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Current Nerve cells News and Events, Nerve cells News Articles.
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The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
Scientists at EPFL's Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research have discovered a signaling pathway that breast tumors exploit to metastasize to the brain. (2019-09-18)
Imaging reveals new results from landmark stem cell trial for stroke
Researchers led by Sean I. Savitz, M.D., at UTHealth Houston reported today in the journal Stem Cells that bone marrow cells used to treat ischemic stroke in an expanded Phase I trial were not only safe and feasible, but also resulted in enhanced recovery compared to a matched historical control group. (2019-09-17)
A Matter of concentration
Researchers are studying how proteins regulate the stem cells of plants. (2019-09-17)
Scanning the lens of the eye could predict type 2 diabetes and prediabetes
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain, (Sept. (2019-09-15)
B cells linked to immunotherapy for melanoma
Immunotherapy uses our body's own immune system to fight cancer. (2019-09-13)
Discovery concerning the nervous system overturns a previous theory
It appears that when our nervous system is developing, only the most viable neurons survive, while immature neurons are weeded out and die. (2019-09-12)
Cause of congenital nystagmus found
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have overturned the long held view that congenital nystagmus, a condition where eyes make repetitive involuntary movements, is a brain disorder by showing that its cause is actually retinal. (2019-09-12)
'Clamp' regulates message transfer between mammal neurons
Today, in the journal Nature Communications, Edwin Chapman, a professor of neuroscience at University of Wisconsin-Madison, has described a key component of the nerve biology system -- the brake, or 'clamp,' that prevents the fusion pore from completing its formation and opening. (2019-09-09)
The birth of vision, from the retina to the brain
How do neurons differentiate to become individual components of the visual system? (2019-09-09)
New research provides hope for people living with chronic pain
Dr. Gerald Zamponi, Ph.D., and a team with the Cumming School of Medicine's Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) and researchers at Stanford University, California, have been investigating which brain circuits are changed by injury, in order to develop targeted therapies to reset the brain to stop chronic pain. (2019-09-09)
How brain rhythms organize our visual perception
Imagine that you are watching a crowded hang-gliding competition, keeping track of a red and orange glider's skillful movements. (2019-09-09)
New drug may protect against memory loss in Alzheimer's disease
A new drug discovered through a research collaboration between the University at Buffalo and Tetra Therapeutics may protect against memory loss, nerve damage and other symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. (2019-09-09)
New compound promotes healing of myelin in nervous system disorders
Researchers working with mice have developed a compound that promotes rebuilding of the protective sheath around nerve cells that's damaged in conditions such as multiple sclerosis. (2019-09-06)
Sound deprivation in one ear leads to speech recognition difficulties
Chronic conductive hearing loss, which can result from middle-ear infections, has been linked to speech recognition deficits, according to the results of a new study of 240 patients, led by scientists at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. (2019-09-06)
New insight into motor neuron death mechanisms could be a step toward ALS treatment
Researchers have made an important advance toward understanding why certain cells in the nervous system are prone to breaking down and dying, which is what happens in patients with ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. (2019-09-04)
Protein tangles linked with dementia seen in patients after single head injury
Scientists have visualized for the first time protein 'tangles' associated with dementia in the brains of patients who have suffered a single head injury. (2019-09-04)
Poor diet can lead to blindness
An extreme case of 'fussy' or 'picky' eating caused a young patient's blindness, according to a new case report published today [2 Sep 2019] in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2019-09-02)
Unique fingerprint: What makes nerve cells unmistakable?
