Current Opioid abuse News and Events

Current Opioid abuse News and Events, Opioid abuse News Articles.
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Obesity is not only the individual's responsibility
Analysis of survey results by Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine has revealed that in women, obesity is linked to various social and economic factors. In addition, this study is the first in Japan to illuminate the connection between abuse during childhood and obesity in adulthood. These results highlight the importance of taking these factors into account when implementing policies to tackle obesity. (2020-11-25)

Nurse practitioners play key role in opioid addiction treatment in very rural areas
Giving nurse practitioners the authority to prescribe buprenorphine has brought that gold standard treatment for opioid addiction to people who might not have had access to it before, according to a new study. Looking at prescription drug monitoring data in Oregon before and after 2017, when nurse practitioners and physician assistants gained the authority to prescribe buprenorphine, researchers found that nurse practitioners almost immediately had an impact on access to buprenorphine in rural Oregon. (2020-11-23)

Study: Opioid overdose deaths involving other substances more common in youth
Results of a new study show that opioid overdose deaths involving more than one substance (polysubstances) are more common than opioid-only overdose deaths among youth. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction, the data shows that cocaine and other stimulants like crystal methamphetamine are the substances most commonly involved in opioid overdose deaths in young people between the ages of 13 and 25. (2020-11-23)

Adverse childhood experiences and at-risk drinking, cannabis, and illicit drug use
New research from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation suggests that adverse childhood experiences, often referred to as child maltreatment, are associated with increased odds of substance use among women urban Emergency Department patients. (2020-11-22)

Screening may bypass one-quarter of child abuse cases
Up to one-quarter of people who suffer child sexual abuse might be passed over for treatment because of current screening procedures, according to UC Riverside psychology researchers. Their just-published study also finds that whether survivors of child sexual abuse identify themselves as abuse survivors influences the outcomes they experience in young adulthood. The study surveyed 2,195 undergraduate college students. (2020-11-21)

Limited access to buprenorphine restricts resident physicians treating opioid abusers
A University of South Florida Health-led survey of resident physicians in Florida indicates they are interested in treating opioid addiction but face barriers to offering patients treatment using buprenorphine, an FDA-approved medication shown to successfully decrease opioid use, overdose events, and deaths associated with opioids. Many states have reported increased deaths from opioids since the COVID-19 epidemic began, underscoring the need to remove barriers to care. (2020-11-20)

Artificial intelligence-based tool may help diagnose opioid addiction earlier
Researchers have used machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence, to develop a prediction model for the early diagnosis of opioid use disorder. The advance is described in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives. (2020-11-18)

UTSA researcher examines drug overdose mortality in the Hispanic community
UTSA researcher Manuel Cano, assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at UTSA is shedding light to understand the topic of drug overdose deaths in the Hispanic community. In the article ''Drug Overdose Deaths Among US Hispanics: Trends (2000-2017) and Recent Patterns'' published in ''Substance Use & Misuse'' Cano used national death certificate data (data recording all deaths of U.S. residents) to examine drug overdose mortality in different Hispanic subgroups, based on heritage, place of birth and gender. (2020-11-18)

'Meet people where they are:' local health departments key to hepatitis B vaccination
A study led by Stacy Tressler--who earned her doctorate in epidemiology from the West Virginia University School of Public Health--suggests that local health departments are vital to getting the hepatitis B vaccine to the people who need it most. (2020-11-17)

AI tool may predict movies' future ratings
Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, armed with artificial intelligence tools, can rate a movie's content in a matter of seconds, based on the movie script and before a single scene is shot. (2020-11-17)

OHIO's Franz publishes study on strategies hospitals adopt to address opioid epidemic
Ohio University professors Berkeley Franz, Ph. D., and assistant professor Cory Cronin, Ph.D., along with New York University professor José Pagán, Ph.D., co-authored the article, ''What Strategies Are Hospitals Adopting to Address the Opioid Epidemic? Evidence From a National Sample of Nonprofit Hospitals,'' to identify what hospitals are doing to combat the opioid epidemic and how they could better address these problems in communities. (2020-11-16)

Combined intimate partner violence that includes sexual violence is common & more damaging
Women who experience sexual violence combined with other forms of intimate partner violence suffer greater damage to their health and are much more likely to attempt suicide, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care published in the International Journal of Epidemiology today [12 November 2020]. (2020-11-12)

