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Current Neurons News and Events, Neurons News Articles.
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Growing a cerebral tract in a microscale brain model
An international research team led by The University of Tokyo modeled the growth of cerebral tracts. (2019-04-18)
General anesthesia hijacks sleep circuitry to knock you out
In a study published online April 18 in Neuron, researchers found that general anesthesia induces unconsciousness by hijacking the neural circuitry that makes us fall sleep. (2019-04-18)
Research provides important insight on the brain-body connection
A study conducted by University of Arkansas researchers reveals that neurons in the motor cortex exhibit an unexpected division of labor, a finding that could help scientists understand how the brain controls the body and provide insight on certain neurological disorders. (2019-04-18)
Neuron and synapse-mimetic spintronics devices developed
A research group from Tohoku University has developed spintronics devices which are promising for future energy-efficient and adoptive computing systems, as they behave like neurons and synapses in the human brain. (2019-04-17)
Cell-type specific mechanism for formation and retrieval of cocaine-associated memories
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University has revealed neuronal mechanisms underlying the formation and retrieval of cocaine use-associated memories. (2019-04-15)
What happens in the bodies of ALS patients?
Lara Marrone and Jared Sterneckert from the Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at Technische Universität Dresden (TUD), together with collaborating scientists from Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and the USA, have now discovered that interactions between RNA-binding proteins are more critical to ALS pathogenesis than previously thought. (2019-04-15)
Low-intensity ultrasound can change decision-making process in the brain, research shows
This is a peer-reviewed empirical study conducted in animals (macaque monkeys) The study shows how low-intensity ultrasonic waves can be used to generate or suppress electrical signals in the brain, modulating normal brain function. (2019-04-15)
SRC-1 gene variants linked to human obesity
Researchers have discovered how the gene SRC-1 affects body weight control. (2019-04-12)
Heads in the cloud: Scientists predict internet of thoughts 'within decades'
An international collaboration led by researchers at UC Berkeley and the US Institute for Molecular Manufacturing predicts that exponential progress in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, AI, and computation will lead this century to the development of a ''Human Brain/Cloud Interface'' (B/CI), that connects neurons and synapses in the brain to vast cloud-computing networks in real time. (2019-04-12)
Artificial intelligence singles out neurons faster than a human can
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed an automated process that can track and map active neurons as accurately as a human can, but in a fraction of the time. (2019-04-12)
Growth hormone acts to prevent weight loss
A Brazilian study shows that, like leptin, growth hormone contributes directly to energy conservation when the body loses weight. (2019-04-12)
I feel you: Emotional mirror neurons found in the rat
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have found that the rat brain activates the same cells when they observe the pain of others as when they experience pain themselves. (2019-04-11)
Broken mitochondria use 'eat me' proteins to summon their executioners
When mitochondria become damaged, they avoid causing further problems by signaling cellular proteins to degrade them. (2019-04-11)
'Mindreading' neurons simulate decisions of social partners
Scientists have identified special types of brain cells that may allow us to simulate the decision-making processes of others, thereby reconstructing their state of mind and predicting their intentions. (2019-04-11)
New study advances treatment options for PTSD
Dr. Stephen Maren, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, recently published significant research on the psychological and neural basis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). (2019-04-11)
Why is ketamine an antidepressant?
