Current Neurodegenerative diseases News and Events

Current Neurodegenerative diseases News and Events, Neurodegenerative diseases News Articles.
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World's first: Drug guides stem cells to desired location, improving their ability to heal
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have created a drug that can lure stem cells to damaged tissue and improve treatment efficacy--a scientific first and major advance for the field of regenerative medicine. (2020-11-24)

Trinity researchers discover how the brain 're-wires' after disease
Trinity College researchers are studying how the brain re-wires itself in neurological disease. The team is building treatments for today's more common global conditions like Motor Neurone Disease (MND/ALS) and Spinal Muscular Atrophy and their findings could impact rehabilitation for patients, the discovery of effective drugs and quantifying the potential efficacy of new therapies. (2020-11-24)

Potential new therapies for Alzheimer's disease are revealed through network modeling of its complex molecular interactions
Researchers from Mount Sinai and the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology in Japan have identified new molecular mechanisms driving late-onset Alzheimer's Disease. (2020-11-24)

Dormant threat: Abnormal proteins unleash latent toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases
Though neurodegenerative diseases are becoming more common in today's aging societies, the exact way in which accumulated abnormal proteins become toxic to neurons is unknown. In a recent study conducted at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, scientists have discovered a new mechanism of action by which these abnormal proteins actually unlock the normally latent toxicity of native proteins. Their results represent a completely new avenue toward the development of effective therapies. (2020-11-20)

Taking out the trash is essential for brain health
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have identified a protein called Wipi3 that is essential for cellular waste disposal via the alternative autophagy system. Deletion of Wipi3 in the brains of mice causes growth and motor defects attributed to neuronal accumulation of iron, resulting in neurodegeneration. However, over-expression of another alternative autophagy protein, Dram1, reverses the effects in Wipi3 deficiency, and may represent a novel treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-11-19)

CLCN6 identified as disease gene for a severe form of lysosomal neurodegenerative disease
A mutation in the CLCN6 gene is associated with a novel, particularly severe neurodegenerative disorder. Scientists from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) and the Max Delbrück Center für Molekulare Medizin (MDC), together with an international team of researchers, have now analyzed the effect of a point mutation that was found in three unrelated affected children. (2020-11-19)

Compound for Alzheimer's combats bacterial resistance to last-resort antibiotics in mice
An experimental drug for neurodegenerative diseases can also reverse resistance to ''last-resort'' polymyxin antibiotics among bacteria that cause sepsis, a life-threatening complication from infections. (2020-11-18)

The long road to dementia
Alzheimer's disease develops over decades. It begins with a fatal chain reaction in which masses of misfolded beta-amyloid proteins are produced that in the end literally flood the brain. Researchers from the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases show in the journal Nature Neuroscience that this chain reaction starts much earlier in mice than commonly assumed. (2020-11-17)

Study explores sleep apnea, autoimmune disease link
New research by University of Georgia scientists sheds light on why people with obstructive sleep apnea may have associated autoimmune disorders. The results could lead to better approaches to treatment and possibly new drug therapies. (2020-11-17)

Blood biomarkers for detecting brain injury in COVID-19 patients
COVID-19 can directly cause neurologic symptoms and long-term neurological disease. Elevations of blood biomarkers indicative of brain injury have been reported in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of COVID-19 patients. Clinical application of blood biomarkers to improve medical management of COVID-19 patients (2020-11-17)

Overly reactivated star-shaped cells explain the unpredictability of Alzheimer's disease
IBS-KIST researchers have demonstrated that the severity of 'reactive astrocytes' is a key indicator for the onset of Alzheimer's disease. (2020-11-16)

Link between Alzheimer's disease and gut microbiota is confirmed
In recent years, the scientific community has suspected that the gut microbiota plays a role in the development of the disease. A team from the University and the Hospital of Geneva the National Research and, University and IRCCS SDN Research Center of Naples, confirm the correlation, in humans, between an imbalance in the gut microbiota and the development of amyloid plaques in the brain, which are at the origin of Alzheimer's disease. (2020-11-13)

Researchers generate a brain cell type crucial to support neural activity
Researchers of the Department of Cellular Biology, Genetics and Physiology of the University of Malaga (UMA) have succeeded in generating human OLs from pluripotent stem cells derived from patients with nervous system diseases, specifically multiple sclerosis or ALS. (2020-11-12)

Brain metastases cause severe brain damage that can be inhibited by treatment
By using a specific treatment to override this activation, the researchers were able to return cerebrovascular flow to healthy levels. This improvement in blood flow around the metastases can limit the neurological deterioration associated with the progression of this disease and improve the otherwise poor life expectancy of these patients. (2020-11-12)

