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Current Online dating News and Events

Current Online dating News and Events, Online dating News Articles.
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Weight stigma affects gay men on dating apps
Weight stigma is an issue for queer men using dating apps, says a new University of Waterloo study. (2019-10-08)
Limited seed availability, dry climate hamper post-wildfire forest recovery
A lack of tree seedling establishment following recent wildfires represents a crucial bottleneck limiting coniferous forest recovery in the western US, new University of Colorado Boulder-led research finds. (2019-10-02)
45,000 years ago in Sri Lanka: The oldest microlith technology in a rainforest setting
Microliths -- small, retouched stone tools -- found in a Sri Lankan cave are the earliest evidence of such advanced technology in South Asia, according to a study released October 2, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Oshan Wedage of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Germany and colleagues. (2019-10-02)
Researchers develop program aimed at reducing dating violence among students
A program developed to encourage healthy relationships and reduce dating violence was effective among early middle school students, according to results of a study published in the American Journal of Public Health by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2019-09-30)
Study explains molecular mechanism of botanical folk medicines used to treat hypertension
Common herbs, including lavender, fennel and chamomile, have a long history of use as folk medicines used to lower blood pressure. (2019-09-30)
Preserving old bones with modern technology
A team of University of Colorado Boulder anthropologists is out to change the way that scientists study old bones damage-free. (2019-09-26)
Northern France was already inhabited more than 650,000 years ago
The first evidence of human occupation in northern France has been put back by 150,000 years, thanks to the findings of a team of scientists from the CNRS and the Musée National d'Histoire Naturelle at the emblematic site of Moulin Quignon. (2019-09-17)
Extinction of Icelandic walrus coincides with Norse settlement
An international collaboration of scientists in Iceland, Denmark and the Netherlands has for the first time used ancient DNA analyses and C14-dating to demonstrate the past existence of a unique population of Icelandic walrus that went extinct shortly after Norse settlement some 1100 years ago. (2019-09-13)
Study examines patterns of violence among young urban males
This observational study of adolescent men in urban neighborhoods examined associations between social support, patterns of violence, and violence-related risk behaviors or protective factors that might mitigate them. (2019-09-13)
Students make neutrons dance beneath UC Berkeley campus
Nuclear reactors are still the primary source for strong neutron beams to create isotopes for geologic dating, radiography and medicine, but researchers at UC Berkeley have enlisted engineering students in building a tabletop neutron source that could be nearly as effective. (2019-09-11)
Teens who don't date are less depressed and have better social skills
Adolescents who were not in romantic relationships during middle and high school had good social skills and low depression, and fared better or equal to peers who dated. (2019-09-06)
Students who do not date are not social misfits
Prior research identified four distinct dating trajectories from 6th to 12th grade: Low, Increasing, High Middle School, and Frequent. (2019-09-05)
A face for Lucy's ancestor
Australopithecus anamensis is the earliest-known species of Australopithecus and widely accepted as the progenitor of 'Lucy's' species, Australopithecus afarensis. (2019-08-28)
More frequent wildfires in the boreal forest threaten previously protected soil carbon
University of Saskatchewan researchers have found that as major wildfires increase in Canada's North, boreal forests that have acted as carbon sinks for millennia are becoming sources of atmospheric carbon, potentially contributing to the greenhouse effect. (2019-08-21)
Biomolecular analyses of Roopkund skeletons show Mediterranean migrants in Indian Himalaya
A large-scale study conducted by an international team of scientists has revealed that the mysterious skeletons of Roopkund Lake -- once thought to have died during a single catastrophic event - belong to genetically highly distinct groups that died in multiple periods in at least two episodes separated by one thousand years. (2019-08-20)
Humans migrated to Mongolia much earlier than previously believed
Stone tools uncovered in Mongolia by an international team of archaeologists indicate that modern humans traveled across the Eurasian steppe about 45,000 years ago. (2019-08-16)
ASU researchers study largest impact crater in the US, buried for 35 million years
About 35 million years ago, an asteroid hit the ocean off the East Coast of North America. (2019-08-13)
Modern mating market values women more: Australian study
A new study by QUT researchers debunks some theories of sexual economics when it comes to the market value of women as they age. (2019-08-12)
New study in Science: Why humans in Africa fled to the mountains during the last ice age
