Current Nuclear magnetic resonance News and Events

Current Nuclear magnetic resonance News and Events, Nuclear magnetic resonance News Articles.
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Stress in pregnancy may influence baby brain development
Infants' brains may be shaped by levels of stress their mother experiences during pregnancy, a brain scanning study has revealed. (2020-11-24)

Miniscule robots of metal and plastic
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a technique for manufacturing micrometre-long machines by interlocking multiple materials in a complex way. Such microrobots will one day revolutionize the field of medicine. (2020-11-24)

NSF's National Solar observatory predicts a large sunspot for Thanksgiving
On November 18 scientists from the US National Science Foundation's National Solar Observatory predicted the arrival of a large sunspot just in time for Thanksgiving. Using a special technique called helioseismology, the team has been ''listening'' to changing sound waves from the Sun's interior which beckon the arrival of a large sunspot. (2020-11-24)

Researchers develop low-cost, portable brain imaging scanner
Investigators have developed and tested a low-cost, compact, portable and low-power ''head only'' MRI scanner for brain tests. The scanner could allow for bedside brain imaging for patients or scanning in remote locations. (2020-11-24)

Magnetic brain waves to detect injury and disease
Researchers have designed a new Optically Pumped Magnetometer (OPM) sensor for magnetoencephalography (MEG). The sensor is smaller and more robust in detecting magnetic brain signals and distinguishing them from background noise than existing sensors. Benchmarking tests showed good performance in environmental conditions where other sensors do not work, and it is able to detect brain signals against background magnetic noise, raising the possibility of MEG testing outside a specialised unit. (2020-11-23)

Controlling fully integrated nanodiamonds
Physicists at Münster University have succeeded in fully integrating nanodiamonds into nanophotonic circuits and at the same time addressing several of these nanodiamonds optically. The study creates the basis for future applications in the field of quantum sensing schemes or quantum information processors. The results have been published in the journal Nano Letters. (2020-11-23)

UCF researcher zeroes in on critical point for improving superconductors
Developing a practical ''room temperature'' superconductor is a feat science has yet to achieve. However a UCF researcher and his colleagues are working to move this goal closer to realization by taking a closer look at what is happening in ''strange'' metals. The research was published recently in the journal Communications Physics - Nature. (2020-11-23)

Alternative gene control mechanism based on organization of DNA within nucleus
Researchers at the University of Tokyo have identified how the architecture of the cell nucleus can change gene activity in plants. This discovery reveals fundamental knowledge about genome regulation and points towards future methods for potentially manipulating the expression of many genes simultaneously. (2020-11-20)

Improving quantum dot interactions, one layer at a time
Osaka City University scientists and colleagues in Japan have found a way to control an interaction between quantum dots that could greatly improve charge transport, leading to more efficient solar cells. Their findings were published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-11-20)

Folding of SARS-CoV2 genome reveals drug targets -- and preparation for 'SARS-CoV3'
For the first time, an international research alliance has observed the RNA folding structures of the SARS-CoV2 genome with which the virus controls the infection process. Since these structures are very similar among various beta corona viruses, the scientists not only laid the foundation for the targeted development of novel drugs for treating COVID-19, but also for future occurrences of infection with new corona viruses that may develop in the future. (2020-11-20)

Confirming simulated calculations with experiment results
Dr Zi Yang MENG from Division of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Science, the University of Hong Kong (HKU), is pursuing a new paradigm of quantum material research that combines theory, computation and experiment in a coherent manner. Recently, he teamed up with Dr Wei LI from Beihang University, Professor Yang QI from Fudan University, Professor Weiqiang YU from Renmin University and Professor Jinsheng WEN from Nanjing University to untangle the puzzle of Nobel Prize-winning theory Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) phase. (2020-11-19)

Scientists develop a magnetic switch with lower energy consumption
Joint research conducted by the UAB has shown the ability to switch magnetizacion « on » and « off » using voltage in a new class of easy-to-fabricate materials containing nitrogen. These results, published in Nature Communications, may be used to reduce energy consumption in electronic technologies. (2020-11-18)

Study identifies reasons for soaring nuclear plant cost overruns in the US
MIT researchers have analyzed the causes of many cost overruns on new nuclear power plants in the US, which have soared in the past 50 years. The findings may help designers of new plants build in resilience to prevent such added costs. (2020-11-18)

