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Current Neurons News and Events, Neurons News Articles.
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Virginia Tech scientists reveal brain tumors impact normally helpful cells
Unprovoked recurrent seizures are a serious problem affecting most patients who suffer from glioma, a primary brain tumor composed of malignant glial cells. (2020-04-06)
Follow your gut
We may try to consciously make good food choices, but our bodies have their own way of weighing in. (2020-04-06)
Anterior insula activation restores prosocial behavior in animal model of opioid addiction
Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology have shown that chemogenetic activation of the anterior insula restores prosocial behavior in an animal model of opioid addiction and empathy. (2020-04-03)
Single mutation leads to big effects in autism-related gene
A new study in Neuron offers clues to why autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is more common in boys than in girls. (2020-04-02)
The facial expressions of mice
The face of a mouse reveals its emotions. (2020-04-02)
Gut communicates with the entire brain through cross-talking neurons
You know that feeling in your gut? We think of it as an innate intuition that sparks deep in the belly and helps guide our actions, if we let it. (2020-04-02)
Scientists show how parasitic infection causes seizures, psychiatric illness for some
In a new study published in GLIA , Virginia Tech neuroscientists at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC describe how the common Toxoplasma gondii parasite prompts the loss of inhibitory signaling in the brain by altering the behavior of nearby cells called microglia. (2020-04-02)
How dopamine drives brain activity
Using a specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensor that can track dopamine levels, MIT neuroscientists have discovered how dopamine released deep within the brain influences distant brain regions. (2020-04-01)
Needing a change? Researchers find GABA is the key to metamorphosis
Researchers led by the University of Tsukuba found that the neurotransmitter GABA is an essential regulator of metamorphosis in the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. (2020-03-31)
Autophagy: Scientists discover novel role for self-recycling process in the brain
Proteins classically associated with autophagy regulate the speed of intracellular transport. (2020-03-31)
Scientists identify gene that first slows, then accelerates, progression of ALS in mice
Columbia scientists have provided new insights into how mutations in a gene called TBK1 cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive neurodegenerative disease that robs patients of movement, speech and ultimately, their lives. (2020-03-27)
Gene mutation enhances cognitive flexibility in mice, NIH study suggests
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered in mice what they believe is the first known genetic mutation to improve cognitive flexibility -- the ability to adapt to changing situations. (2020-03-27)
Jumping genes help make neurons in a dish
The conversion of skin cells into brain cells relies on proper insertion of L1 elements. (2020-03-26)
New imaging method sheds light on Alzheimer's disease
To understand what happens in the brain when Alzheimer's disease develops, researchers need to be able to study the molecular structures in the neurons affected by Alzheimer's disease. (2020-03-25)
A molecule that directs neurons
A research team coordinated by the University of Trento studied a mass of brain cells, the habenula, linked to disorders like autism, schizophrenia and depression. (2020-03-24)
To sleep deeply: The brainstem neurons that regulate non-REM sleep
University of Tsukuba researchers identified neurons that promote non-REM sleep in the brainstem in mice. (2020-03-23)
Stem cells and nerves interact in tissue regeneration and cancer progression
Researchers at the University of Zurich show that different stem cell populations are innervated in distinct ways. (2020-03-23)
Lactation changes how mom's neurons communicate -- but it's reversible
Lactation temporarily changes how a mother's neurons behave, according to new research in mice published in JNeurosci. (2020-03-23)
New brain reading technology could help the development of brainwave-controlled devices
A new method to accurately record brain activity at scale has been developed by researchers at the Crick, Stanford University and UCL. (2020-03-20)
Researchers find key to keep working memory working
Working memory, the ability to hold a thought in mind even through distraction, is the foundation of abstract reasoning and a defining characteristic of the human brain. (2020-03-19)
Genetically engineering electroactive materials in living cells
Merging synthetic biology and materials science, researchers genetically coaxed specific populations of neurons to manufacture electronic-tissue 'composites' within the cellular architecture of a living animal, a new proof-of-concept report reveals. (2020-03-19)
