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Current Neurons News and Events

Current Neurons News and Events, Neurons News Articles.
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Eating more ketones may fight against Alzheimer's disease
A ketone-supplemented diet may protect neurons from death during the progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci. (2019-12-09)
Dendrites filtering neuron's excitement
Kyoto University research shows that Purkinje cell dendrites filter out signals to the Soma. (2019-12-06)
Scientists use crabs to validate popular method to identify unknown human brain neurons
A crab's nervous system could help scientists learn what causes single neurons in the human brain to become 'out of whack,' which can contribute to the development of neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease. (2019-12-06)
New ultra-miniaturized scope less invasive, produces higher quality images
Johns Hopkins engineers have created a new lens-free ultra-miniaturized endoscope, the size of a few human hairs in width, that is less bulky and can produce higher quality images. (2019-12-06)
More than a watchdog
Study in mice shows the nervous system not only detects the presence of Salmonella in the gut but actively stops the organism from infecting the body. (2019-12-05)
Scientists create 'epigenetic couch potato' mouse
A study in mice shows for the first time that epigenetics -- the molecular mechanisms that determine which genes are turned on or off -- plays a key role in determining an individual's innate drive to exercise. (2019-12-04)
A week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing in adult mice
New research reveals how a week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing sensitivity in adult mice long after the optimal window for auditory learning has passed. (2019-12-04)
World first as artificial neurons developed to cure chronic diseases
Artificial neurons on silicon chips that behave just like the real thing have been invented by scientists -- a first-of-its-kind achievement with enormous scope for medical devices to cure chronic diseases, such as heart failure, Alzheimer's, and other diseases of neuronal degeneration. (2019-12-03)
Neurodegenerative diseases may be caused by transportation failures inside neurons
Protein clumps are routinely found in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. (2019-12-03)
Why stress doesn't always cause depression
Rats susceptible to anhedonia, a core symptom of depression, possess more serotonin neurons after being exposed to chronic stress, but the effect can be reversed through amygdala activation, according to new research in JNeurosci. (2019-12-02)
Cerebral organoid model provides clues about how to prevent virus-induced brain cell death
Scientists have determined that La Crosse virus (LACV), which can cause inflammation of the brain in children, affects brain cells differently depending on their developmental stage. (2019-11-26)
KBRI team reduces neurodegeneration associated with dementia in animal models
Korean research team made up of Dr. Hyung-Jun Kim and Shinrye Lee of KBRI, and professor Kiyoung Kim of Soonchunhyang University, found a new molecular mechanism of suppressing neuronal toxicity associateded dementia and Lou Gehrig's disease. (2019-11-26)
NUS researchers use machine learning tools to reveal how memories are coded in the brain
These findings indicate that stable short-term memory information exists within a population of neurons with dynamic activity. (2019-11-26)
Environmental enrichment corrects errors in brain development
Environmental enrichment can partially correct miswired neurons in the visual pathway, according to research in mice recently published in eNeuro. (2019-11-25)
Why cigarettes initially feel disgusting and how this could help smokers quit
Scientists have pinpointed the cells responsible for nicotine aversion in the mouse brain in a finding that could help the development of better treatments to help smokers quit. (2019-11-25)
Transplanting human nerve cells into a mouse brain reveals how they wire into brain circuits
A team of researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen and Vincent Bonin (VIB-KU Leuven, Université libre de Bruxelles and NERF) showed how human nerve cells can develop at their own pace, and form highly precise connections with the surrounding mouse brain cells. (2019-11-21)
What leads to compulsive alcohol use? New experiments into binge drinking provide answers
New study from neuroscientists at Vanderbilt provides initial answers to long-standing scientific questions on what causes the transition from moderate to compulsive alcohol consumption - and what makes some drinkers particularly vulnerable to developing alcohol use disorders. (2019-11-21)
Researchers identify a molecular mechanism involved in Huntington's disease
Researchers from the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS) described a mechanism, the increase of proteinaceous synthesis, which takes part in the degeneration of the type of neurons that are affected in Huntington's disease, a genetic neurodegenerative disease. (2019-11-20)
To navigate, flies make flexible mental maps of the world
Flies use visual cues to finesse their mental maps of the environment. (2019-11-20)
Inflammatory processes drive progression of Alzheimer's and other brain diseases