Model helps predict which infants may develop NAS
A new Vanderbilt-designed prediction model may make it easier to determine which infants will go on to develop neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), a drug withdrawal syndrome in newborns that occurs after exposure to opioids during pregnancy. (2020-11-12)

Calls to city 311 lines can predict opioid overdose hotspots
Service requests to city non-emergency telephone lines can help identify 'hotspots' for opioid use and overdoses, a study in Columbus found. Researchers found that calls to the 311 line - used in many cities across the United States to report non-emergency issues - tracked closely to places and times in Columbus in which opioid overdose events were on the rise. (2020-11-11)

Researchers light-up mouse brain, revealing previously hidden areas susceptible to opioids
New work at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University shows that kappa opioid receptors actually are distributed widely throughout the brain. The Temple researchers made this discovery after lighting up the brains of mice using a technique called CLARITY followed by three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent imaging. The study is the first to apply the imaging technique to better understand opioid receptor localization across the whole brain in 3D images. (2020-11-11)

Pediatric surgeon establishes first-ever guidelines for pediatric opioid prescribing
In addition to adults, opioid addiction and misuse affects the pediatric population. Pediatric surgeon forms group of health care providers and advocates to establish first ever pediatric opioid prescribing guidelines. (2020-11-11)

Taking a scalpel to opioid painkiller risks: New studies show progress and opportunity
Several new studies add to the understanding of risks from surgical opioids, and show what happens when surgical teams work together to reduce the emphasis on, and supply of, opioid painkillers while still seeking to ease surgery patients' pain. (2020-11-10)

Treating opioid addiction in primary care helps patients and cash-strapped medical practices
Buprenorphine-based treatment for opioid addiction is in short supply in many areas of the United States. And while many physicians want to offer it, clinics are unsure how to offer buprenorphine therapy in a financially sustainable way. (2020-11-10)

'Diseases of despair' have soared over past decade in US
'Diseases of despair', such as substance abuse, alcohol dependency, and suicidal thoughts and behaviours, have soared in the US over the past decade, reveals an analysis of health insurance claims data published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2020-11-09)

Discrimination increases against Asian and Asian American population, affecting health
Reports of racial discrimination against Asians and Asian-Americans have increased since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic hit the United States, coinciding with an increase in reported negative health symptoms, according to Washington State University researchers. (2020-11-02)

Americans agree: improving our public health system is an urgent priority
As COVID-19 infections escalate, Americans across the political divide demonstrate pronounced support for public health. According to a recently-commissioned survey by Research!America on behalf of a working group formed to address our nation's commitment to science, a strong bipartisan majority of Americans place an urgent or high priority on improving our nation's public health system (78%) (2020-10-29)

More than half of American adults with advanced MS report mistreatment by caregivers
Four in 10 people with advanced multiple sclerosis, or MS, are emotionally abused by someone responsible for caring for them, reports a study led by the University of California, Riverside. Further, the study finds one quarter are financially exploited, one in six are neglected, one in nine are battered, and one in 12 are sexually assaulted by a caregiver. (2020-10-27)

PTSD and alcohol abuse go hand-in-hand, but males and females exhibit symptoms differently
Through intricate experiments designed to account for sex-specific differences, scientists at Scripps Research have collaborated to zero-in on certain changes in the brain that may be responsible for driving alcohol abuse among people with PTSD. In studies with rodents, researchers found that males and females exhibit their own distinct symptoms and brain features of PTSD and alcohol use disorder. Such differences are not typically accounted for in laboratory-based studies yet could lead to more successful clinical treatments. (2020-10-23)

Opioid use disorder? Electronic health records help pinpoint probable patients
A new study suggests that patients with opioid use disorder may be identified using information available in electronic health records, even when diagnostic codes do not reflect this diagnosis. The study demonstrates the utility of proxies coding for DSM-5 criteria from medical records to generate a quantitative DSM-5 score that is associated with opioid use disorder severity. The study methods are unique in deriving a severity score that aims to mirror severity scores from more traditional interview-based diagnostic procedures. (2020-10-21)

Study finds lowering nicotine decreases addictiveness of smoking in vulnerable populations
A study in JAMA Network Open provides evidence that, even in smokers from vulnerable populations, reducing nicotine content to low levels decreases addictiveness - a timely finding as the Food and Drug Administration considers a policy to lower nicotine content in all cigarettes sold in the U.S. (2020-10-20)