Innovative machine-learning approach for future diagnostic advances in Parkinson's disease
In a new study led by the Immune Systems Biology research group of the LIH Department of Infection and Immunity, researchers adopted a holistic machine-learning approach to elucidate how the interactions between neuronal mitochondria can serve as a powerful tool to distinguish nerve cells from Parkinson's patients from those belonging to healthy subjects, thereby providing new insights in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this neurodegenerative disorder. The results were published in 'Nature Partner Journals Systems Biology and Application'. (2020-11-12)

How molecular chaperones dissolve protein aggregates linked to Parkinson's disease
In many neurodegenerative diseases, proteins clump in the brain, forming so-called amyloid fibrils. Yet there exists a cellular defence mechanism that counteracts this process and even dissolves fibrils already formed. The mechanism is based on the activity of molecular helpers, so-called chaperones of the heat shock protein 70 family. Heidelberg researchers studied how the Hsp70 system disaggregates fibrils of the Parkinson-specific protein α-synuclein in a test tube. (2020-11-11)

Detecting Alzheimer's disease before symptoms arise
Both of Andrew Kiselica's grandfathers developed dementia when he was in graduate school. (2020-11-11)

Trace amine-associated receptor 5 (TAAR5) to rewire your brain naturally
Researchers have found a new role for recently discovered neurotransmitter system that uses the trace amine-associated receptor 5 (TAAR5) for neurotransmission. It has been observed that lack of TAAR5 in mice leads to a higher number of dopamine neurons and an increase in adult neurogenesis, i.e. the process by which new neurons are formed in the brain. (2020-11-10)

Optogenetic stimulation improves alterations in Huntington's disease experimental models
A study led by researchers of the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) has characterized one of the neuronal circuits involved in the development of the Huntington's disease. The study, published in the journal eLife, shows in an animal model with the pathology, that optogenetic stimulation of the circuit causes improvements in the typical symptomatology of the disease. (2020-11-10)

Bringing drugs to the brain with nanoparticles to treat neurodegenerative diseases
Researchers from the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) have shown that nanoparticles could be used to deliver drugs to the brain to treat neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-11-09)

An Amazonian tea stimulates the formation of new neurons
For centuries, indigenous societies in the Amazon have used ayahuasca, a hallucinogenic tea, for shamanic purposes. A research group led by the Complutense University of Madrid has shown that in animal models, this drink stimulates the formation of neurons and other brain cells, and thus offers a potential therapy for psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-11-06)

Beetroot peptide as potential drug candidate for treating diseases
In a recent study, a research group led by Christian Gruber at MedUni Vienna's Institute of Pharmacology isolated a peptide (small protein molecule) from beetroot. The peptide is able to inhibit a particular enzyme that is responsible for the breakdown of messenger molecules in the body. Due to its particularly stable molecular structure and pharmacological properties, the beetroot peptide may be a good candidate for development of a drug to treat certain inflammatory diseases, such as e.g. neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. (2020-10-30)

Brain imaging of tau protein in patients with various forms of dementia
A new imaging-based method could enable the early detection and differentiation of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the buildup of tau protein in the brain, suggests an October 29 in the journal Neuron. The researchers demonstrate that the method enables sensitive detection of tau deposits in mice and in patients with Alzheimer's disease and various frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) disorders. The authors say the approach could also be used to evaluate disease mechanisms or anti-tau therapies. (2020-10-29)

ALS and frontotemporal dementia: early diagnosis thanks to an experimental test
A test to diagnose two very serious diseases such as ALS and FTD when the pathologies have not yet appeared: a new methodology succeeds in detecting the protein TDP-43 - the same that accumulates in the brain of patients - even when it is present in minute quantities in the body. Since there are currently no treatments that can interfere with the course of the two diseases, early detection could be of great help to develop useful drugs and understand their dynamics (2020-10-26)

Mayo Clinic: diagnostic, therapeutic advance for rare neurodegenerative disorder
Mayo Clinic researchers, along with national and global collaborators, have developed a potential test for Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) ? a disease that has no cure. They also have clarified the role of a gene target associated with the disease. (2020-10-21)

Coronavirus: Study finds further door opener into the cell
The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is known to infect cells via the receptor ACE2. An international research team under German-Finnish coordination has now identified neuropilin-1 as a factor that can facilitate SARS-CoV-2 entry into the cells' interior. Neuropilin-1 is localized in the respiratory and olfactory epithelia. Experts from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Technical University of Munich, University Medical Center Goettingen, University of Helsinki and other research institutions now published their findings in the journal ''Science''. (2020-10-20)

