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Current Nuclear News and Events

Current Nuclear News and Events, Nuclear News Articles.
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The broken mirror: Can parity violation in molecules finally be measured?
Scientists have long tried to experimentally demonstrate a certain symmetry property of the weak interaction - parity violation -- in molecules. (2020-06-03)
HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus collectively through the nuclear endocytosis-like pathway
How HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus through the undersized nuclear pore remains mysterious. (2020-06-01)
Finnish researchers have discovered a new type of matter inside neutron stars
A Finnish research group has found strong evidence for the presence of exotic quark matter inside the cores of the largest neutron stars in existence. (2020-06-01)
A special elemental magic
Kyoto University physicists develop a 'nuclear periodic table'. While the traditional table is based on the behavior of electrons in an atom, this new table is based on the protons in the nucleus. (2020-05-27)
New method reveals where DNA is at risk in the cell
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new sequencing method that makes it possible to map how DNA is spatially organised in the cell nucleus -- revealing which genomic regions are at higher risk of mutation and DNA damage. (2020-05-26)
Ozone disinfectants can be used to sterilize cloth and n95 masks against COVID-19
Ozone gas has been shown to kill the SARS coronavirus in at least seventeen separate studies [1, 2]. (2020-05-26)
Study identifies the mechanism by which eating fish reduces risk of cardiovascular disease
Researchers of Universitat Rovira I Virgili and Harvard Medical School have demonstrated the association between the consumption of omega 3 and the reduction in the risk of suffering cardiovascular events through the analysis of lipoprotein samples from 26,034 women, the largest and most detailed study ever carried out. (2020-05-21)
Capturing the coordinated dance between electrons and nuclei in a light-excited molecule
Using SLAC's high-speed 'electron camera,' scientists simultaneously captured the movements of electrons and nuclei in a light-excited molecule. (2020-05-21)
Going nuclear on the moon and Mars
It might sound like science fiction, but scientists are preparing to build colonies on the moon and, eventually, Mars. (2020-05-20)
Potentially treatable genetic mutations revealed in subset of prostate cancer patients
Prostate cancer patients resistant to PSMA-targeted therapy often have potentially treatable mutations in their DNA damage-repair genes, according to research published in the May issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-05-20)
Molecular imaging offers insight into therapy outcomes for neuroendocrine tumor patients
A new proof-of-concept study published in the May issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine has demonstrated that molecular imaging can be used for identifying early response to 177Lu-DOTATATE treatment in neuroendocrine tumor patients. (2020-05-14)
Cold War nuke tests changed rainfall
Historic records from weather stations show that rainfall patterns in Scotland were affected by charge in the atmosphere released by radiation from nuclear bomb tests carried out in the 1950s and '60s. (2020-05-13)
X-ray imaging of atomic nuclei
Optically imaging atomic nuclei is a long-sought goal for scientific and applied research, but it has never been realized so far. (2020-05-13)
Study suggests polymer composite could serve as lighter, non-toxic radiation shielding
A new study suggests that a polymer compound embedded with bismuth trioxide particles holds tremendous potential for replacing conventional radiation shielding materials, such as lead. (2020-05-11)
Novel radiotracer meets gold standard for imaging prostate cancer
The novel radiopharmaceutical 18F-PSMA-1007 is both effective and readily available for detecting malignant prostate cancer lesions, according to research published in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-05-08)
Researchers pave the way to designing omnidirectional invisible materials
Researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), belonging to the Nanophotonics Technology Center, have taken a new step in designing omnidirectional invisible materials. (2020-05-07)
CCNY physicists shed light on the nanoscale dynamics of spin thermalization
In physics, thermalization, or the trend of sub-systems within a whole to gain a common temperature, is typically the norm. (2020-05-07)
Spin-dependent processes in the 2D material hexagonal boron nitride
Quantum technology was once considered to be something very expensive and available only to the largest research centers. (2020-05-06)
Study reveals single-step strategy for recycling used nuclear fuel
A typical nuclear reactor uses only a small fraction of its fuel rod to produce power before the energy-generating reaction naturally terminates. (2020-05-04)
Energy generated on offshore wind turbine farms, and conveyed ashore as hydrogen fuel
Researchers at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Engineering -Vitoria-Gasteiz have proposed using the energy generated on offshore wind turbine farms to produce hydrogen in situ instead of conveying it ashore by cable. (2020-04-30)
Catching nuclear smugglers: Fast algorithm could enable cost-effective detectors at borders
A new algorithm could enable faster, less expensive detection of weapons-grade nuclear materials at borders, quickly differentiating between benign and illicit radiation signatures in the same cargo. (2020-04-30)
Are salt deposits a solution for nuclear waste disposal?
