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Current Nursing homes News and Events, Nursing homes News Articles.
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Study finds certain drugs used to treat eye diseases excreted into human breast milk
Ranibizumab and aflibercept are medications used to treat several retinal diseases. (2019-09-13)
Heart attack patients take longer to call emergency when symptoms are gradual
Heart attack symptoms can be gradual or abrupt and both situations are a medical emergency. (2019-09-12)
Academics call for structured drug monitoring in care homes
Swansea University academics call for policy makers, regulators and healthcare professionals to adopt a structured medicine monitoring system after research showed a positive impact on the care of people living in care homes and taking mental health medicines. (2019-09-12)
Researchers identify negative impacts of food insecurity on children's health
A new paper by researchers at the Boston University School of Social Work and American University's School of Public Affairs confirms the negative impact of food insecurity on child health, suggesting the urgent need for policies to combat this problem. (2019-09-09)
Social networking sites affect nurses' performance
Addiction to social networking sites reduces nurses' performance and affects their ability to concentrate on assigned tasks, according to a study published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing. (2019-09-05)
Study reveals links between extreme weather events and poor mental health
People with homes damaged by extreme weather events are more likely to experience mental health issues such as depression and anxiety even when the damage is relatively minor and does not force them to leave their homes, a new study suggests. (2019-09-05)
Financial education programs, income-based repayment plans promote prosperity
Financial education programs and income-based repayment plans help young adults with student loan debt prosper after college, according to a study led by University of Illinois social work professor Min Zhan. (2019-09-05)
First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives
By analyzing the fossilized teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, a team of scientists led by the universities of Bristol (UK) and Lyon (France) have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives. (2019-08-29)
Microbiota in home indoor air may protect children from asthma
Large amounts of a certain type of bacteria, most likely from outdoors, may reduce the child's risk of developing asthma. (2019-08-28)
Yet another way dogs help the military; aeromedical patient evacuations
Animal-assisted therapy has many benefits in health care. Yet, its biological and psychosocial effects in the military are unknown, especially for injured, airlifted patients. (2019-08-22)
Montana examines best practices for wildfire adaptation and resilience
Montana State University's Dave McWethy is the lead author on a paper published in the journal Nature Sustainability that outlines best practices for social and ecological resilience in a Western landscape where wildfires are becoming inevitable. (2019-08-19)
Comparing your house to your neighbors' can lead to dissatisfaction
Satisfaction with your home can depend on its size compared to your neighbors' homes, according to new Iowa State University research. (2019-08-19)
'Hidden' data exacerbates rural public health inequities
While some of the data rural public health officials need to serve their communities and guide public health policy exists, that data is hard to access and use. (2019-08-18)
Study examines characteristics of older adults with moderately severe dementia
A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society has found that many characteristics among older adults with moderately severe dementia differ depending on whether they live at home or in residential care or nursing facilities. (2019-08-07)
Most seniors with dementia live at home, despite pain, anxiety, poor health
Contrary to popular belief, most older Americans with advancing dementia remain in their own homes -- many until they die. (2019-08-06)
Improving outcomes for sepsis patients
More than 1 million sepsis survivors are discharged annually from acute care hospitals in the United States. (2019-08-01)
Walkability is key: A look at greenspace use
New University of Arizona research suggests the key to getting more people to use public greenspaces may be making access to them easier and safer. (2019-07-31)
Goal-oriented rehab improves recovery in older adults
Goal-oriented, motivational physical and occupational therapy helps older patients recover more fully from broken hips, strokes and other ailments that land them in skilled nursing facilities for rehabilitation, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-07-31)
Study: Black students receive fewer warnings from teachers about misbehavior
University of Illinois social work professor Kate Wegmann found in a new study that black middle school students receive fewer warnings from their teachers about misbehavior, giving them fewer opportunities to correct their behavior on their own before the consequences escalate to exclusionary punishments such as office referrals and expulsion. (2019-07-29)
Visits to the dentist decline in old age, especially among minorities
