative emotions cause stronger appetite responses in emotional eaters
A recent study at the University of Salzburg found that emotional eaters -- people who use food to regulate negative emotions -- had a stronger appetite response and found food to be more pleasant when experiencing negative emotions compared to neutral emotions. (2020-06-03)
Get it over with, or procrastinate? New research explores our decision-making process
New research from the UBC Sauder School of Business may have figured out why. (2020-06-02)
How exposure to negative feedback in influences goal-directed consumer behaviors
Threats to self-esteem and negative feedback are pervasive in today's society. (2020-05-26)
Beware of false negatives in diagnostic testing of COVID-19
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that the chance of a false negative result -- when a virus is not detected in a person who actually is, or recently has been, infected -- is greater than 1 in 5 and, at times, far higher. (2020-05-26)
Fine-tuning treatment for triple-negative breast cancer
Researchers at the University of Queensland may have found a way to improve treatment of triple-negative breast cancer. (2020-05-26)
Effects of gender bias, stereotypes in surgical training
This randomized clinical trial investigated the association between pro-male gender bias and negative stereotypes against women during surgical residency on surgical skills and proactive career development of residents in general surgery training programs. (2020-05-20)
Parents with degrees give their children significant advantage in maths
Children of parents with a degree are almost a year of schooling ahead in maths by the age 11 than peers whose parents have just GCSEs, a new study by the University of Sussex has discovered. (2020-05-20)
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. (2020-05-13)
People think robots are pretty incompetent and not funny, new study says
Detecting gender bias against robots was the original intent of a study that revealed two surprises: The gender bias didn't appear. (2020-05-05)
'Loss of pleasure' in teen sleep study
Sleep patterns around the world have been disrupted as screen time increases and sleep routines change with COVID-19 self-isolation requirements. (2020-05-04)
Molecular switch plays crucial role in learning from negative experiences
Neurobiologists at KU Leuven have discovered how the signalling molecule Neuromedin U plays a crucial role in our learning process. (2020-04-29)
Addressing black students' concerns about belonging in college has benefits in adulthood
The benefits of a brief 'social belonging' exercise completed by black students in their first year of college followed them into adulthood, with participants reporting greater career satisfaction, well-being and community involvement almost a decade later. (2020-04-29)
Study shows immunotherapy prior to surgery may help destroy high-risk breast cancer
A new study led by Yale Cancer Center (YCC) researchers shows women with high-risk HER2-negative breast cancer treated before surgery with immunotherapy, plus a PARP inhibitor with chemotherapy, have a higher rate of complete eradication of cancer from the breast and lymph nodes compared to chemotherapy alone. (2020-04-28)
New study finds biases against physically dirty people take root as early as age 5
People develop biases against individuals who are physically dirty as early as the age of 5 and carry these perceptions into adulthood, according to researchers from Boston College and Franklin & Marshall College. (2020-04-28)
The downside of feeling prepared
Feeling prepared and confident about a job interview you have tomorrow is great. (2020-04-22)
Loss of smell and taste validated as COVID-19 symptoms in patients with high recovery rate
Researchers at UC San Diego Health publish the first empirical findings that strongly associate sensory loss and COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the novel coronavirus. (2020-04-13)
Psychology research: Antivaxxers actually think differently than other people
As vaccine skepticism has become increasingly widespread, two researchers in the Texas Tech University Department of Psychological Sciences have suggested a possible explanation. (2020-04-10)
False-negative COVID-19 test results may lead to false sense of security
As COVID-19 testing becomes more widely available, it's vital that health care providers and public health officials understand its limits and the impact false results can have on efforts to curb the pandemic. (2020-04-09)
Restricting sleep may affect emotional reactions
In a recent Journal of Sleep Research study, participants perceived pleasant and neutral pictures in a more negative way when their sleep was restricted for several nights in a row. (2020-04-08)
Older entrepreneurs as successful as their younger counterparts, study reveals
From Steve Jobs to Mark Zuckerberg, the stories of prosperous, young innovators drive the American economic narrative. (2020-04-06)
Physical activity contributes to positive mental well-being in menopausal women