Delving deep inside the neural circuitry of 'depressed' mice, researchers have revealed how ketamine works in cells to achieve its fast-acting antidepressant effect. (2019-04-11)
Ketamine reverses neural changes underlying depression-related behaviors in mice
Researchers have identified ketamine-induced brain-related changes that are responsible for maintaining the remission of behaviors related to depression in mice. (2019-04-11)
Anesthesia sends neurons down the wrong path in unborn rat babies
A study in Cerebral Cortex provides new insight into why -- and when -- anesthesia during pregnancy harms unborn brains. (2019-04-11)
Protein pileup affects social behaviors through altered brain signaling
Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) have discovered that when a normal cellular cleanup process is disrupted, mice start behaving in ways that resemble human symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. (2019-04-10)
Physical activity prepares neurons to regenerate in case of spinal cord injury
The influence of an active lifestyle on the regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system, that is, the set of cranial and spinal nerves that control motor and sensory functions, is described here for the first time, explains Ángel Barco, who has led the participation of the Institute of Neurosciences UMH-CSIC, in Alicante, in this international study. (2019-04-10)
Are you with me? New model explains origins of empathy
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute and the Santa Fe Institute have developed a new model to explain the evolutionary origins of empathy and other related phenomena, such as emotional contagion and contagious yawning. (2019-04-08)
The brain's auto-complete function
When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. (2019-04-03)
Abnormalities in a protein affecting how nerve cells change shape
Amsterdam, NL, April 3, 2019 - Since 1993, when the gene that causes Huntington's disease (HD) was identified, there has been intense focus on understanding how this genetic mutation causes the disease's severe progressive neural deterioration. (2019-04-03)
Circadian clock plays unexpected role in neurodegenerative diseases
Northwestern University researchers induced jet lag in a fruit fly model of Huntington disease and found that jet lag protected the flies' neurons. (2019-04-02)
Dopamine conducts prefrontal cortex ensembles
New research in rodents reveals for the first time how dopamine changes the function of the brain's prefrontal cortex. (2019-04-02)
Thalamus and cerebral cortex interactions influence the decision on sensory perceptions
When we receive a stimulus, sensory information is transmitted by the afferent nerves to the thalamus which in turn, like a relay, forwards the information to the sensory cortex to process it and consciously perceive the stimulus. (2019-04-01)
How the brain fights off fears that return to haunt us
Neuroscientists have discovered a group of neurons that are responsible when a frightening memory re-emerges unexpectedly, like Michael Myers in every 'Halloween' movie. (2019-04-01)
In mice, single population of stem cells contributes to lifelong hippocampal neurogenesis
In the latest update in the field of adult neurogenesis, a team of researchers has shown in mice that a single lineage of neural progenitors contributes to embryonic, early postnatal, and adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and that these cells are continuously generated throughout a lifetime. (2019-03-28)
Penn researchers discover the source of new neurons in brain hippocampus
Researchers have shown, in mice, that one type of stem cell that makes adult neurons is the source of this lifetime stock of new cells in the hippocampus. (2019-03-28)
Scientists find brain mechanism that naturally combats overeating
Studying a brain region involved in memory, researchers discovered a set of neurons that help mice control their appetite. (2019-03-28)
Development of a technology to produce dorsal cortical neurons
Expectation on the identification of the mechanism of causing brain diseases and regeneration treatment for brain tissues (2019-03-27)
Had enough water? Brain's thirst centers make a gut check
Until recently, scientists believed that a brain region called the hypothalamus makes us thirsty when it detects a drop in the hydration of our blood. (2019-03-27)
The salt-craving neurons
Pass the potato chips, please! New research discovers neural circuits that regulate craving and satiation for salty tastes. (2019-03-27)
Thirst controlled by signal from the gut
Scientists have discovered a new way that the gut talks to the brain, by sending messages about the salt content of the stomach and intestines. (2019-03-27)
Quick thinking? It's all down to timing
Synaptic plasticity, which underlies learning and memory, involves the strengthening and weakening of synapses. (2019-03-26)
Mouse study examines the underpinnings of hallucinations
In a study publishing March 26 in the journal Cell Reports, researchers looked at how a hallucinogenic drug impacts the brains of mice at the level of individual neurons. (2019-03-26)
When neurons are out of shape, antidepressants may not work
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed medication for major depressive disorder (MDD), yet scientists still do not understand why the treatment does not work in nearly thirty percent of patients with MDD. (2019-03-22)
Like mountaineers, nerves need expert guidance to find their way
Similar to the dozens of Sherpas that guide hikers up treacherous Himalayan mountains to reach a summit, the nervous system relies on elaborate timing and location of guidance cues for neuronal axons--threadlike projections--to successfully reach their destinations in the body. (2019-03-22)
Blue Brain solves a century-old neuroscience problem
In a front-cover paper published in Cerebral Cortex, EPFL's Blue Brain Project, a Swiss Brain Research Initiative, explains how the shapes of neurons can be classified using mathematical methods from the field of algebraic topology. (2019-03-21)
Organic semiconductors: One transistor for all purposes
In mobiles, fridges, planes - transistors are everywhere. But they often operate only within a restricted current range. (2019-03-21)
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