Early details of brain damage in COVID-19 patients
Looking at six patients using a specialized magnetic resonance technique, researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found that COVID-19 patients with neurological symptoms show some of the same metabolic disturbances in the brain as other patients who have suffered oxygen deprivation from other causes, but there are also notable differences. (2020-11-18)

3D-printed, lifelike heart models could help train tomorrow's surgeons (video)
Full-size, realistic models of human organs could help surgeons train and practice before they cut into a patient. However, it's been challenging to make inexpensive models of a size, complexity and material that simulates human organs. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a way to 3D print a full-size model of a patient's own heart. (2020-11-18)

UIC researchers describe fundamental processes behind movement of magnetic particles
Researchers from the University of Illinois Chicago describe several fundamental processes associated with the motion of magnetic particles through fluids as they are pulled by a magnetic field. (2020-11-18)

Magnetic spray: Giving inanimate objects new bionergy
Recently, researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with the City University of Hong Kong (CityU), have developed an agglutinate, reprogrammable, disintegrable and biocompatible magnetic spray (M-spray) that can easily turn inanimate objects into millirobots. (2020-11-18)

Boosted signal
First introduced into wide use in the middle of the 20th century, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has since become an indispensable technique for examining materials down to their atoms, revealing molecular structure and other details without interfering with the material itself. (2020-11-16)

Manchester group discover new family of quasiparticles in graphene-based materials
After years of dedicated research a group of pioneering scientists led by Nobel Laureate Andre Geim have again revealed a phenomenon that is 'radically different from textbook physics' and this work has led to the discovery and characterisation of a new family of quasiparticles found in graphene-based materials. Called Brown-Zak fermions these extraordinary particles have the potential to achieve the Holy Grail of 2D materials by having ultra-high frequency transistors which can in turn produce a new generation of superfast electronic devices. (2020-11-13)

Light shed on the atomic resolution structure of phage DNA tube
Given that phages are able to destroy bacteria, they are of particular interest to science. Basic researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin are especially interested in the tube used by phages to implant their DNA into bacteria. In collaboration with colleagues from Forschungszentrum Jülich and Jena University Hospital, they have now revealed the 3D structure of this crucial phage component in atomic resolution. (2020-11-13)

Antiferromagnetic material's giant stride towards application
The quest for high throughput intelligent computing paradigms - for big data and artificial intelligence - and the ever-increasing volume of digital information has led to an intensified demand for high-speed and low-power consuming next-generation electronic devices. The 'forgotten' world of antiferromagnets (AFM), a class of magnetic materials, offers promise in future electronic device development and complements present-day ferromagnet-based spintronic technologies. (2020-11-12)

Chemists discover the structure of a key coronavirus protein
MIT chemists have determined the molecular structure of a protein found in the SARS-CoV-2 virus. This protein forms a cation-selective channel and plays a key role in the virus's ability to replicate itself. If researchers could devise ways to block this channel, they may be able to reduce the pathogenicity of the virus and interfere with viral replication. (2020-11-12)

Connecting two classes of unconventional superconductors
The understanding of unconventional superconductivity is one of the most challenging and fascinating tasks of solid-state physics. Different classes of unconventional superconductors share that superconductivity emerges near a magnetic phase despite the underlying physics is different. (2020-11-11)

New source of lymphatic system leak discovered in children with rare open heart surgery complication
Interventional radiologists with Nemours Children's Health System have identified a new source of abnormal lymphatic flow between the liver and the lungs that may be responsible for some cases of plastic bronchitis. Plastic bronchitis is a rare but serious late complication in patients with congenital heart disease who had Fontan surgery. A report detailing the discovery of this fluid leak, and successful treatment of two cases was published in European Heart Journal. (2020-11-11)

Luddy researchers develop framework to study brain connectivity in living organisms
A new study by IU researchers lays out a large medical analytics framework that can be used in neuroscience and neurology to study brain connectivity in living organisms. (2020-11-11)

Black hole or no black hole: On the outcome of neutron star collisions
A new study lead by GSI scientists and international colleagues investigates black-hole formation in neutron star mergers. Computer simulations show that the properties of dense nuclear matter play a crucial role, which directly links the astrophysical merger event to heavy-ion collision experiments at GSI and FAIR. These properties will be studied more precisely at the future FAIR facility. The results have now been published in Physical Review Letters. (2020-11-10)

