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Current Negative stereotypes News and Events

Current Negative stereotypes News and Events, Negative stereotypes News Articles.
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Violent video games blamed more often for school shootings by white perpetrators
People are more likely to blame violent video games as a cause of school shootings by white perpetrators than by African-American perpetrators, possibly because of racial stereotypes that associate minorities with violent crime, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-09-16)
Misperceptions about racial economic progress are pervasive
The vast majority of Americans underestimate the magnitude of economic inequality between Whites and racial minorities, particularly black and Latinx people, new data indicate. (2019-09-16)
Negative posts on Facebook business pages outweigh positive posts 2 to 1
There are more than 60 million business pages on Facebook and that number is from 2017. (2019-09-13)
Bias against single people affects their cancer treatment
New research reveals the dangerous bias that's been buried in the fine print of academic and medical journals for more than 30 years. (2019-09-09)
More time spent standing helps combat effects of sedentary lifestyle
A study conducted by scientists from the University of Granada and published in the journal PLOS ONE recommends that people spend more time standing, to increase energy expenditure and thus avoid the negative health problems associated with a sedentary li (2019-09-06)
Study finds increase in women giving TED talks but not ethnic minorities
Women gave more than half of TED talks in the first half of 2017, up from less than one-third in 2006, according to a new study published in Political Research Exchange. (2019-09-02)
Negative interest rate policies are backfiring -- new research
Negative interest rate policies in Europe and Japan were intended to stimulate flagging economies but research from the University of Bath they may be doing more harm than good. (2019-08-29)
Estimate of the national burden of HPV-positive oropharyngeal head and neck cancers
Investigators from the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center (DFBWCC) have conducted the largest study to date on the incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in the U.S., finding that 75 percent of oropharynx cancers are related to HPV and the U.S. incidence of HPV-related throat cancer is 4.6 per 100,000 people, peaking in those aged 60-64. (2019-08-28)
Neurological brain markers might detect risk for psychotic disorders
People who may hear and see things that are not there could have symptoms of psychosis, better known as psychotic disorders. (2019-08-27)
Women are beautiful, men rational
Men are typically described by words that refer to behavior, while adjectives ascribed to women tend to be associated with physical appearance. (2019-08-27)
Adolescents' fun seeking predicts both risk taking and prosocial behavior
Research shows that risk-taking behaviors, such as binge drinking, may increase throughout adolescence. (2019-08-27)
Oncologists echo findings that suggest a reduced risk of breast cancer recurrence
Oncologists at VCU Massey Cancer Center were invited to co-author an editorial published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology providing expert commentary on findings from a large study conducted by German investigators that a modified drug combination may lead to a decreased chance of disease recurrence for women with high risk, HER-2 negative breast cancer. (2019-08-26)
Even scientists have gender stereotypes ... which can hamper the career of women researchers
However convinced we may be that science is not just for men, the concept of science remains much more strongly associated with masculinity than with femininity in people's minds. (2019-08-26)
New report finds 100% juice helps improve children's diet quality
A new report supports existing scientific data maintaining juice as part of a healthy diet, and reinforces that claims linking 100% juice to negative health outcomes are not supported by research. (2019-08-22)
Water availability determines carbon uptake under climate warming: study
A research group led by Dr. NIU Shuli from the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that water availability in soil determines the direction of carbon-climate feedback. (2019-08-22)
Hush, baby -- the dog is whimpering!