Inflammation drives the progression of neurodegenerative brain diseases and plays a major role in the accumulation of tau proteins within neurons. (2019-11-20)
Neural compass
Harvard Medical School neuroscientists have decoded how visual cues can rapidly reorganize the activity of compass neurons in fruit flies to maintain an accurate sense of direction. (2019-11-20)
The difference between an expert's brain and a novice's
In learning new tasks, neuron networks in the brain of mice become more refined and selective. (2019-11-18)
New cell therapy improves memory and stops seizures following TBI
Researchers from the University of California, Irvine developed a breakthrough cell therapy to improve memory and prevent seizures in mice following traumatic brain injury. (2019-11-15)
U of M research discovers subcellular computations within the brain during decision-making
New University of Minnesota Medical School research suggests that during decision-making, neurons in the brain are capable of much more complex processing than previously thought. (2019-11-14)
Defining a new approach to treating Parkinson's disease
Scientists from the University of Cologne have contributed to identifying Cav2.3 as a new target for a promising specific therapy. (2019-11-12)
Scientists shed new light on neural processes behind learning and motor behaviours
Researchers have provided new insight into the neural processes behind movement and learning behaviours, according to a study published today in eLife. (2019-11-12)
UTSA researchers discover new pathways in brain's amygdala
The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) researchers are pioneering an innovative brain study that sheds light on how the amygdala portion of the brain functions and could contribute to a better understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression and Alzheimer's disease. (2019-11-12)
Specific neurons that map memories now identified in the human brain
Columbia neuroengineers have found the first evidence that individual neurons in the human brain target specific memories during recall. (2019-11-11)
The pathway to Parkinson's takes a surprising twist
A new study finds that neurons affected in Parkinson's disease can shut down without fully dying, allowing them to also switch off neighboring cells. (2019-11-11)
Fetal nicotine exposure harms breathing in infants
Exposure to nicotine during development inhibits the function of neurons controlling the tongue, according to research in newborn rats recently published in eNeuro. (2019-11-11)
Stress hormone helps control the circadian rhythm of brain cells
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have shown how the brain's circadian rhythm in rats is, among other things, controlled by the stress hormone corticosterone -- in humans called cortisol. (2019-11-08)
Self-cannibalizing mitochondria may set the stage for ALS development
Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered a new phenomenon in the brain that could explain the development of early stages of neurodegeneration that is seen in diseases such as ALS, which affects voluntary muscle movement such as walking and talking.  The discovery was so novel, the scientists needed to coin a new term to describe it: mitoautophagy, a collection of self-destructive mitochondria in diseased upper motor neurons of the brain that begin to disintegrate from within at a very early age. (2019-11-07)
Neuron circuitry from brain signals
A research team led by Kyoto University has developed a machine learning model that allows scientists to reconstruct neuronal circuitry by measuring signals from the neurons themselves. (2019-11-06)
Tiny transporters could deliver treatment to stroke patients
Swarms of nanoparticles which are 15,000 times smaller than a pinhead may be able to deliver vital drugs to the brain, offering new hope to patients in the early stages of a stroke. (2019-11-06)
Deep neural networks uncover what the brain likes to see
Researchers built deep artificial neural networks that can accurately predict the neural responses produced by a biological brain to arbitrary visual stimuli. (2019-11-04)
New research explains why people with Down syndrome have spatial memory problems
Professor Juan Lerma's group, from the UMH-CSIC Institute of Neurosciences, in Alicante (Spain), has identified the gene called GRIK1, fundamental in the balance between excitation and inhibition in the brain, as one of the causes for people with Down syndrome having spatial orientation problems. (2019-11-01)
A protein that pulls the brake on nerve growth
During embryonic development, nerve cells form thin, long extensions, which they use to wire up a complex network, the brain. (2019-10-31)
Are we 'brainwashed' during sleep?
A new study from Boston University, published in Science, is the first to illustrate that the brain's cerebrospinal fluid pulses during sleep, and that these motions are closely tied with brain wave activity and blood flow. (2019-10-31)
How are psychiatric disorders linked to infections during pregnancy?
Severe infections during pregnancy have been connected to a range of psychiatric disorders by different studies in humans and animals. (2019-10-30)
Artificial networks shed light on human face recognition
Our brains are so primed to recognize faces - or to tell people apart - that we rarely even stop to think about it, but what happens in the brain when it engages in such recognition is still far from understood. (2019-10-30)
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