Visits to the dentist drop significantly after adults turn 80, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. (2019-07-24)
High blood pressure treatment and nursing home residents
A team of researchers designed a study to learn more about the best high blood pressure treatments for older adults who live in nursing homes. (2019-07-24)
Keeping livestock in the yard just might help your baby's immune system
Getting up close -- and a little dirty -- with farm animals just might help us fend off illness, say researchers who've further demonstrated the benefits of early exposure to a wide variety of environmental bacteria. (2019-07-23)
Are american nurses prepared for a catastrophe? New study says perhaps not
On average, American colleges and universities with nursing programs offer about one hour of instruction in handling catastrophic situations such as nuclear events, pandemics, or water contamination crises, according to two recent studies coauthored by a nursing professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-07-22)
Serious falls are a health risk for adults under 65
Adults who take several prescription medications are more likely to experience serious falls, say Yale researchers and their co-authors in a new study. (2019-07-22)
Neighborhood environment and health
It is well understood that urban black males are at a disproportionately high risk of poor health outcomes. (2019-07-17)
One in 270 births have 'dual burden' of prematurity and severe maternal complications
A quarter of women who have serious maternal complications during childbirth also have premature births, posing a 'dual burden' on families, finds research from NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) California Preterm Birth Initiative, and Stanford University. (2019-07-17)
Improving care quality for hospitalized socially at-risk patients
Nurses play a pivotal role in caring for hospitalized patients with social risk factors and preparing them for discharge. (2019-07-12)
Too much screen time for the kids? Grandparents may also be complicit
A new study by Rutgers and other researchers finds that today's grandparents are still true to their traditional fun-loving image -- allowing their grandchildren, while under their supervision, to spend about half of their time on a mobile phone, tablet, computer or TV. (2019-07-08)
What do sick kids really want in hospital?
Researchers at ECU's School of Nursing developed the 'Needs of Children Questionnaire' (NCQ), the first of its kind to measure children's self-reported psychosocial, physical and emotional needs in paediatric wards. (2019-07-02)
Catheters: Big source of infection, but often overlooked
Indwelling devices like catheters cause roughly 25% of hospital infections, but ongoing efforts to reduce catheter use and misuse haven't succeeded as much as health care workers would like. (2019-07-01)
WVU researcher studies how nursing homes can accommodate obese residents
West Virginia University researcher Nicholas Castle is part of a team investigating how nursing homes can best meet obese residents' healthcare needs. (2019-07-01)
New data resource reveals highly variable staffing at nursing homes
Researchers who analyzed payroll-based staffing data for US nursing homes discovered large daily staffing fluctuations, low weekend staffing and daily staffing levels that often fall well below the expectations of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), all of which can increase the risk of adverse events for residents. (2019-07-01)
Dissemination of pathogenic bacteria by university student's cell phones
New research has demonstrated the presence of S. aureus in 40% of the cell phones of students sampled at a university. (2019-06-21)
Nursing home care cost significantly outpaces general inflation and medical care prices
One of the largest studies on out-of-pocket costs for nursing home care finds prices are high and rising faster than other medical care and consumer prices, reports a team of health policy researchers. (2019-06-20)
UToledo research links fracking to higher radon levels in Ohio homes
A new study at The University of Toledo connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US. (2019-06-18)
Farm-like indoor microbiota may protect children from asthma also in urban homes
A child's risk of developing asthma is the lower the more the microbiota of the child's home resembles that of a farm house. (2019-06-17)
Using data to decide when to transfer patients by medical helicopter
A Cleveland, Ohio nursing scientist is leading a study he believes will support what he says is a much-needed change in how medical helicopters are used -- especially for transfers between hospitals. (2019-06-13)
Encouraging critically necessary blood donation among minorities
Better community education and communication are critical for increasing levels of blood donation among minorities, according to a study by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Southern University. (2019-06-13)
How nurses bring clarity to the nature of social change
History provides an enhanced understanding of the factors that inform social policy. (2019-06-11)
Supportive families and schools help prevent substance use among trans youth: UBC study
Strong family and school connections are helping prevent transgender youth from smoking cigarettes and using marijuana, even among those targeted by violence. (2019-06-10)
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