Penn Medicine researchers use artificial intelligence to 'redefine' Alzheimer's Disease
The researchers will apply advanced artificial intelligence (AI) methods to integrate and find patterns in genetic, imaging, and clinical data from over 60,000 Alzheimer's patients -- representing one of the largest and most ambitious research undertakings of its kind. (2020-10-14)

Presented a program capable of detecting neurodegeneration biomarkers through magnetic
This tool is able to identify single-person neurodegeneration before the symptom's appearance, which could significate a more effective and personalized medicine. (2020-10-08)

New class of highly effective inhibitors protects against neurodegeneration
Heidelberg University neurobiologists have uncovered how a special receptor can lead to cell death. Their fundamental findings on neurodegenerative processes simultaneously led the researchers to a completely new principle for therapeutic agents. In their experiments on mouse models, they discovered a new class of highly effective inhibitors for protecting nerve cells. This novel class of drugs opens up perspectives to combat currently untreatable diseases of the nervous system. (2020-10-08)

Taking the STING out of MND
Melbourne researchers are working towards a potential treatment to slow the progression of motor neuron disease (MND). The research team have uncovered how inflammation in MND is triggered. Pinpointing the molecules involved in this pathway could be a first step towards a new treatment for MND. (2020-10-07)

Igniting the synthetic transport of amino acids in living cells
Researchers from ICIQ's Ballester group and IRBBarcelona's Palacín group have published a paper in Chem showing how a synthetic carrier calix[4]pyrrole cavitand can transport amino acids across liposome and cell membranes bringing future therapies a step closer. (2020-10-06)

Sanford Burnham Prebys wins $8.5 million in NIH Transformative Research grants
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute today announced that two faculty members, Peter Adams, Ph.D., and Jerold Chun, M.D., Ph.D., have received National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director's Transformative Research Awards. The awards, which total $8.5 million and are two of only nine granted in 2020, come from the NIH Common Fund's High-Risk, High-Reward Program. (2020-10-06)

Fly larvae extract will replace antibiotics in fighting plant pathogens
Biotechnologists from MIPT have developed a method for extracting the active constituents from the fat of black soldier fly larvae. These compounds possess unique antimicrobial properties and can destroy bacteria that cause farm crop diseases and are resistant to antibiotics. (2020-10-05)

People with Parkinson's disease have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19
A new database analysis of approximately 80,000 patients shows that people with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a 30% higher death rate from COVID-19 than people without the neurodegenerative condition. The new analysis of patient data in the TriNetX COVID-19 research network conducted by University of Iowa researchers and published in Movement Disorders suggests that Parkinson's disease is an independent risk factor for dying from COVID-19. (2020-10-01)

Penn Medicine researchers discover a rare genetic form of dementia
A new, rare genetic form of dementia has been discovered by a team of Penn Medicine researchers. This discovery also sheds light on a new pathway that leads to protein build up in the brain -- which causes this newly discovered disease, as well as related neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's Disease -- that could be targeted for new therapies. The study was published today in Science. (2020-10-01)

Novel role of microglia as modulators of neurons in the brain is discovered
Findings offer potential target for treating behavioral abnormalities associated with neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's Disease. (2020-09-30)

Why do structural differences in α-synuclein aggregates cause different pathologies?
Abnormal α-synuclein aggregation has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases and is known to spread in a prion-like manner. There is a relationship between protein aggregate structure (strain) and clinical phenotype in prion diseases, however, whether differences in the strains of α synuclein aggregates account for the different pathologies remained unclear. Researchers in Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (TMIMS) discovered a possible molecular mechanism to account for the different pathologies induced by different α synuclein strains. (2020-09-29)

First 'pathoconnectome' could point toward new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases
Scientists from the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah have achieved another first in the field of connectomics, which studies the synaptic connections between neurons. The lab has produced the first pathoconnectome, showing how eye disease alters retinal circuitry. (2020-09-29)

COVID-19: Berlin scientists lay basis for a passive vaccination
Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have identified highly effective antibodies against the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and are now pursuing the development of a passive vaccination. In this process, they have also discovered that some SARS-CoV-2 antibodies bind to tissue samples from various organs, which could potentially trigger undesired side effects. They report their findings in the scientific journal ''Cell''. (2020-09-24)

Decreased protein degradation in cerebellum leads to motor dysfunction
A research team from Kumamoto University, Japan has developed an animal model that reproduces motor dysfunction and cerebellar neurodegeneration similar to that in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) by inhibiting chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in cerebellar neurons. Since CMA activity is reduced in cells expressing SCA causing proteins, CMA is expected to become a new therapeutic target for SCA--a disease that currently has no basic treatment. (2020-09-23)

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