Researchers testing and modeling to dispose of the current supply of waste. (2020-04-29)
'Wobble' may precede some great earthquakes, study shows
The land masses of Japan shifted from east to west to east again in the months before the strongest earthquake in the country's recorded history, a 2011 magnitude-9 earthquake that killed more than 15,500 people, new research shows. (2020-04-29)
Researchers find new insights linking cell division to cancer
Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) published research in the journal Nature extending our understanding of the intricate process of cell division. (2020-04-29)
Travel considerations specified for 177Lu-DOTATATE radiation therapy patients
Researchers and patient advocates have addressed the challenges related to traveling after receiving 177Lu-DOTATATE radiation therapy in a study published in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-04-27)
MSU professor collaborates with international colleagues in Review of Modern Physics journal article
MSU Professor Alexandra Gade collaborated with international colleagues for a Review of Modern Physics article about shell evolution of exotic nuclei. (2020-04-22)
Why relying on new technology won't save the planet
Why relying on new technology won't save the planet Overreliance on promises of new technology to solve climate change is enabling delay, say researchers from Lancaster University. (2020-04-20)
Supercomputers and Archimedes' law enable calculating nanobubble diffusion in nuclear fuel
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have proposed a method that speeds up the calculation of nanobubble diffusion in solid materials. (2020-04-20)
Cold War nuclear bomb tests reveal true age of whale sharks
Atomic bomb tests conducted during the Cold War have helped scientists for the first time correctly determine the age of whale sharks. (2020-04-06)
How old are whale sharks? Nuclear bomb legacy reveals their age
Nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War in the 1950s and 1960s have helped scientists accurately estimate the age of whale sharks, the biggest fish in the seas, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-04-06)
New molecular mechanism that regulates the sentinel cells of the immune system
CNIC scientists have uncovered a new molecular mechanism that determines the identity and expansion of one of the cell types that work as immune sentinels in the body -- the macrophages of the serous cavities. (2020-04-03)
Story tips: Molding matter atom by atom and seeing inside uranium particles
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Molding matter atom by atom and seeing inside uranium particles (2020-04-02)
Global nuclear medicine community shares COVID-19 strategies and experiences
In an effort to provide safer working environments for nuclear medicine professionals and their patients, clinics across five continents have shared their approaches to containing the spread of COVID-19 in a series of editorials, published ahead of print in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-04-01)
Total-body PET imaging successfully identifies antibodies up to 30 days after injection
Combining 89Zr-labeled antibodies with total-body positron emission tomography (PET) has extended the utility of novel total-body PET scanners, providing suitable images up to 30 days after the initial injection, according to research published in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-03-31)
Argonne and CERN weigh in on the origin of heavy elements
Nuclear physicists from Argonne National Laboratory led an international physics experiment conducted at CERN that utilizes novel techniques developed at Argonne to study the nature and origin of heavy elements in the universe. (2020-03-30)
The pros and cons of radiotherapy: Will it work for you?
Women undergoing radiotherapy for many cancers are more likely than men to be cured, but the side effects are more brutal, according to one of Australia's most experienced radiation oncology medical physicists. (2020-03-29)
Bricks can act as 'cameras' for characterizing past presence of radioactive materials
Researchers have developed a technique for determining the historical location and distribution of radioactive materials, such as weapons grade plutonium. (2020-03-26)
Oncotarget Roscovitine enhances all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced nuclear enrichment
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 12 reported that using the HL-60 human non-APL AML model where ATRA causes nuclear enrichment of c-Raf that drives differentiation/G0-arrest, the research team now observe that roscovitine enhanced nuclear enrichment of certain traditionally cytoplasmic signaling molecules and enhanced differentiation and cell cycle arrest. (2020-03-26)
High-resolution PET/CT assesses brain stem function in patients with hearing impairment
Novel, fully digital, high-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging of small brain stem nuclei can provide clinicians with valuable information concerning the auditory pathway in patients with hearing impairment, according to a new study published in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2020-03-25)
Researchers detail how antineutrino detectors could aid nuclear nonproliferation
The article appears in the latest issue of Reviews of Modern Physics. (2020-03-19)
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