People in Ethiopia did not live in low valleys during the last ice age. (2019-08-08)
Krypton reveals ancient water beneath the Israeli desert
Getting reliable precipitation data from the past has proven difficult, as is predicting regional changes for climate models in the present. (2019-07-31)
What compulsive dating-app users have in common
Loneliness and social anxiety is a bad combination for single people who use dating apps on their phones, a new study suggests. (2019-07-31)
Scientists use phone movement to predict personality types
RMIT University researchers have used data from mobile phone accelerometers -- the tiny sensors tracking phone movement for step-counting and other apps -- to predict people's personalities. (2019-07-23)
New study explains the molecular mechanism for the therapeutic effects of cilantro
Herbs, including cilantro, have a long history of use as folk medicine anticonvulsants. (2019-07-22)
Ancient Roman port history unveiled
A team of international researchers led by La Trobe University and the University of Melbourne have, for the first time worldwide, applied marine geology techniques at an ancient harbour archaeological site to uncover ancient harbour technologies of the first centuries AD. (2019-07-15)
Maize-centric diet may have contributed to ancient Maya collapse
Researchers look at the role of diet in the ability of the ancient Maya to withstand periods of severe climatic stress. (2019-07-02)
Puppy love: Choosing the perfect pooch poses challenges similar to dating
Indiana University psychologists who study relationship choice have found that when it comes to picking a canine companion, what people say they want in a dog isn't always in line with what they choose. (2019-06-25)
Thunderbolt of lightning, gamma rays exciting
University of Tokyo graduate student Yuuki Wada with colleagues from Japan discover a connection between lightning strikes and two kinds of gamma-ray phenomena in thunderclouds. (2019-06-25)
Foodie calls: Dating for a free meal (rather than a relationship)
New psychology research reveals 23-33% of women in an online study say they've engaged in a 'foodie call,' where they set up a date for a free meal. (2019-06-21)
Boomers back on the dating scene seek cosmetic procedures to put their best face forward
In today's dating world, singles make snap judgments about potential dates as fast as they can swipe. (2019-06-19)
Many choices seems promising until you actually have to choose
People faced with more options than they can effectively consider want to make a good decision, but feel they're unable to do so, according to the results of a novel study from the University at Buffalo. (2019-06-13)
Uncovering the hidden history of a giant asteroid
A massive 'hit-and-run' collision profoundly impacted the evolutionary history of Vesta, the brightest asteroid visible from Earth. (2019-06-11)
Ancient DNA from Roman and medieval grape seeds reveal ancestry of wine making
A grape variety still used in wine production in France today can be traced back 900 years to just one ancestral plant, scientists have discovered. (2019-06-10)
Exposing modern forgers
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a process that can provide conclusive evidence with regard to modern fakes of paintings, even in cases where the forger used old materials. (2019-06-04)
Dating app users may be more likely to control their weight in unhealthy ways
Use of dating apps may be associated with an increased risk of unhealthy weight control behaviors, including vomiting, laxative use, or diet pill use, a study in the open-access Journal of Eating Disorders suggests. (2019-05-30)
Researchers document the oldest known trees in eastern North America
A stand of bald cypress trees in North Carolina, including one least 2,624 years old, are the oldest known living trees in eastern North America and the oldest wetland tree species in the world. (2019-05-09)
Arctic rivers provide fingerprint of carbon release from thawing permafrost
The feedback between a warming climate and accelerated release of carbon currently frozen into permafrost around the Arctic is one of the grand challenges in current climate research. (2019-05-07)
First hominins on the Tibetan Plateau were Denisovans
So far Denisovans were only known from a small collection of fossil fragments from Denisova Cave in Siberia. (2019-05-01)
First examples of Iberian prehistoric 'imitation amber' beads at gravesites
Prehistoric Iberians created 'imitation amber' by repeatedly coating bead cores with tree resins, according to a study published May 1, 2019, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Carlos Odriozola from Universidad de Sevilla, Spain, and colleagues. (2019-05-01)
Middle Pleistocene human skull reveals variation and continuity in early Asian humans
A team of scientists led by LIU Wu and WU Xiujie from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first ever Middle Pleistocene human skull found in southeastern China, revealing the variation and continuity in early Asian humans. (2019-04-30)
Crusaders made love and war, genetic study finds
The first genetic study of ancient human remains believed to be Crusaders confirms that warriors travelled from western Europe to the near East, where they mixed and had families with local people, and died together in battle. (2019-04-18)
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