Protein variations that result from the process of alternative splicing control the identity and function of nerve cells in the brain. (2019-09-02)
Signal blocks stem cell division in the geriatric brain
Scientists from Basel have investigated the activity of stem cells in the brain of mice and discovered a key mechanism that controls cell proliferation. (2019-08-28)
How texture deceives the moving finger
The perceived speed of a surface moving across the skin depends on texture, with some textures fooling us into thinking that an object is moving faster than it is, according to a study published Aug. (2019-08-27)
Defective sheath
Schwann cells form a protective sheath around nerve fibres and ensure that nerve impulses are transmitted rapidly. (2019-08-27)
Breaching the brain's defense causes epilepsy
Epileptic seizures can happen to anyone. But how do they occur and what initiates such a rapid response? (2019-08-26)
Australian researchers reveal new insights into retina's genetic code
Australian scientists have led the development of the world's most detailed gene map of the human retina, providing new insights which will help future research to prevent and treat blindness. (2019-08-25)
New approaches to heal injured nerves
Injuries to nerve fibers in the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves usually result in functional losses as the nerve fibers are unable to regenerate. (2019-08-23)
Protein-transport discovery may help define new strategies for treating eye disease
Many forms of vision loss stem from a common source: impaired communication between the eye and the brain. (2019-08-21)
Insight into cells' 'self-eating' process could pave the way for new dementia treatments
Cells regularly go through a process called autophagy -- literally translated as 'self-eating' -- which helps to destroy bacteria and viruses after infection. (2019-08-21)
Multi-tasking protein at the root of neuropathic pain
Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition resulting from nerve injury and is characterized by increased pain sensitivity. (2019-08-20)
Single protein plays important dual transport roles in the brain
Edwin Chapman of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the University of Wisconsin-Madison reports that halting production of synaptotagmin 17 (syt-17) blocks growth of axons. (2019-08-19)
Optic nerve stimulation to aid the blind
EPFL scientists are investigating new ways to provide visual signals to the blind by directly stimulating the optic nerve. (2019-08-19)
NIH study in mice identifies type of brain cell involved in stuttering
Researchers believe that stuttering -- a potentially lifelong and debilitating speech disorder -- stems from problems with the circuits in the brain that control speech, but precisely how and where these problems occur is unknown. (2019-08-19)
New pain organ discovered in the skin
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered a new sensory organ that is able to detect painful mechanical damage, such as pricks and impacts. (2019-08-15)
Firework memories
Recently Weizmann Institute scientists succeeded in recording these rapid bursts of activity -- called 'hippocampal ripples' -- in the human brain, and they were able to demonstrate their importance as a neuronal mechanism underlying the engraving of new memories and their subsequent recall. (2019-08-15)
Finnish discovery brings new insight on the functioning of the eye and retinal diseases
Finnish researchers have found cellular components in the epithelial tissue of the eye, which have previously been thought to only be present in electrically active tissues, such as those in nerves and the heart. (2019-08-15)
Joint lubricating fluid plays key role in osteoarthritic pain, study finds
A team at the University of Cambridge has shown how, in osteoarthritis patients, the viscous lubricant that ordinarily allows our joints to move smoothly triggers a pain response from nerve cells similar that caused by chilli peppers. (2019-08-14)
ADHD medication may affect brain development in children
A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect the development of the brain's signal-carrying white matter in children with the disorder, according to a new study. (2019-08-13)
Researchers identify glial cells as critical players in brain's response to social stress
Exposure to violence, social conflict, and other stressors increase risk for psychiatric conditions such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. (2019-08-13)
Decoding touch
Study in mice reveals several distinct molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal touch sensitivity in autism spectrum disorders. (2019-08-08)
Researchers identify key proteins for the repair of nerve fibers
Scientists at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) have identified a group of proteins that help to regenerate damaged nerve cells. (2019-08-07)
'Bone in a dish' opens new window on cancer initiation, metastasis, bone healing
Researchers in Oregon have engineered a material that replicates human bone tissue with an unprecedented level of precision, from its microscopic crystal structure to its biological activity. (2019-08-06)
Efficient, interconnected, stable: New carbon nanotubes to grow neurons
Carbon nanotubes able to take on the desired shapes thanks to a special chemical treatment, called crosslinking and, at the same time, able to function as substrata for the growth of nerve cells, finely tuning their growth and activity. (2019-08-02)
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