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Artificial intelligence can make personality judgments based on our photographs
Russian researchers from HSE University and Open University for the Humanities and Economics have demonstrated that artificial intelligence is able to infer people's personality from 'selfie' photographs better than human raters do. (2020-05-22)
Madagascar copal: New dating for an Antropocene ancient resin
The known Madagascar copal is a more recent resin from what was thought -it has about a few hundred years- and trapped pieces in this material are not as palaeontological important as thought traditionally. (2020-05-19)
Study finds people are more satisfied after quitting the status quo
A new paper in The Review of Economic Studies, published by Oxford University Press, finds that people who use a coin toss to decide on an important change are more likely to follow through with that decision, are more satisfied with that decision, and report a higher overall happiness after a six-month period. (2020-05-18)
Online romance scams: A modern form of fraud
This paper presents a scoping review of the quantitative and qualitative evidence on this issue, focusing on epidemiological aspects, relational dynamics, and the psychological characteristics of victims and scammers. (2020-05-15)
Portland State researcher develops new model to accurately date historic earthquakes
Three earthquakes in the Monterey Bay Area, occurring in 1838, 1890 and 1906, happened without a doubt on the San Andreas Fault, according to a new paper by a Portland State University researcher. (2020-05-14)
Ancient DNA unveils important missing piece of human history
Newly released genomes from Neolithic East Asia have unveiled a missing piece of human prehistory, according to a study conducted by Professor FU Qiaomei's team from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2020-05-14)
Chemical evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in Lesotho in the first millennium AD
After analyzing organic residues from ancient pots, a team of scientists led by the University of Bristol has uncovered new evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in the landlocked South African country of Lesotho in the mid-late first millennium AD. (2020-05-11)
Why the 'uplift of the Tibetan plateau' is a myth
Spicer and colleagues combine stable isotope and fossil paleoaltimetry to chart the growth of Tibet, the Himalaya and the Hengduan mountains through time and show the plateau is young, less that 15 million years old, and evolved not just by the collision of India with Eurasia but through multiple earlier mountain-building events and the infilling of deep ancient lowlands hosting subtropical monsoon-adapted biotas. (2020-05-09)
Fossil reveals evidence of 200-million-year-old 'squid' attack
Researchers say a fossil found on the Jurassic coast of southern England in the 19th century demonstrates the world's oldest known example of a squid-like creature attacking its prey. (2020-05-06)
Privacy worries prevent use of social media account for signing up for apps
People find it convenient to use Facebook or other social media accounts to sign up for most new apps and services, but they prefer to use their e-mail address or open a new account if they feel the information in the app is too sensitive, according to a team of researchers. (2020-04-25)
Papua New Guinea highland research redates Neolithic period
A new report published in Science Advances on the emergence of agriculture in highland Papua New Guinea shows advancements often associated with a later Neolithic period occurred about 1,000 years' earlier than previously thought. (2020-04-17)
Neanderthal cord weaver
Contrary to popular belief, Neanderthals were no less technologically advanced than Homo sapiens. (2020-04-09)
Revolutionary new method for dating pottery sheds new light on prehistoric past
A team from University of Bristol developed a new method to date archaeological pottery using fat residues remaining in the pot wall from cooking. (2020-04-08)
National online education platforms could make STEM degrees more affordable, Russia-based study shows
An online education model in Russia in which national platforms license STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) courses from top universities to institutions with instructor shortages could significantly lower instruction costs, allowing resource-constrained universities to enroll more STEM students, according to a new study. (2020-04-08)
How old are whale sharks? Nuclear bomb legacy reveals their age
Nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War in the 1950s and 1960s have helped scientists accurately estimate the age of whale sharks, the biggest fish in the seas, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-04-06)
Paleontology: Fossil trove sheds light on ancient antipodean ecology
The oldest known animals and plants preserved in amber from Southern Gondwana are reported in Scientific Reports this week. (2020-04-02)
In South Africa, three hominins, including earliest Homo erectus, lived during same period
Nearly 2 million years ago, three hominin genera -- Australopithecus, Paranthropus and the earliest Homo erectus lineage -- lived as contemporaries in the karst landscape of what is now South Africa, according to a new geochronological evaluation of the hominin fossil-rich Drimolen Paleocave complex. (2020-04-02)
Our direct human ancestor Homo erectus is older than we thought
A Homo erectus skullcap found northwest of Johannesburg in South Africa has been identified as the oldest to date, in research published in Science. (2020-04-02)
When three species of human ancestor walked the Earth
