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Current Ocean acidification News and Events

Current Ocean acidification News and Events, Ocean acidification News Articles.
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Scientists first to develop rapid cell division in marine sponges
Despite efforts over multiple decades, there are still no cell lines for marine invertebrates. (2019-11-21)
HKUST researchers shed light on modulation of thermal bleaching of coral reefs by internal waves
An international research team led by an ocean scientist from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has demonstrated in a recent research paper the cooling impact of internal waves across depths on coral reefs, which has the potential to create thermal refuges for corals and is important for making more accurate predictions of coral bleaching. (2019-11-20)
Icebergs as a source of nutrients
The importance of icebergs as an important source of nutrients in the polar regions has long been discussed. (2019-11-20)
Underwater robotic gliders provide key tool to measure ocean sound levels
At a time when ocean noise is receiving increased global attention, researchers at Oregon State University have developed an effective method to use an underwater robotic glider to measure sound levels over broad areas of the sea. (2019-11-20)
Moss: a bio-monitor of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the Yangtze River Delta
The epilithic moss Haplocladium microphyllum can bio-monitor the rates and sources of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region, making up for the lack of monitoring data of N deposition. (2019-11-18)
Boosting wind farmers, global winds reverse decades of slowing and pick up speed
In a boon to wind farms, average daily wind speeds are picking up across much of the globe after about 30 years of gradual slowing. (2019-11-18)
The global distribution of freshwater plants is controlled by catchment characteristics
Unlike land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to CO2 to compensate for the low availability of CO2 in water. (2019-11-15)
Typhoons and marine eutrophication are probably the missing source of organic nitrogen in ecosystems
Atmospheric nitrogen deposition has a significant impact on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and alterations in its level will significantly affect the productivity and stability of an ecosystem. (2019-11-14)
Two ocean studies look at microscopic diversity and activity across entire planet
Two Cell papers use samples and data collected during the Tara Oceans Expedition to analyze current ocean diversity across the planet, providing a baseline to better understand climate change's impact on the oceans. (2019-11-14)
Going with the floe: Sea ice movements trace dynamics transforming the new Arctic
UC Riverside-led research is the first to use MODIS satellite imagery to understand long-term ocean movements from sea ice dynamics. (2019-11-14)
Something old, something new in the ocean's blue
Microbiologists at the Max Planck Institutes in Marburg and Bremen have discovered a new metabolic process in the ocean. (2019-11-13)
Tuna carbon ratios reveal shift in food web
The ratio of carbon isotopes in three common species of tuna has changed substantially since 2000, suggesting major shifts are also taking place in the phytoplankton populations that form the basis of the ocean's food web, according to a new international study involving Duke University researchers. (2019-11-13)
NASA's terra satellite sees fire and smoke from devastating bushfires in Australia
The state of New South Wales (NSW) in south eastern Australia is continuing to experience devastating bushfires due to the dry tinder-like atmosphere in the territory: high winds, dry lightning and continuing heat. (2019-11-13)
How giant kelp may respond to climate change
Like someone from Minnesota being dropped into an Arizona heat wave, giant kelp living in cooler, high-latitude waters were more vulnerable to excessive heat than kelp already living in warmer, Southern California waters, according to a study of Chilean and Californian kelp. (2019-11-13)
Nitrous oxide emissions set to rise in the Pacific Ocean
The acidification of the Pacific Ocean in northern Japan is increasing the natural production rate of N2O, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. (2019-11-12)
NASA finds a stronger Matmo headed for landfall
Matmo strengthened from a tropical storm to a storm with hurricane-force in the overnight hours of Nov. (2019-11-08)
Investigation of oceanic 'black carbon' uncovers mystery in global carbon cycle
An unexpected finding published today in Nature Communications challenges a long-held assumption about the origin of oceanic black coal, and introduces a tantalizing new mystery: If oceanic black carbon is significantly different from the black carbon found in rivers, where did it come from? (2019-11-07)
Melting arctic sea ice linked to emergence of deadly virus in marine mammals
Scientists have linked the decline in Arctic sea ice to the emergence of a deadly virus that could threaten marine mammals in the North Pacific, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (2019-11-07)
Changes in high-altitude winds over the South Pacific produce long-term effects
In the past million years, the high-altitude winds of the southern westerly wind belt, which spans nearly half the globe, didn't behave as uniformly over the Southern Pacific as previously assumed. (2019-11-05)
