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Current Pathogens News and Events

Current Pathogens News and Events, Pathogens News Articles.
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New study on the immune system of plants: It works differently than expected
What happens at the molecular level when plants defend against invading pathogens? (2019-07-15)
Ancient defense strategy continues to protect plants from pathogens
Plant scientists at the University of Cambridge have discovered a suite of microbe-responsive gene families that date back to early land plant evolution. (2019-07-11)
How plague pathogens trick the immune system
Yersinia have spread fear and terror, especially in the past, but today they have still not been completely eradicated. (2019-07-11)
How to equip the brake of immunity
Japanese scientists at Toho University in Tokyo discovered a new mechanism to generate regulatory T cells (Treg cells), lymphocytes preventing autoimmunity and excess immune responses. (2019-07-09)
Environmentally friendly control of common disease infecting fish and amphibians
Aquatic organisms in marine systems and freshwaters are threatened by fungal and fungal-like diseases globally. (2019-07-01)
Gene activity database could spare thousands of mice
A comprehensive database of gene activity in mice across ten disease models, which could significantly reduce animal use worldwide, has been developed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, which gives a full picture of the immune response to different pathogens. (2019-06-28)
The state of multiple antibiotic resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Cape Coast, Ghana
The study was conducted to investigate the level of contamination of raw meat and Ghanaian coins in circulation at Cape Coast Metropolis. (2019-06-28)
How inhaled fungal spores cause fatal meningitis
Pathogenic fungal spores capitalize on host immune cells to escape the lung and gain access to the brain to cause fatal disease in mice, according to a study published June 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Christina Hull of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and colleagues. (2019-06-27)
A Trojan horse? Immune cells ferry deadly fungus from mouse lung into the blood
A report today (June 27) in PLOS Pathogens shows how inhaled fungal spores exit the lung and trigger a fatal infection in mice. (2019-06-27)
Seven-country study reveals viruses as new leading cause of global childhood pneumonia
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and other viruses now appear to be the main causes of severe childhood pneumonia in low- and middle-income countries, highlighting the need for vaccines against these pathogens, according to a study from a consortium of scientists from around the world, led by a team at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-06-27)
Crop pests more widespread than previously known
Insects and diseases that damage crops are probably present in many places thought to be free of them, new research shows. (2019-06-24)
Metabolomic profiling of antibody response to periodontal pathogens
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Jaakko Leskela, University of Helsinki, Finland, gave an oral presentation on 'Metabolomic Profiling of Antibody Response to Periodontal Pathogens.' (2019-06-22)
How bacteria kill host cells from the inside
A bacterial pathogen that typically multiplies outside of host cells can enter and induce the destruction of cells called macrophages, according to a study published June 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Anne-Béatrice Blanc-Potard of the Université de Montpellier in France, and colleagues. (2019-06-20)
How bacteria protect themselves from plasma treatment
Considering the ever-growing percentage of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics, interest in medical use of plasma is increasing. (2019-06-19)
Researchers learn dangerous brain parasite 'orders in' for dinner
Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have discovered how toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled parasite, maintains a steady supply of nutrients while replicating inside of its host cell: it calls for delivery. (2019-06-19)
UMBC research decodes plant defense system, with an eye on improving farming and medicine
The plant circadian clock determines when certain defense responses are activated (often timed with peak activity of pests), and compounds used in defense affect the clock. (2019-06-12)
Study reveals potential new disease threats for wild snow leopards
The first study to investigate disease threats to wild snow leopards has detected that exposure to infections may pose a threat to this highly vulnerable species, as well as local people and their livestock. (2019-06-06)
Antibiotic produced by the microbiome kills bacteria by disturbing energy metabolism
A research team from the universities of Tübingen and Göttingen as well as from the German Center for Infection Research has investigated the mode of action of a new class of antibiotics that is highly effective against multidrug-resistant pathogens. (2019-06-04)
Pathogens may have facilitated the evolution of warm-blooded animals
Animals first developed fever as a response to infections: the higher body temperatures primed their immune systems. (2019-06-04)