In a paper published this week in Science, an international team of scientists share details of the most ancient fossil of Homo erectus known and discuss how these new findings are forcing us to rewrite a part of our species' evolutionary history. (2020-04-02)
Prehistoric artifacts suggest a Neolithic era independently developed in New Guinea
New artifacts uncovered at the Waim archaeological site in the highlands of New Guinea -- including a fragment of the earliest symbolic stone carving in Oceania -- illustrate a shift in human behavior between 5,050 and 4,200 years ago in response to the widespread emergence of agriculture, ushering in a regional Neolithic Era similar to the Neolithic in Eurasia. (2020-04-01)
Prehistoric artifacts suggest a neolithic era independently developed in New Guinea
New artifacts uncovered at the Waim archaeological site in the highlands of New Guinea -- including a fragment of the earliest symbolic stone carving in Oceania -- illustrate a shift in human behavior between 5,050 and 4,200 years ago in response to the widespread emergence of agriculture, ushering in a regional Neolithic Era similar to the Neolithic in Eurasia. (2020-03-25)
Maize, not metal, key to native settlements' history in NY
New Cornell University research is producing a more accurate historical timeline for the occupation of Native American sites in upstate New York, based on radiocarbon dating of organic materials and statistical modeling. (2020-03-19)
Fine-tuning radiocarbon dating could 'rewrite' ancient events
A new paper led by Cornell University points out the need for an important new refinement to the technique. (2020-03-18)
Many teens are victims of digital dating abuse; boys get the brunt of it
It's almost Valentine's Day, but there is nothing romantic about new research illuminating how teen dating abuse is manifesting online. (2020-02-12)
Oral traditions and volcanic eruptions in Australia
In Australia, the onset of human occupation (about 65,000 years?) and dispersion across the continent are the subjects of intense debate and are critical to understanding global human migration routes. (2020-02-10)
Tinder a good example of how people use technology for more than we think
From multilevel marketing to political and health campaigning to promoting local gigs, Tinder users are appropriating the platform for their own purposes. (2020-02-06)
Prehistoric skeleton discovered in Southern Mexico
A prehistoric human skeleton found in southern Mexico is at least 10,000 years old and most likely dates from the end of the most recent ice age. (2020-02-05)
Wasp nests used to date ancient Kimberley rock art
Mud wasp nests collected from Kimberley sites with the permission of traditional owners help scientists establish ancient art rock unique to the area is 12,000 years old not 17,000 years old (2020-02-05)
Upper-plate earthquakes caused uplift along New Zealand's Northern Hikurangi Margin
Earthquakes along a complex series of faults in the upper plate of New Zealand's northern Hikurangi Subduction Margin were responsible for coastal uplift in the region, according to a new evaluation of local marine terraces. (2020-01-28)
APS tip sheet: Network dynamics of online polarization
Interaction dynamics reveals the mechanisms behind online polarization and social media echo chambers. (2020-01-27)
Machine learning greatly reduces uncertainty in understanding of paleozoic biodiversity
Previous analyses of global paleobiodiversity have been coarsely resolved to roughly 10 million years, obscuring the effects of ecological processes and events that operate at shorter timescales. (2020-01-16)
Dating a galaxy crash
A single star has provided information about the collision of the Milky Way with the dwarf galaxy Gaia-Enceladus. (2020-01-15)
Program proves effective in preventing dating violence with middle school students
Coaching Boys Into Men, a program that seeks to prevent dating violence and sexual assault, reduces abusive behaviors among middle school male athletes toward their female peers, according to clinical trial results published today in JAMA Pediatrics. (2020-01-13)
Always counterclockwise
Human behavior is influenced by many things, most of which remain unconscious to us. (2020-01-10)
Early humans arrived in Southeast Asia later than previously believed
New dates from the World Heritage archeological site at Sangiran on the island of Java suggest that that the first appearance of Homo erectus occurred more recently than previously thought, researchers report. (2020-01-09)
If trees could talk: Using historic log structures to map migration of Europeans, Native Americans
Researchers at West Virginia University are using tree-ring dating to determine not only when trees were cut down to build historic log buildings in the region but also what the forests were like before European immigrants arrived. (2020-01-07)
Boys who are bullied online may have more risky sex
Recent research suggests that adolescent boys who are cyber bullied pursue risky sexual behaviors more frequently than girls who are cyber bullied. (2020-01-06)
Progressive gender beliefs in teen boys may be protective against violence
Teenage boys who witness their peers abusing women and girls are much more likely to bully and fight with others, as well as behave abusively toward their dates, compared to teenage boys who don't witness such behaviors, according to a new analysis. (2019-12-27)
Researchers determine age for last known settlement by a direct ancestor to modern humans
An international team of researchers has determined the age of the last known settlement of the species Homo erectus, one of modern humans' direct ancestors. (2019-12-18)
Applying physics principle yields grim prediction on hurricane destruction in an era
Global warming could well lead to hurricanes more powerful than meteorologists currently forecast. (2019-12-17)
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