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Current Pathogens News and Events, Pathogens News Articles.
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How do land-use changes affect the spread of diseases between animals and people?
Most new viruses and other pathogens that arise in humans are transmitted from other animals, as in the case of the virus that causes COVID-19. (2020-06-03)
'Major gaps' in understanding how land-use changes affect spread of diseases
The quest to discover how new diseases -- such as Covid-19 -- emerge and spread in response to global land-use change driven by human population expansion still contains 'major gaps', researchers have claimed. (2020-06-03)
Bees grooming each other can boost colony immunity
Honeybees that specialise in grooming their nestmates (allogroomers) to ward off pests play a central role in the colony, finds a new UCL and University of Florence study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-06-02)
Researchers identify seasonal peaks for foodborne infections
Using a newly developed approach, researchers have identified seasonal peaks for foodborne infections that could be used to optimize the timing and location of food inspections. (2020-06-01)
When COVID-19 meets flu season
As if the COVID-19 pandemic isn't scary enough, the flu season is not far away. (2020-05-29)
CSIC researchers use whole living cells as 'templates' to seek for bioactive molecules
A study performed by researchers at the Institute for Advanced Chemistry of Catalonia (IQAC-CSIC) from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) pioneers the use of whole living cells (human lung adenocarcinoma) in dynamic combinatorial chemistry systems. (2020-05-27)
How does an increase in nitrogen application affect grasslands?
The 'PaNDiv' experiment, established by researchers of the University of Bern on a 3000 m2 field site, is the largest biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment in Switzerland and aims to better understand how increases in nitrogen affect grasslands. (2020-05-19)
New study by Clemson scientists could pave way to cure of global parasite
Clemson University scientists have taken another step forward in their quest to find a cure for a notorious parasite that has infected more than 40 million Americans and many times that number around the world. (2020-05-18)
Global spread of the multi-resistant pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia
An international consortium found a remarkable global spread of strains of a multi-resistant bacterium that can cause severe infections - Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. (2020-05-14)
Pollinator-friendly flowers planted along with crops aid bumblebees
A new study reported this week by evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University, with others, suggests that flower strips -- rows of pollinator-friendly flowers planted with crops -- offer benefits for common Eastern bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) colony reproduction, but some plants do increase pathogen infection risk. (2020-05-14)
New approach to design functional antibodies for precision vaccines
A new approach to de novo protein design dubbed 'TopoBuilder' allows researchers to develop complex antigens that, when used in vaccines, elicit antibody responses that target the weaknesses in some of the most intractable viral pathogens, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). (2020-05-14)
Cornell research traces how farmlands affect bee disease spread
A new Cornell University study on bees, plants and landscapes in upstate New York sheds light on how bee pathogens spread, offering possible clues for what farmers could do to improve bee health. (2020-05-14)
The microbiome controls immune system fitness
Working alongside colleagues in Mainz, Bern, Hannover and Bonn, researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and the German Rheumatism Research Center Berlin (DRFZ) were able to show how the microbiome helps to render the immune system capable of responding to pathogens. (2020-05-11)
Protective shield: How pathogens withstand acidic environments in the body
Certain bacteria, including the dangerous nosocomial pathogen MRSA, can protect themselves from acidic conditions in our body and thus ensure their survival. (2020-05-05)
Intensive farming increases risk of epidemics, warn scientists
Overuse of antibiotics, high animal numbers and low genetic diversity from intensive farming increase the risk of animal pathogens transferring to humans. (2020-05-04)
Research shows relationship between trophic type and latent period in fungal pathogens
Through a meta-analysis of biotrophs, hemibiotrophs, and necrotophs, four scientists set out to find if the latent period of leaf fungal pathogens reflects their trophic types. (2020-05-04)
Common ways to cook chicken at home may not ensure safety from pathogens
For home cooks, widespread techniques for judging doneness of chicken may not ensure that pathogens are reduced to safe levels. (2020-04-29)
A 'corset' for the enzyme structure
The structure of enzymes determines how they control vital processes such as digestion or immune response. (2020-04-24)
Inexpensive, portable detector identifies pathogens in minutes
Most viral test kits rely on labor- and time-intensive laboratory preparation and analysis techniques; for example, tests for the novel coronavirus can take days to detect the virus from nasal swabs. (2020-04-23)
Study reveals raw-type dog foods as a major source of multidrug-resistant bacteria that could potentially colonize humans