Optogenetic stimulation improves alterations in Huntington's disease experimental models
A study led by researchers of the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) has characterized one of the neuronal circuits involved in the development of the Huntington's disease. The study, published in the journal eLife, shows in an animal model with the pathology, that optogenetic stimulation of the circuit causes improvements in the typical symptomatology of the disease. (2020-11-10)

Surrey helps to produce the world's first neutron-rich, radioactive tantalum ions
An international team of scientists have unveiled the world's first production of a purified beam of neutron-rich, radioactive tantalum ions. (2020-11-10)

Radioactive elements may be crucial to the habitability of rocky planets
The amount of long-lived radioactive elements incorporated into a rocky planet as it forms may be a crucial factor in determining its future habitability. That's because internal heating from the radioactive decay of the heavy elements thorium and uranium drives plate tectonics and may be necessary for the planet to generate a magnetic field. Earth's magnetic field protects the planet from solar winds and cosmic rays. (2020-11-10)

No matter the size of a nuclear party, some protons and neutrons will pair up and dance
No matter the size of a nuclear party, certain protons and neutrons will always pair up and dance, a new MIT study finds. The results will help map the workings within neutron stars and heavy radioactive nuclei. (2020-11-09)

A novel finding on Kabuki syndrome, a rare genetic disease
It has a long time since the cause of the disease has been identified: mutations of KMT2D gene codify for MLL4, a protein involved in the regulation of chromatin, which is the complex of proteins and nucleic acids contained in the nucleus of cells. However, research still has a long way to go to identify therapeutic approaches. An Italian team, coordinated by the University of Trento, has taken a step forward in this direction (2020-11-09)

Electrified magnets: researchers uncover a new way to handle data
The properties of synthesised magnets can be changed and controlled by charge currents as suggested by a study and simulations conducted by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Central South University in China. In the journal 'Nature Communications', the team reports on how magnets and magnetic signals can be coupled more effectively and steered by electric fields. This could result in new, environmentally friendly concepts for efficient communication and data processing. (2020-11-09)

Global fisheries could alleviate a global food emergency in extreme situations
A new international study argues that, if managed sustainably in advance, global fisheries could alleviate food shortages even after a nuclear war. (2020-11-09)

Novel therapy approach for hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia
A new method to treat hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia has proven highly selective in targeting lesions and effective in slowing tumor growth, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-11-08)

AI accurately detects radiographic sacroiliitis in axial spondyloarthritis
New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting, shows that an artificial intelligence-based analysis model, called an artificial neural network, enables accurate detection of definite radiographic sacroiliitis in people with axial spondyloarthritis, an advance that could be useful for both diagnosis in the clinic and classification of patients for inclusion in clinical trials. (2020-11-06)

Scientists design magnets with outstanding properties
An international team of researchers led by the Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal (UMR 5031, CNRS -University of Bordeaux) has discovered a novel way to design magnets with outstanding physical properties, which could make them complementary to, or even competitive with traditional inorganic magnets, which are widely used in everyday appliances. (2020-11-06)

A new candidate material for quantum spin liquids
Using a unique material, EPFL scientists have been able to design and study an unusual state of matter, the Quantum Spin Liquid. The work has significant implications for future technologies, from quantum computing to superconductivity and spintronics. (2020-11-06)

Investigating optical activity under an external magnetic field
A new study published in EPJ B by Chengping Yin, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China, aims to derive an analytical model of optical activity in black phosphorous under an external magnetic field. (2020-11-06)

Lead-free magnetic perovskites
Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, working with the perovskite family of materials have taken a step forwards and developed an optoelectronic magnetic double perovskite. The discovery opens the possibility to couple spintronics with optoelectronics for rapid and energy-efficient information storage. (2020-11-06)

Trehalose 6-phosphate promotes seed filling by activating auxin biosynthesis
Plants undergo several developmental transitions during their life cycle. The differentiation of the young embryo from a meristem like structure into a highly specialized storage organ, is believed to be controlled by local connections between sugars and hormonal response systems. By modulating the trehalose 6?phosphate (T6P) content in growing embryos of pea (Pisum sativum), an international research team led by the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) investigated the role of this signaling sugar during the seed?filling process. (2020-11-05)

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