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Current Orangutans News and Events, Orangutans News Articles.
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Research identifies regular climbing behavior in a human ancestor
A new study led by the University of Kent has found evidence that human ancestors as recent as two million years ago may have regularly climbed trees. (2020-03-30)
Reconstructing the diet of fossil vertebrates
Paleodietary studies of the fossil record are impeded by a lack of reliable and unequivocal tracers. (2020-02-17)
Researchers were not right about left brains
The left and right side of the brain are involved in different tasks. (2020-02-14)
Palm oil: Less fertilizer and no herbicide but same yield?
Environmentally friendlier palm oil production could be achieved with less fertilizer and no herbicide, while maintaining profits. (2019-11-05)
Leipzig primate researchers initiate global collaboration
In order to investigate evolutionary questions, scientists require the largest and most versatile samples possible. (2019-10-29)
Lend me a flipper
Researchers at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute, Kindai University, and Kagoshima City Aquarium investigated the cooperative abilities of dolphins. (2019-10-28)
Using past extinctions to drive future conservation
A growing suite of tools is providing fine-grain detail into the historic ranges and population dynamics of large animals. (2019-10-02)
Great apes have you on their mind
For decades a fierce debate was raised on whether any nonhuman species possess the ability of 'Theory of Mind'. (2019-09-30)
NUS study reveals similarities in human, chimpanzee, and bonobo eye colour patterns
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have revealed that chimpanzees and bonobos share the contrasting colour pattern seen in human eyes, which makes it easy for them to detect the direction of someone's gaze from a distance. (2019-09-04)
Connected forest networks on oil palm plantations key to protecting endangered species
Set-aside patches of high-quality forest on palm oil plantations may help protect species like orangutans, as well as various species of insects, birds and bats -- many of which are threatened with extinction in areas of Indonesia and Malaysia, where 85% of the world's palm oil is produced. (2019-08-20)
Endangered Bornean orangutans survive in managed forest, decline near oil palm plantations
Recent surveys of the population of endangered Bornean orangutans in Sabah, the Malaysian state in the north-east of Borneo, show mixed results. (2019-07-17)
Snowflakes inform scientists how tooth enamel is formed
Physicists and mathematicians use the classical Stefan problem to explain the principles of crystal formation, such as snowflakes . (2019-05-29)
Human ancestors were 'grounded,' new analysis shows
African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. (2019-04-30)
Astro-ecology: Counting orangutans using star-spotting technology
A groundbreaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo. (2019-04-09)
Chimpanzees lose their behavioral and cultural diversity
Chimpanzees are well known for their extraordinary diversity of behaviors, with some behaviors also exhibiting cultural variation. (2019-03-07)
To tool or not to tool?
Flexible tool use is closely associated to higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions. (2019-02-14)
Human mutation rate has slowed recently
Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and Copenhagen Zoo have discovered that the human mutation rate is significantly slower than for our closest primate relatives. (2019-01-22)
Late Miocene ape maxilla (upper jaw) discovered in western India
An ape maxilla (upper jaw) from the Late Miocene found in the Kutch basin, in western India, significantly extends the southern range of ancient apes in the Indian Peninsula, according to a study published in Nov. (2018-11-14)
Re-inventing the hook
Cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists from the University of Vienna, the University of St Andrews and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna around Isabelle Laumer and Alice Auersperg studied hook tool making for the first time in a non-human primate species -- the orangutan. (2018-11-08)
Contrary to government report, orangutans continue to decline
A recent report by the Government of Indonesia claiming an increase in orangutan populations of more than 10 percent from 2015 to 2017 is at odds with many recently published and peer-reviewed scientific studies on the subject, according to a letter in Current Biology on Nov. (2018-11-05)
Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased
Leipzig/Brunei. Orangutan populations are still declining rapidly, despite claims by the Indonesian Government that things are looking better for the red apes. (2018-11-05)
Rethinking the orangutan
