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Current Pathogen News and Events

Current Pathogen News and Events, Pathogen News Articles.
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Breakthrough in fight against plant diseases
A global research team including scientists from La Trobe University have identified specific locations within plants' chromosomes capable of transferring immunity to their offspring. (2019-03-20)
Copying made easy
Whether revealing a perpetrator with DNA evidence, diagnosing a pathogen, classifying a paleontological discovery, or determining paternity, the duplication of nucleic acids (amplification) is indispensable. (2019-03-12)
How well do vaccines work? Research reveals measles vaccine efficacy
'What we found was a bit of a shock -- there are a very small number of studies that test whether vaccines are effective across multiple pathogen doses ...' said Langwig. (2019-03-07)
Chelated calcium benefits poinsettias
Cutting quality has an impact on postharvest durability during shipping and propagation of poinsettias. (2019-02-27)
Plants can skip the middlemen to directly recognize disease-causing fungi
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have revealed that direct physical associations between plant immune proteins and fungal molecules are widespread during attempted infection. (2019-02-19)
UBC researchers develop diagnostic tool for detecting cryptosporidium
Using a small and inexpensive biosensor, researchers in the School of Engineering have developed a novel low-cost technique that quickly and accurately detects cryptosporidium contamination in water samples. (2019-02-14)
Genetic tricks of rabbits resistant to fatal viral disease
Underlying genetic variation in the immune systems of rabbits allowed them to rapidly evolve genetic resistance to the myxoma virus, a deadly rabbit pathogen introduced into Europe and Australia during the 1950s, according to a new study. (2019-02-14)
University of Konstanz gains new insights into development of the human immune system
Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens. (2019-02-13)
More scrutiny needed for less-deadly foodborne bacteria
Employing advanced genetic-tracing techniques and sharing the data produced in real time could limit the spread of bacteria -- Bacillus cereus -- which cause foodborne illness, according to researchers who implemented whole-genome sequencing of a pathogen-outbreak investigation. (2019-02-13)
New AI toolkit is the 'scientist that never sleeps'
Researchers have developed a new AI-driven platform that can analyze how pathogens infect our cells with the precision of a trained biologist. (2019-02-12)
Infection biology: What makes Helicobacter so adaptable?
The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori owes its worldwide distribution to its genetic adaptability. (2019-02-12)
Tuberculosis: Inhibiting host cell death with immunotherapy
DZIF scientists from the University Hospital Cologne are working on an immunotherapy that supports antibiotic treatment of tuberculosis. (2019-02-11)
New tuberculosis drug may shorten treatment time for patients
A new experimental antibiotic for tuberculosis has been shown to be more effective against TB than isoniazid, a decades-old drug which is currently one of the standard treatments. (2019-02-11)
How a fungus can cripple the immune system
An international research team led by Professor Oliver Werz of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, has now discovered how the fungus knocks out the immune defenses, enabling a potentially fatal fungal infection to develop. (2019-02-08)
Genome scientists develop novel approaches to studying widespread form of malaria
Scientists at the Institute of Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed a novel way with genome sequences to study and better understand transmission, treat and ultimately eradicate Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria. (2019-02-08)
Mosaic-like gene deletion and duplication pattern shaping the immune system discovered
A team of researchers from Bar-Ilan University has developed a computational tool for analyzing genetic changes related to the immune system. (2019-02-07)
The protective role of dengue immunity on Zika infection in a Brazilian favela
By monitoring the spread of Zika virus through a densely populated Brazilian favela during a 2015 outbreak, researchers have gained new perspectives into the outbreaks of this virus in the Americas in recent years. (2019-02-07)
Biotechnology to the rescue of Brussels sprouts
An international team has identified the genes that make these plants resistant to the pathogen that attacks crops belonging to the cabbage family all over the world. (2019-02-04)
Rapid gene cloning technique will transform crop disease protection
Researchers have pioneered a new method which allows them to rapidly recruit disease resistance genes from wild plants and transfer them into domestic crops. (2019-02-04)
When mucus can be key to treating colon and airway diseases
New research reveals how healthy cells in our bodies produce mucins -- the main component of mucous, which protects our intestine and airway from pathogens, toxins and allergens. (2019-02-01)
Computer program aids food safety experts with pathogen testing
Cornell University scientists have developed a computer program, Environmental Monitoring With an Agent-Based Model of Listeria (EnABLe), to simulate the most likely locations in a processing facility where the deadly food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes might be found. (2019-01-24)
Cortexyme announces publication of foundational data for groundbreaking approach to treating Alzheimer's disease in Science Advances