Stanford scientists program cells to carry out gene-guided construction projects
The researchers developed a technique called genetically targeted chemical assembly, or GTCA, which they used to assemble electronically active biopolymer meshes on mammalian brain cells and on neurons in C. elegans. (2020-03-19)
High-speed microscope captures fleeting brain signals
UC Berkeley neuroscientists can now capture millisecond electrical changes in neurons in the cortex of an alert mouse, allowing tracing of neural signals, including subthreshold events, in the brain. (2020-03-19)
Rapid, automatic identification of individual, live brain cells
Generalized brain atlases, so-called connectome maps, are still no help for identifying neurons in individual, live, wriggling worms. (2020-03-18)
NCAM2 protein plays a decisive role in the formation of structures for cognitive learning
The molecule NCAM2, a glycoprotein from the superfamily of immunoglobulins, is a vital factor in the formation of the cerebral cortex, neuronal morphogenesis and formation of neuronal circuits in the brain, as stated in the new study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex. (2020-03-13)
How brain cells lay down infrastructure to grow and create memories
Research published today in Science Advances sheds new light on the molecular machinery that enables the shape, growth and movement of neurons. (2020-03-13)
The need for speed
Scientists at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore show that parallel neural pathways that bypass the brain's tight frequency control enable animals to move faster. (2020-03-12)
Protective brain-cell housekeeping mechanism may also regulate sleep
An important biological mechanism that is thought to protect brain cells from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's may also be involved in regulating sleep, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (2020-03-12)
'Zombie' brain cells develop into working neurons
Preventing the death of neurons during brain growth means these 'zombie' cells can develop into functioning neurons, according to research in fruit flies from the Crick, the University of Lausanne (UNIL) and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology. (2020-03-11)
BIN1 deficit impairs brain cell communication, memory consolidation
A new study has discovered that a lack of neuronal protein BIN1 leads to a defect in the transmission of chemical messages that activate brain cell communication allowing us to think, remember and behave. (2020-03-11)
Stanford scientists discover the mathematical rules underpinning brain growth
'How do cells with complementary functions arrange themselves to construct a functioning tissue?' said study co-author Bo Wang, an assistant professor of Bioengineering. (2020-03-11)
Crosstalk captured between muscles, neural networks in biohybrid machines
A platform designed for coculturing a neurosphere and muscle cells allows scientists to capture the growth of neurons toward muscles to form neuromuscular junctions. (2020-03-10)
Scientists categorize neurons by the way the brain jiggles during a heartbeat
The brain jiggles when the heart beats, and now, researchers have found a way to use that motion to better study the differences between types of neurons. (2020-03-10)
Sensory information underpins abstract knowledge
What we learn through our senses drives how knowledge is sorted in our brains, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-03-09)
Rats avoid to hurt other rats
In a new paper published in the leading scientific journal Current Biology, a team of neuroscientists of the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience shows that male and female rats show harm aversion. (2020-03-05)
Triglycerides control neurons in the reward circuit
Energy-dense food, obesity and compulsive food intake bordering addiction: the scientific literature has been pointing to connections between these for years. (2020-03-05)
Mapping movement
Our day-to-day lives can be seen as a series of complex motor sequences: morning routines, work or school tasks, actions we take around mealtimes, the rituals and habits woven through our evenings and weekends. (2020-03-05)
Neither nature nor nurture: Behavioral individuality in fruit flies' neurodevelopmental origin
While some fruit flies wander, others prefer to walk the straight and narrow; the origin of these behavioral quirks in individual flies may be a product of random variation in how neural circuits are wired during brain development, a new study of fruit flies given 'lines to walk' finds. (2020-03-05)
The origin of satiety: Brain cells that change shape after a meal
You just finished a good meal and are feeling full? (2020-03-03)
How our brains create breathing rhythm is unique to every breath
Breathing propels everything we do -- so its rhythm must be carefully organized by our brain cells, right? (2020-03-03)
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