The evolution of the orangutan has been more heavily influenced by humans than was previously thought, new research reveals. (2018-06-27)
Computational method puts finer point on multispecies genomic comparisons
A new computational tool will potentially help geneticists to better understand what makes a human a human, or how to differentiate species in general, by providing more detailed comparative information about genome function. (2018-06-20)
Wildfires may cause long-term health problems for endangered orangutans
Orangutans, already critically endangered due to habitat loss from logging and farming, may face another threat in the form of smoke from natural and human-caused fires, a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study finds. (2018-05-15)
Alligators on the beach? Killer whales in rivers? Get used to it
Sightings of alligators and other large predators in places where conventional wisdom says they 'shouldn't be' have increased in recent years, in large part because local populations, once hunted to near-extinction, are rebounding. (2018-05-07)
Rutgers student on front lines of orangutan conservation, research
Didik Prasetyo's passion is learning more about the endangered apes and trying to conserve their habitats and populations, which face enormous pressure from deforestation from logging, palm oil and paper pulp production and hunting. (2018-03-15)
In 16 years, Borneo lost more than 100,000 orangutans
Over a 16-year period, about half of the orangutans living on the island of Borneo were lost as a result of changes in land cover. (2018-02-15)
Dramatic decline of Bornean orangutans
Nearly 50 years of conservation efforts have been unable to prevent orangutan numbers on Borneo from plummeting. (2018-02-15)
Use of primate 'actors' misleading millions of viewers
More needs to be done to educate audiences, including viewers at home and filmmakers, on the unethical nature of using primates in the film industry, says a leading expert in a new study. (2018-01-17)
Flying laboratory reveals crucial tropical forest conservation targets in Borneo
About 40 percent of northern Malaysian Borneo's carbon stocks exist in forests that are not designated for maximum protections, according to new research from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory team. (2017-12-04)
Newly discovered orangutan species is 'among the most threatened great apes in the world'
Scientists have long recognized six living species of great ape aside from humans: Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, eastern and western gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos. (2017-11-02)
UZH anthropologists describe third orangutan species
Previously only two species of orangutans were recognized -- the Bornean and the Sumatran orangutan. (2017-11-02)
Humans don't use as much brainpower as we like to think
When it comes to brainpower, humans aren't as exceptional as we like to think. (2017-10-31)
Tropical forest reserves slow down global warming
National parks and nature reserves in South America, Africa and Asia, created to protect wildlife, heritage sites and the territory of indigenous people, are reducing carbon emissions from tropical deforestation by a third, and so are slowing the rate of global warming, a new study shows. (2017-10-27)
Researchers identify protein that could reduce death, improve symptoms in flu and other infections
A new study by researchers has identified an innovative strategy for treating influenza, and perhaps other infectious diseases as well. (2017-09-29)
New 13-million-year-old infant skull sheds light on ape ancestry
The discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. (2017-08-09)
Bornean orangutans' canopy movements flag conservation targets
Bornean orangutans living in forests impacted by human commerce seek areas of denser canopy enclosure, taller trees, and sections with trees of uniform height, according to new research. (2017-07-18)
Wild orangutan teeth provide insight into human breast-feeding evolution
Biomarkers in the teeth of wild orangutans indicate nursing patterns related to food fluctuations in their habitats, which can help guide understanding of breast-feeding evolution in humans, according to a study published today in Science Advances. (2017-05-17)
Orangutans suckle for up to eight years, teeth reveal
Researchers have developed a method for tracking characteristically elusive nursing patterns in primates and used it to discover that some immature orangutans suckle for eight years or more -- exceeding the maximum weaning age reported for other non-human primates. (2017-05-17)
Study could provide first clues about the social lives of extinct human relatives
A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) of the bony head-crests of male gorillas could provide some of the first clues about the social structures of our extinct human relatives, including how they chose their sexual partners. (2017-05-03)
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