From pills to powder: 1 in 3 high school seniors who misused prescription opioids later used heroin
Nearly one-third of students who reported misusing prescription opioids as high school seniors between 1997 and 2000, but did not have a history of medical use, later used heroin by age 35, according to a University of Michigan study. (2020-10-20)

Opioid prescriptions are rising in the U.K, with 14% of patients becoming long-term users
In the U.K., new prescriptions for multiple opioids have risen steadily in recent years, leading to concerning rates of long-term use, especially in older, socially deprived patients. Dr Meghna Jani at the University of Manchester and colleagues report these findings in a new study published October 15 in PLOS Medicine. (2020-10-15)

Maltreatment tied to higher inflammation in girls
New research by a University of Georgia scientist reveals that girls who are maltreated show higher levels of inflammation at an early age than boys who are maltreated or children who have not experienced abuse. (2020-10-14)

Cannabis use appears to encourage, not replace, non-medical opioid use
Contrary to some claims, people in the US may not be substituting cannabis for opioids, New research at Columbia examined the direction and strength of association between cannabis and opioid use among adults who used non-medical opioids. The findings showed that opioid use was at least as prevalent on days when cannabis was used as on days when it was not. The study is among the first to test opioid substitution directly. (2020-10-08)

Factors that increase or decrease suicidal behavior risk in adolescents
An analysis of relevant studies published to date has identified certain risk factors associated with suicidal behavior in adolescents. The analysis also revealed certain protective factors that may reduce the likelihood of suicidal behavior. (2020-10-07)

Stopping opioid-related addiction, harm and accidents after surgery
An international group of global experts including anaesthetists, surgeons and other healthcare professionals have come together to publish a consensus statement on the prevention of opioid-related harm in adult surgical patients. The consensus statement is published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists). (2020-10-07)

AI predicts patients at highest risk for severe pain, increased opioid use post-surgery
Artificial intelligence (AI) used in machine learning models can predict which patients are at highest risk for severe pain after surgery, and help determine who would most benefit from personalized pain management plans that use non-opioid alternatives, suggests new research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-04)

Significant decline in prescription opioid abuse seen among Americans at last
Almost 20 years into the opioid epidemic, there finally is evidence of significant and continual decreases in the abuse of these risky pain medications, according to an analysis of national data being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-03)

Study shows need for balance in post-surgery opioid prescribing guidelines
Opioid guidelines may be missing a small group of patients that need a greater level of pain control. (2020-10-03)

Pain relief caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection may help explain COVID-19 spread
New research shows SARS-CoV-2 promotes pain relief when it infects cells through a common protein receptor, neuropilin-1. The finding gives scientists a novel target for non-opioid pain therapeutics, while also offering an explanation for the unrelenting spread of COVID-19. (2020-10-01)

Study identifies shortcomings in FDA evaluations for new opioid drug approvals over two decades
Approvals of prescription opioids by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over more than two decades have been based on evaluations in narrowly defined patient groups for which certain safety-related outcomes have been rarely systematically assessed. (2020-09-29)

Pandemic sets off future wave of worsening mental health issues
Long after a COVID-19 vaccination is developed and years after the coronavirus death toll is tallied, the impact on mental health will linger, continuing to inflict damage if not addressed, according to new research. A psychology researcher at the University of Houston has published two papers discussing the psychological, addictive and health behavior issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic from a behavioral science perspective. (2020-09-28)

New study highlights success of a mobile outreach van helping people on the street w
Novel mobile health program has proven to be an effective model for bringing opioid addiction treatment services directly to marginalized individuals, particularly the homeless. (2020-09-25)

LBG individuals use stimulants at higher rates than heterosexuals
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals report higher rates of medical, non-medical, and illegal stimulant use compared to heterosexuals, mirroring patterns seen in other substance use. The study by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers provides the most detailed picture to date on stimulant use by LGB subgroups and gender. Findings are published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. (2020-09-24)

Alcohol, nicotine mix during pregnancy increases health risk in newborns
In the first study of its kind, University of Houston researchers are reporting that during early pregnancy, the mix of alcohol and nicotine significantly alters the gene regulatory pathways of the developing fetus, which can lead to major deficiencies in brain development. (2020-09-23)

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