New records show spread of parasitic deer flies across the US
With flattened bodies, grabbing forelegs and deciduous wings, deer keds do not look like your typical fly. (2019-05-31)
New study reveals gut is organized by function, and opportunities for better drug design
New findings provide insights about how the intestine maximizes nutrient uptake, while at the same time protecting the body from potentially dangerous microbes. (2019-05-24)
Paper stickers to monitor pathogens are more effective than swabs
Using paper stickers to collect pathogens on surfaces where antisepsis is required, such as in food processing plants, is easier, and less expensive than swabbing, yet similarly sensitive. (2019-05-24)
Natural environments favor 'good' bacteria
A new study has shown that restoring environments to include a wider range of species can promote 'good' bacteria over 'bad' -- with potential benefits for human health. (2019-05-22)
New single vaccination approach to killer diseases
Scientists from the University of Adelaide's Research Centre for Infectious Diseases have developed a single vaccination approach to simultaneously combat influenza and pneumococcal infections, the world's most deadly respiratory diseases. (2019-05-20)
Symbionts as lifesavers
When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. (2019-05-14)
Dehesa health starts from the ground up
University of Cordoba research analyzes how changes in the structure of soil microbiota affect holm oak decline. (2019-05-07)
Key step in transformation of B cells to antibody-secreting cells described
Immunologist Frances Lund, Ph.D., and colleagues have detailed the role of a key controlling factor in the transformation of B cells into antibody-secreting cells, the cells that produce antibodies to fight invading pathogens like viruses. (2019-05-07)
Advanced detection tool to limit the spread of devastating tree pathogens
New easy-to-transport tool, suitable for non-scientists to promote the advanced detection and limits the spread of some of the most devastating tree pathogens in the European context. (2019-04-30)
Evolving alongside viruses impacts susceptibility to future infections
Researchers have shown that when fruit flies co-evolve with viruses, different genetic changes occur to those caused by encountering a virus for the first time, altering the insects' susceptibility to future infection. (2019-04-30)
Pest-killing fungi could protect NYS grapes, apples from invasive insect
Cornell University-led research reports that two local fungal pathogens could potentially curb an invasive insect that has New York vineyard owners on edge. (2019-04-30)
Changing climate may affect animal-to-human disease transfer
Climate change could affect occurrences of diseases like bird-flu and Ebola, with environmental factors playing a larger role than previously understood in animal-to-human disease transfer. (2019-04-30)
Darwin can help your doctor
Taking an evolutionary view can inspire new ideas in clinical microbiology. (2019-04-29)
New dispersion method to effectively kill biofilm bacteria could improve wound care
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a method to treat bacterial infections which could result in better wound care. (2019-04-23)
Field trial with neonicotinoids: Honeybees are much more robust than bumblebees
The insecticide clothianidin affects different species of bees in different ways. (2019-04-23)
More severe salmonella outbreaks ahead: University of Sydney research
University of Sydney researchers have developed a model that can predict salmonella outbreaks several months in advance, and its results come as a warning ahead of the Easter long weekend. (2019-04-17)
FIU scientists discover new arsenic-based broad-spectrum antibiotic
Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health threats of our time. (2019-04-16)
Petting zoos could potentially transmit highly virulent drug-resistant bacteria to visitors
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that petting zoos can create a diverse reservoir of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, which could lead to highly virulent drug-resistant pathogens being passed on to visitors. (2019-04-13)
Starvation study shows bacteria's survival skills
A larger genetic inventory may help explain how certain dangerous bacteria can persist in a hospital environment and continue to infect patients, according to a new study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2019-04-12)
Antibiotics legitimately available in over-counter throat medications could contribute to increased antibiotic resistance
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the inappropriate of use of antibiotics legitimately available in over-the-counter (OTC) throat medications could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, thereby going against World Health Organization (WHO) goals. (2019-04-11)
Oral bacteria 'battle royale' helps explain how a pathogen causes hospital infections
In a paper publishing later this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, researchers from the Forsyth Institute and colleagues describe their discovery that three closely related species of bacteria belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae outlived all other oral bacteria in long-term starvation or 'doomsday' experiment. (2019-04-08)
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