We are all familiar with the sounds of a cat or dog vying for human attention, and for pet-owners, these sounds are particularly evocative. (2019-08-21)
Winning coaches' locker room secret
Researchers found a significant relationship between how negative a coach was at half-time and how well the team played in the second half: The more negativity, the more the team outscored the opposition. (2019-08-15)
Negative memory storage affects depression symptoms
Physical manifestations of negative memories in the hippocampus could underlie cognitive symptoms of depression, according to research in mice published in JNeurosci. (2019-08-12)
Study finds older adults less distracted by negative information
USC researchers looked at 'emotion-induced blindness,' which refers to distractions caused by emotionally arousing stimuli. (2019-08-12)
Blood clotting factors may help fight multi-drug resistant superbugs
Coagulation factors, which are involved in blood clotting after injury, may offer new strategies for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria, according to a study published in Cell Research. (2019-08-08)
Explaining why TP53 is commonly mutated in human cancer, and the effects of its mutation
A comprehensive functional analysis of TP53 mutations in human leukemia may refute a working hypothesis -- primarily based on mouse studies -- that missense mutations confer new cancer-causing functions to the p53 tumor suppressor protein; the new study instead suggests that these mutations exert a 'dominant-negative' effect that reduces the cancer-suppressing activity of wild-type p53, the authors say. (2019-08-08)
Study assesses outcomes for meth users with burn injures
UC Davis Health researchers were surprised to find that methamphetamine use is not linked with worse health outcomes among burn patients, but was associated with significantly worse discharge conditions for meth-positive patients. (2019-08-01)
Human trafficking victims' unlikeliness to report crimes tied to police officers' bias
Based on researchers' review of human trafficking investigations and interviews with police and service providers in three communities in Northeast, West, and South United States, a new study concluded that victims of human trafficking often do not trust the police and rarely seek their assistance. (2019-08-01)
What compulsive dating-app users have in common
Loneliness and social anxiety is a bad combination for single people who use dating apps on their phones, a new study suggests. (2019-07-31)
How we care for the environment may have social consequences
Anyone can express their commitment to the environment through individual efforts, but some pro-environmental or 'green' behaviors may be seen as either feminine or masculine, which Penn State researchers say may have social consequences. (2019-07-30)
Study shows non-lethal impacts of seabirds' plastic ingestion
An IMAS-led study of seabirds that had ingested plastic debris has revealed a range of non-lethal impacts on their health and physiology. (2019-07-30)
Muslim LGBTQI+ refugees more likely to gain asylum in Germany if they conform to stereotypes, study
LGBTQI+ Muslims seeking asylum are more successful if they speak, dress and act in accordance with Western notions of homosexuality, according to a new study. (2019-07-25)
Using visual imagery to find your true passions
You may think you know what you like -- how to spend your time or what profession to pursue. (2019-07-22)
Women no longer regarded as less competent than men but still seen as less ambitious
Good news for women -- they are no longer regarded as less competent than men on average, according to a nationally representative study of gender stereotypes in the United States. (2019-07-18)
Women now seen as equally as or more competent then men
Women have come a long way in the United States over the last 70 years, to the point where they are now seen as being as competent as men, if not more so, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-07-18)
The unpopular truth about biases toward people with disabilities
Needing to ride in a wheelchair can put the brakes on myriad opportunities -- some less obvious than one might think. (2019-07-18)
Self-injuring young girls overestimate negative feedback in social media simulation
Adolescent girls who self-injure feel that they receive more negative feedback than they actually receive, and are more sensitive to 'thumbs down' responses, compared to other adolescent girls. (2019-07-17)
Link between workplace sexual harassment and women's negative self-views may be weakening
A survey analysis suggests that, between 2016 and 2018, the relationship between workplace sexual harassment and women's negative self-views weakened. (2019-07-17)
'Racist police officer' stereotype may become a self-fulfilling prophecy
Belief in the 'racist police officer' stereotype may become a self-fulfilling prophecy for law enforcement officers and lead to increased support for forceful or threatening policing tactics, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-07-15)
Study confirms disparities in triple-negative breast cancer diagnoses
A new study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, shows that women of color and young women may face elevated risks of developing triple-negative breast cancers, which are often aggressive and do not respond to hormone therapy or targeted therapy. (2019-07-08)
Autistic adults experience high rates of negative life events
Autistic adults are vulnerable to many types of negative life experience, including employment difficulties, financial hardship, domestic abuse and 'mate-crime', according to new research published today in the journal Autism Research. (2019-07-08)
Study: Some stereotypes seem to be universally applied to biracial groups in the US
A new Northwestern University study has found evidence that there are some stereotypes that seem to be universally applied to biracial groups in the U.S. (2019-07-08)
New study unravels protection mechanism in bacteria
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have shed fresh light on the mechanism used by certain types of bacteria to protect themselves against attack. (2019-07-03)
Misjudging the strength of other people's emotions based on egocentric bias
People of all ages tend to misjudge the strength of other people's emotions based on an egocentric bias, according to a new study by Associate Professor Hajimu Hayashi, Kobe University Graduate School of Human Development and Environment. (2019-07-02)
Seeing the doctor? Relax, you'll remember more
Some patients feel shame, anxiety or fear immediately before seeing their doctor, making them tense. (2019-06-24)
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