New research due to be presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) reveals that raw-type dog foods contain high levels of multidrug-resistant bacteria, including those resistant to last-line antibiotics. (2020-04-19)
Study suggests pets are not a major source of transmission of drug-resistant microbes to their owners
New research due to be presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) has identified genetically identical multidrug-resistant bacteria in humans and their pets, suggesting human-animal transfer is possible in this context. (2020-04-19)
Ash dieback is less severe in isolated ash trees
New research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Ecology finds that ash dieback is far less severe in the isolated conditions ash is often found in, such as forests with low ash density or in open canopies like hedges, suggesting the long term impact of the disease on Europe's ash trees will be more limited than previously thought. (2020-04-16)
Australia's Centre for Digestive Diseases cures Crohn's disease in new study
The Centre for Digestive Disease (CDD) headed by Professor Thomas Borody has cured Crohn's Disease as reported today by Dr Gaurav Agrawal in Gut Pathogens. (2020-04-15)
How cells recognize uninvited guests
Until now, the immune sensor TLR8 has remained in the shadows of science. (2020-04-14)
New information about the transmission of the amphibian pathogen, Bsal
Using existing data from controlled experiments and computer simulations, researchers with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture have found that host contact rates and habitat structure affect transmission rates of Bsal among eastern newts, a common salamander species found throughout eastern North America. (2020-04-08)
Blocking the iron transport could stop tuberculosis
The bacteria that cause tuberculosis need iron to survive. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now solved the first detailed structure of the transport protein responsible for the iron supply. (2020-04-01)
Wastewater test could provide early warning of COVID-19
Researchers at Cranfield University are working on a new test to detect SARS-CoV-2 in the wastewater of communities infected with the virus. (2020-03-30)
Forgotten tale of phage therapy history revealed
In the current situation when the fear of virus infections in the public is common, it is good to remember that some viruses can be extremely beneficial for mankind, even save lives. (2020-03-27)
Completely new antibiotic resistance gene has spread unnoticed to several pathogens
Aminoglycoside antibiotics are critically important for treating several types of infections with multi-resistant bacteria. (2020-03-26)
MIPT scientists explain why new dangerous viruses are so hard to identify
In response to the rapid spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, an authoritative global scientific journal, aptly named Viruses, published a fundamental review of problems related to identifying and studying emerging pathogens, such as the notorious coronavirus. (2020-03-25)
Sea otters, opossums and the surprising ways pathogens move from land to sea
A parasite known only to be hosted in North America by the Virginia opossum is infecting sea otters along the West Coast. (2020-03-19)
Blocking sugar structures on viruses and tumor cells
During a viral infection, viruses enter the body and multiply in its cells. (2020-03-17)
Research on the fossil
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg, Germany, succeeded for the first time ever in describing in lampreys the mechanistic basis with which the different receptor genes in these ancient creatures are assembled to form the receptor on the surface of immune cells. (2020-03-13)
Bacteria might help other bacteria to tolerate antibiotics better
A new paper by the Dynamical Systems Biology lab at UPF shows that the response by bacteria to antibiotics may depend on other species of bacteria they live with, in such a way that some bacteria may make others more tolerant to antibiotics. (2020-03-12)
Specialized helper cells contribute to immunological memory
Helper T cells play an important role in the immune response against pathogens. (2020-03-06)
New next-generation sequencing technique dramatically shortens diagnosis of sepsis
A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, describes a new technique that uses real-time next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze tiny amounts of microbial cell-free DNA in the plasma of patients with sepsis, offering the possibility of accurate diagnosis of sepsis-causing agents within a few hours of drawing blood. (2020-03-05)
Scientists create model to predict multipathogen epidemics
In one of the first studies of its kind, bioscientists from Rice University and the University of Michigan have shown how to use the interactions between pathogens in individual hosts to predict the severity of multipathogen epidemics. (2020-03-05)
Two-faced bacteria
The gut microbiome, which is a collection of numerous beneficial bacteria species, is key to our overall well-being and good health. (2020-03-05)
SFU team helps discover potential superbug-killing compound
Researchers in Simon Fraser University's Brinkman Laboratory are collaborating with US researchers to test a new drug that can kill a wide range of superbugs -- including some bacteria now resistant to all common antibiotics. (2020-03-03)
New Cas9 variant makes genome editing even more precise
Researchers develop more specific CRISPR-Cas9 gene scissors. (2020-03-03)
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