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Current Pathogens News and Events, Pathogens News Articles.
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Fecal transplantation can restore the gut microbiota of C-section babies
Birth by Cesarean section is detrimental to normal gut microbiota development. (2020-10-01)
Can organic plant protection products damage crops?
Protecting crops against pests and diseases is essential to ensure a secure food supply. (2020-09-30)
Virus turns deadly fungus from foe to friend in plants
Researchers have discovered that a fungal virus (also called a mycovirus) can convert deadly fungal pathogens into beneficial fungus in rapeseed plants. (2020-09-29)
After developing CRISPR test, UConn researchers validate clinical feasibility for COVID-19 testing
In March, researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering-- a shared department in the schools of Dental Medicine, Medicine, and Engineering--began to develop a new, low-cost, CRISPR-based diagnostic platform to detect infectious diseases, including HIV virus, the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). (2020-09-18)
Pandemics and epidemics could exacerbate racism xenophobia
Human beings share these same biological impulses as other animals to separate into modular social groups. (2020-09-16)
Innate immune system -- How cGAS is kept bottled up
In higher organisms, detection of DNA in the cytoplasm triggers an immune reaction. (2020-09-10)
A new method may make tomatoes safer to eat
When vegetable farmers harvest crops, they often rely on postharvest washing to reduce any foodborne pathogens, but a new University of Georgia study shows promise in reducing these pathogens - as well as lowering labor costs-- by applying sanitizers to produce while it is still in the fields. (2020-09-08)
Cell-autonomous immunity and the pathogen-mediated evolution of humans
Although immune responses are generated by a complex, hierarchical arrangement of immune system organs, tissues, and components, the unit of the cell has a particularly large effect on disease progression and host survival. (2020-09-04)
Subtypes and developmental pathways of innate T cells identified
Study finds T cells differentiate into memory cells before meeting antigens - a clue to developing new immunotherapy (2020-09-02)
Genomic analysis of STEC in a child reveals insights on a virulent, emerging fo
University at Buffalo researchers have completed the genomic analysis of an increasingly common strain of Shiga-toxin E. coli (STEC) that can cause severe disease outbreaks. (2020-09-02)
Plant pathogens reorder physical structures of effectors to escape plant recognition
Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete, or water mold, that causes the devastating potato disease known as late blight or potato blight and was responsible for the famous Irish Famine of the 1840s. (2020-09-02)
Decoded: The structure of the barrier between three cells
Organs in animals and in humans have one thing in common: they are bounded by so-called epithelial cells. (2020-08-27)
How plants shut the door on infection
A new study by an international team including University of Maryland scientists has discovered the key calcium channel responsible for closing plant pores as an immune response to pathogen exposure. (2020-08-26)
How plants close their gates when microbes attack
Like humans, plants protect themselves against pathogens. An international consortium under the lead of UZH professor Cyril Zipfel has now identified a long sought-after factor of this plant immune system: The calcium channel triggers the closure of stomata upon contact with microbes such as bacteria. (2020-08-26)
USDA says current poultry food safety guidelines do not stop salmonella outbreaks
Current poultry food safety guidelines for Salmonella, the leading cause of foodborne illness outbreaks, are inadequate. (2020-08-26)
Research illuminates new element of plant immune defense response to biotic stress
A collaboration between scientists with the Vidali at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the Centro de Biotecnología y Genómica de Plantas in Madrid resulted in the first article addressing the involvement of cytosolic calcium oscillations and waves in the immune response of P. patens to a biotic stress. (2020-08-26)
Why aren't sea trout thriving anymore?
Sea trout numbers are declining in Norway and scientists don't know why. (2020-08-17)
German-Argentinean doctoral program bears first fruits
The Faculty of Biology at TU Dresden and the Faculty of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences at the Universidad Nacional del Litoral (UNL) in Santa Fe, Argentina have had a very special partnership for more than five years. (2020-08-14)
'Critical' questions over disease risks from ocean plastics
Key knowledge gaps exist in our understanding of how ocean microplastics transport bacteria and viruses -- and whether this affects the health of humans and animals, researchers say. (2020-08-13)
MS drug may be used to inhibit hiv infection and reduce latent reservoir
A multiple sclerosis drug may be used to block HIV infection and reduce the latent reservoir, according to research published in PLOS Pathogens by a team at the RGeorge Washington University. (2020-08-13)
COVID-19 - The virus and the vasculature
In severe cases of COVID-19, the infection can lead to obstruction of the blood vessels in the lung, heart and kidneys. (2020-08-07)
A titanate nanowire mask that can eliminate pathogens
Researchers in Lásló Forró's lab at EPFL, Switzerland, are working on a membrane made of titanium oxide nanowires, similar in appearance to filter paper but with antibacterial and antiviral properties. (2020-08-07)
Are vultures spreaders of microbes that put human health at risk?