NASA provides an infrared analysis of typhoon Halong
Typhoon Halong continued to strengthen in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. (2019-11-04)
Satellites are key to monitoring ocean carbon
Satellites now play a key role in monitoring carbon levels in the oceans, but we are only just beginning to understand their full potential. (2019-11-03)
Largest mapping of breathing ocean floor key to understanding global carbon cycle
The largest open-access database of the sediment community oxygen consumption and CO2 respiration is now available. (2019-10-29)
Genetics reveal pacific subspecies of fin whale
New genetic research has identified fin whales in the northern Pacific Ocean as a separate subspecies, reflecting a revolution in marine mammal taxonomy as scientists unravel the genetics of enormous animals otherwise too large to fit into laboratories. (2019-10-28)
Iron availability in seawater, key to explaining the amount and distribution of fish
A new paper led by ICTA-UAB researchers Eric Galbraith and Priscilla Le Mézo and published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science proposes that the available iron supply in large areas of the ocean is insufficient for most fish, and that -- as a result -- there are fewer fish in the ocean than there would be if iron were more plentiful. (2019-10-24)
81% of tuna catch comes from stocks at healthy levels, 15% require stronger management
Of the total commercial tuna catch worldwide, 81% came from stocks at 'healthy' levels of abundance, according to the October 2019 International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) Status of the Stocks report. (2019-10-24)
Scientists tout ocean protection progress, give road map for more
World governments and other leadership bodies are taking vital steps to protect the ocean but more progress is urgently needed, scientists reported today at the Our Ocean Conference. (2019-10-22)
Mystery solved: Ocean acidity in the last mass extinction
A new study led by Yale University confirms a long-held theory about the last great mass extinction event in history and how it affected Earth's oceans. (2019-10-21)
It really was the asteroid
Fossil remains of tiny calcareous algae not only provide information about the end of the dinosaurs, but also show how the oceans recovered after the fatal asteroid impact. (2019-10-21)
Catastrophic events carry forests of trees thousands of miles to a burial at sea
While studying sediments in the Bay of Bengal, an international team finds evidence dating back millions of years that catastrophic events likely toppled fresh trees from their mountain homes on a long journey to the deep sea. (2019-10-21)
Changes in photochemical reflectance index can be used to monitor crop condition
Currently, agriculture remains one of the most labor-intensive and vital sectors of human activity. (2019-10-17)
Strong storms can generate earthquake-like seismic activity
Researchers have discovered a new geophysical phenomenon where a hurricane or other strong storm can produce vibrations in the nearby ocean floor as strong as a magnitude 3.5 earthquake. (2019-10-16)
Achieving a safe and just future for the ocean economy
much attention has been given to the growth of the 'Blue Economy' -- a term which refers to the sustainable use of ocean and marine resources for economic growth, jobs, and improved livelihoods. (2019-10-15)
FSU research: Strong storms generating earthquake-like seismic activity
A Florida State University researcher has uncovered a new geophysical phenomenon where a hurricane or other strong storm can spark seismic events in the nearby ocean as strong as a 3.5 magnitude earthquake. (2019-10-15)
Two new porcelain crab species discovered
Two new symbiotic porcelain crab species have been described. One of them, from the South China Sea of Vietnam, inhabits the compact tube-like shelters built by the polychaete worm with other organisms. (2019-10-15)
NASA's Terra satellite catches a glimpse of a fleeting Ema
Tropical Storm Ema had a very short life, but NASA's Terra satellite caught a glimpse of the storm before it dissipated in the Central Pacific Ocean. (2019-10-15)
New tool enables Nova Scotia lobster fishery to address impacts of climate change
Researchers use long-term survey data sets and climate models to help fishing communities plan for a warmer ocean. (2019-10-11)
Study offers solution to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle
New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades. (2019-10-10)
Has global warming stopped? The tap of incoming energy cannot be turned off
A rapid increase in the global ocean heat content has been detected in observations during the warming slowdown period, at a rate of about 9.8 × 1021 J yr-1. (2019-10-10)
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite needed 3 orbits to see all of Super Typhoon Hagibis
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a composite visible image of the very large Super Typhoon Hagibis in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Oct. (2019-10-10)
Infectious disease in marine life linked to decades of ocean warming
New research shows that long-term changes in diseases in ocean species coincides with decades of widespread environmental change. (2019-10-09)
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