An international team of researchers led by Cortexyme co-founders Stephen Dominy, M.D. and Casey Lynch detail the role of a common bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), in driving Alzheimer's disease pathology and demonstrate the potential for small molecule inhibitors to block the pathogen. (2019-01-23)
Leaf age determines the division of labor in plant stress responses
A new study from researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research published in the journal PNAS shows that the crosstalk between plant responses to physical and biological stresses varies between young and old leaves to enable optimal plant performance when the two kinds of stress are encountered simultaneously. (2019-01-21)
UM professor co-authors report on the use of biotechnology in forests
University of Montana Professor Diana Six is one of 12 authors of a new report that addresses the potential for biotechnology to provide solutions for protecting forest trees from insect and pathogen outbreaks, which are increasing because of climate change and expanded global trade. (2019-01-15)
Viral production is not essential for deaths caused by food-borne pathogen
The replication of a bacterial virus is not necessary to cause lethal disease in mice infected with a food-borne pathogen called Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), according to a study published Jan. (2019-01-10)
Bacteria rely on classic business model
The pneumonia causing pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has developed a twin-track strategy to colonize its host. (2018-12-20)
The fauna in the Antarctica is threatened by pathogens humans spread in polar latitudes
The fauna in the Antarctica could be in danger due the pathogens humans spread in places and research stations in the southern ocean, according to a study led by the experts Jacob González-Solís, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona, and Marta Cerdà-Cuéllas, from the Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology (IRTA-CReSA). (2018-12-10)
Study: Tuberculosis survives by using host system against itself
In a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, scientists at the University of Notre Dame have discovered that the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) releases RNA into infected cells. (2018-12-05)
The virus detectives
Every summer in Southern Germany, Austria and Switzerland, tons of brown trout perish. (2018-11-28)
For ants, unity is strength -- and health
When a pathogen enters their colony, ants change their behavior to avoid the outbreak of disease. (2018-11-22)
Researchers uncover camouflage strategy of multi-resistant bacteria
Researchers at the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research have achieved a breakthrough in the decoding of multi-resistant pathogens. (2018-11-22)
Scientists shed new light on infection process of gastrointestinal pathogen C. difficile
Scientists from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research identified the mechanisms by which the bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile kills intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), thus destroying the protective mucosal barrier of the intestinal tract. (2018-11-21)
Researchers discover how 'cryptic' connections in disease transmission influence epidemics
A new study by researchers of disease transmission in bats has broad implications for understanding hidden connections that can spread diseases between species and lead to large-scale outbreaks. (2018-11-19)
Study reveals importance of 'cryptic connections' in disease transmission
A new study of disease transmission in bats has broad implications for understanding the hidden connections that can spread diseases between species and lead to large-scale outbreaks. (2018-11-19)
Microbiome implicated in sea star wasting disease
A first-of-its-kind study shows that the sea star microbiome is critically important to the progression of the wasting disease that is killing these animals from Mexico to Alaska -- and that an imbalance of microbes might be the culprit. (2018-11-07)
The Mincle receptor provides protective immunity against Group A Streptococcus
Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes invasive infections that result in high mortality. (2018-10-30)
Mycoplasma genitalium's cell adhesion mechanism revealed
Researchers from the Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC) and the Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine (IBB-UAB) have discovered the mechanism by which the bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (Mgen) adheres to human cells. (2018-10-29)
Golf course managers challenged by fungicide-resistant turf grass disease
Dollar spot -- the most common, troublesome and damaging turfgrass disease plaguing golf courses -- is becoming increasingly resistant to fungicides applied to manage it, according to Penn State researchers. (2018-10-24)
New agent against anthrax
A team led by Professor Arne Skerra at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed an innovative strategy for preventing the anthrax bacterium from absorbing iron, which is crucial for its survival. (2018-10-22)
Pathogens may evade immune response with metal-free enzyme required for DNA replication
New study shows that some bacterial pathogens, including those that cause strep throat and pneumonia, are able to create the components necessary to replicate their DNA using a ribonucleotide reductase enzyme that does not require a metal ion cofactor. (2018-10-18)
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