A new analysis published in IBIS examines whether bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present in wild vultures cause disease in the birds, and whether vultures play a role in spreading or preventing infectious diseases to humans and other animal species. (2020-08-05)
Land use changes may increase disease outbreak risks
Global changes in land use are disrupting the balance of wild animal communities in our environment, and species that carry diseases known to infect humans appear to be benefiting, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature. (2020-08-05)
Chlamydia: Greedy for glutamine
If chlamydiae want to multiply in a human cell, the first thing they need is a lot of glutamine. (2020-08-03)
Plastics, pathogens and baby formula: What's in your shellfish?
The first landmark study using next-generation technology to comprehensively examine contaminants in oysters in Myanmar reveals alarming findings: the widespread presence of human bacterial pathogens and human-derived microdebris materials, including plastics, kerosene, paint, talc and milk supplement powders. (2020-07-30)
Immune system variation can predict severe COVID-19 outcomes
The differing immune system responses of patients with COVID-19 can help predict who will experience moderate and severe consequences of disease, according to a new study by Yale researchers published July 27 in the journal Nature. (2020-07-27)
Preventing the next pandemic
A Policy Forum article published today in Science shows that an annual investment of $30 billion should be enough to offset the costs of preventing another global pandemic such as COVID-19. (2020-07-23)
Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria
A research team from the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation. (2020-07-22)
Novel 'on-off' switch discovered in plant defenses
Researchers investigating the ways that plants protect themselves--from insects to pathogens--have discovered an ''on-off'' switch that controls plant defensive mechanisms. (2020-07-22)
Research underscores importance of global surveillance of plant pathogens
First spotted in the United States in 2014, bacterial leaf streak of corn is an emerging disease of corn that has now spread to ten states, including the top three corn-producing states of Illinois, Iowa, and Nebraska. (2020-07-17)
K-State study first to show SARS-CoV-2 is not transmitted by mosquitoes
A new study by Kansas State University researchers is the first to confirm that SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, cannot be transmitted to people by mosquitoes. (2020-07-17)
Biomedical Sciences researchers discover first-in-class broad-inhibitor of paramyxovirus polymerases
A new antiviral drug that is effective against a broad range of human pathogens in the paramyxovirus family, such as the human parainfluenzaviruses and measles virus, has been discovered by researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2020-07-13)
International recommendations for nontuberculous mycobacteria
After 13 years, international Infectious Diseases and Respiratory Medicine societies have jointly issued new recommendations for the treatment of patients with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). (2020-07-13)
Cycad stem cuttings need wound sealants for successful propagation
The need to cover an open wound on cycad stem cuttings has been confirmed by the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam in a study published in the Tropical Conservation Science journal on April 27. (2020-07-09)
The restoration of forests with active rapid 'Ohi'a death infections may be possible
Positive news for 'ohi'a restoration in Hawai'i! A new USGS study indicates that 'ohi'a seedlings planted into sites with active Rapid 'Ohi'a Death (ROD) infections can survive for at least one year. (2020-07-09)
Bats offer clues to treating COVID-19
Bats carry many viruses, including COVID-19, without becoming ill. Biologists at the University of Rochester are studying the immune system of bats to find potential ways to ''mimic'' that system in humans. (2020-07-09)
Salmonella biofilm protein causes autoimmune responses -- Possible link with Alzheimer's
Scientists from the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and Temple University (Philadelphia, US) have demonstrated that a Salmonella biofilm protein can cause autoimmune responses and arthritis in animals. (2020-07-09)
Fighting E. coli with E. coli
According to findings published this week in mBio, Nissle, a strain of Escherichia coli, is harmless to intestinal tissue and may protect the gut from enterohemorrhagic E. coli, a pathogen that produces Shiga toxin. (2020-07-07)
Bad E. coli we know, but good E. coli?
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine say E. coli Nissle may protect human cells against other more pathogenic strains of E. coli such as E. coli 0157:H7, which is commonly associated with contaminated hamburger meat. (2020-07-07)
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