Late menopausal status is associated with an elevated level of depressive symptoms that indicate the negative dimension of mental well-being. (2020-04-01)
Experiences of undesired effects of hormonal contraception
A study of women who experienced mental ill-health from a hormonal contraception indicates they value their mental well-being higher than a satisfactory sex life. (2020-03-31)
COVID-19 found in sputum and feces samples after pharyngeal specimens no longer positive
Clinicians from the Institute of Infectious Diseases at Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University found that some patients had positive real-time fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test results for SARS-CoV-2 in the sputum or feces after the pharyngeal swabs became negative. (2020-03-30)
To stay positive, live in the moment -- but plan ahead
A recent study finds that people who balance living in the moment with planning for the future are best able to weather daily stress without succumbing to negative moods. (2020-03-25)
Bad sleep habits can depress teens
Nagging negative thoughts - and striving for perfection - keep teenagers awake at night, raising their chance of becoming depressed and anxious, a new study shows. (2020-03-18)
Misinformation on vaccines readily available online
Parents researching childhood vaccinations online are likely to encounter significant levels of negative information, researchers at the University of Otago, Wellington, have found. (2020-03-12)
New study presents ion concentrate electrolyte using solvent containing fluorine atoms
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled an ion concentrate electrolyte using a solvent containing fluorine atoms. (2020-03-10)
Possible treatment for breast cancer patients could roll out to clinical trial immediately
A worldwide collaborative study involving scientists at the University of Sussex has proposed a new treatment strategy for patients with a rare but aggressive subtype of cancer known as triple negative breast cancer. (2020-03-10)
Study uncovers bias and stereotyping when recruiting patients for clinical trials
New research published in CANCER reveals bias and stereotyping among clinical and research professionals who recruit patients to enroll in cancer clinical trials. (2020-03-09)
Collaborating with a team of rivals can resolve conflict -- and advance science
Five social scientists holed up in an Amsterdam hotel for a week with the goal of reaching a scientific consensus on how people form stereotypes. (2020-03-09)
When older people feel excluded at work
Employees over 50 can feel excluded and demotivated in the workplace for various reasons. (2020-03-05)
Caffeine boosts problem-solving ability but not creativity, study indicates
Want to boost creativity? Caffeine may not be the way to go according to a news study by U of A psychologist Darya Zabelina. (2020-03-05)
Women deflated by #Fitspiration images
Researchers have found that the #Fitspiration philosophy is flawed, making many women feel worse about themselves and their bodies rather than inspiring them to exercise. (2020-03-04)
In US, changing self-concept can lower well-being
American culture values the freedom to change and reinvent one's self. (2020-03-03)
Changing the debate around obesity
The UK's National Health Service (NHS) needs to do more to address the ingrained stigma and discrimination faced by people with obesity, says a leading health psychologist. (2020-03-03)
Roadmap to a win-win against invasive weeds
Researchers at Wits University in Johannesburg, South Africa, have created the world's first framework, to better guide the management of terrestrial invasive species. (2020-02-27)
Do girls read better than boys? If so, gender stereotypes may be to blame
A new longitudinal study of fifth and sixth graders in Germany examined the relation between classmates' gender stereotypes and individual students' reading outcomes to shed light on how these stereotypes contribute to the gender gap in reading. (2020-02-26)
Simple self-charging battery offers power solutions for devices
A new type of battery combines negative capacitance and negative resistance within the same cell, allowing the cell to self-charge without losing energy, which has important implications for long-term storage and improved output power for batteries. (2020-02-25)
Study finds inflammation caused by radiation can drive triple-negative breast cancer
While radiation is successfully used to treat breast cancer by killing cancer cells, inflammation caused as a side-effect of radiation can have a contrary effect by promoting the survival of triple-negative breast cancer cells, according to research published online in the International Journal of Radiation Biology by Jennifer Sims-Mourtada, Ph.D., director of Translational Breast Cancer Research at ChristianaCare's Helen F. (2020-02-24)
Stress may drive people to give as well as receive emotional support
Penn State researchers found that experiencing stress made people both more likely to give and receive emotional support from another person. (2020-02-24)
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