Current Pedestrians News and Events

Current Pedestrians News and Events, Pedestrians News Articles.
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Researchers develop framework to identify health impacts of self-driving vehicles
Autonomous vehicles (AV) are the wave of the future in the automobile industry, and there's extensive discussion about the impacts on transportation, society, the economy and the environment. However, less attention has been focused on the potential health impacts of self-driving vehicles. (2020-10-15)

New perception metric balances reaction time, accuracy
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new metric for evaluating how well self-driving cars respond to changing road conditions and traffic, making it possible for the first time to compare perception systems for both accuracy and reaction time. (2020-09-09)

High walk and bike scores associated with greater crash risk
Neighbourhoods with high bikeability and walkability scores actually present higher crash risks to cyclists and pedestrians in Vancouver, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. (2020-08-27)

New automotive radar spots hazards around corners
Using radar commonly deployed to track speeders and fastballs, researchers have developed an automated system that will allow cars to peer around corners and spot oncoming traffic and pedestrians. The system, easily integrated into today's vehicles, uses Doppler radar to bounce radio waves off surfaces such as buildings and parked automobiles. (2020-06-25)

CMU method makes more data available for training self-driving cars
For safety's sake, a self-driving car must accurately track the movement of pedestrians, bicycles and other vehicles around it. Training those tracking systems may now be more effective thanks to a new method developed at Carnegie Mellon University. Generally speaking, the more road and traffic data available for training tracking systems, the better the results, and the CMU researchers have found a way to unlock a mountain of data. (2020-06-17)

Virtual demolition
Scientists at Osaka University show how buildings and moving objects can be virtually removed from real-time images in a process of ''diminished reality.'' This work can be beneficial for urban and campus planners. (2020-06-17)

Self-driving cars that recognize free space can better detect objects
It's important that self-driving cars quickly detect other cars or pedestrians sharing the road. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have shown that they can significantly improve detection accuracy by helping the vehicle also recognize what it doesn't see. Empty space, that is. (2020-06-11)

Algorithmic autos
Connected and automated vehicles use technology such as sensors, cameras and advanced control algorithms to adjust their operation to changing conditions with little or no input from drivers. A research group at the University of Delaware optimized vehicle dynamics and powertrain operation using connectivity and automation, while developing and testing a control framework that reduced travel time and energy use in a connected and automated vehicle. (2020-05-19)

Street smarts required in heat mitigation
Arizona State University researcher Ariane Middel and her colleagues investigated how solar reflective coatings on select Los Angeles city streets affected radiant heat and, in turn, pedestrians' comfort on a typical summer day. The idea is, if you coat a street with a lighter color than traditional pavement black, it will actually lower the surrounding temperatures. But ASU Ariane Middel and her collaborators wanted to measure what effect reflective coating had on pedestrians. (2020-05-11)

Evaluation of pedestrian walking speed change patterns at crosswalks in palestine
One of the main pedestrian issues considered in facilities and traffic signal design is pedestrian walking speed. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the walking speed change patterns at crosswalks and the appropriate design walking speed for pedestrians, which can then be used to design pedestrian facilities and traffic signals. (2020-05-05)

Could shrinking a key component help make autonomous cars affordable?
A team led by Stanford electrical engineer Jelena Vuckovic is working on shrinking the mechanical and electronic components in a rooftop lidar down to a single silicon chip that she thinks could be mass produced for as little as a few hundred dollars. (2020-04-15)

Men pose more risk to other road users than women
Men pose more risk to other road users than women do and they are more likely to drive more dangerous vehicles, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in the journal Injury Prevention. (2020-04-06)

Ride-hailing linked to more crashes for motorists and pedestrians
Ride-hailing trips increase the number of crashes for motorists and pedestrians at pick-up and drop-off locations, reports a new study from researchers at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. The research is the first to use data for individual ride-hailing trips, rather than comparing cities where ride-hailing is available to those where it is not available. (2020-04-06)

Power struggles hinder urban adaptation policies to climate change
Transformative actions implemented by cities to address and mitigate the impacts of climate change may be hindered by political struggles for municipal power. This is clear from a study developed by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) and the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), published in the journal Cities. (2020-03-11)

Drivers of expensive cars less likely to yield for pedestrians: UNLV study
What does the car you drive say about your manners? New UNLV study finds that drivers of flashy cars are less likely to yield for pedestrians. (2020-02-26)

Cyber researchers at Ben-Gurion University fool autonomous vehicle systems with phantom images
In a new research paper, ;Phantom of the ADAS,' the researchers demonstrated that autopilots and advanced driving-assistance systems (ADASs) in semi-autonomous or fully autonomous cars register depthless projections of objects (phantoms) as real objects. They show how attackers can exploit this perceptual challenge to manipulate the vehicle and potentially harm the driver or passengers without any special expertise by using a commercial drone and inexpensive image projector. (2020-02-18)

Owners of high-status cars are on a collision course with traffic
Self-centred men who are argumentative, stubborn, disagreeable and unempathetic are much more likely to own a high-status car. (2020-01-29)

Does news coverage of crashes affect perceived blame?
Despite an ever-rising number of pedestrian and bicyclist deaths on US roads each year, there's no widespread public pressure to improve road safety -- a situation influenced by how news articles about auto-pedestrian/bicyclist crashes are written, said Tara Goddard, Texas A&M assistant professor of urban planning. (2020-01-28)

Cycling to work? You may live longer
People who cycle to work have a lower risk of dying, a New Zealand study has found. The study, by researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington, the University of Melbourne and the University of Auckland, has just been published in the International Journal of Epidemiology. (2020-01-28)

The great e-scooter hack
New research out of UTSA finds e-scooters have risks beyond the perils of potential collisions. Computer science experts at UTSA have published the first review of the security and privacy risks posed by e-scooters and their related software services and applications. (2020-01-27)

More federal funding needed to increase Americans' active transportation habits
'In general, women will only cycle if they think the entire ride will be safe,' said Buehler. 'If they perceive that there will be any danger at all along the way they will resist.' (2020-01-14)

Who's liable? The AV or the human driver?
Researchers at Columbia Engineering and Columbia Law School have developed a joint fault-based liability rule that can be used to regulate both self-driving car manufacturers and human drivers. They propose a game-theoretic model that describes the strategic interactions among the law maker, the self-driving car manufacturer, the self-driving car, and human drivers, and examine how, as the market penetration of AVs increases, the liability rule should evolve. (2020-01-14)

Data Science Institute researcher designs headphones that warn pedestrians of dangers
To counter a growing public safety concern, researchers at the Data Science Institute, Columbia, are designing an intelligent headphone system that warns pedestrians of imminent dangers. (2019-12-09)

This AI birdwatcher lets you 'see' through the eyes of a machine
It can take years of birdwatching experience to tell one species from the next. But using an artificial intelligence technique called deep learning, Duke University researchers have trained a computer to identify up to 200 species of birds from just a photo. This tool goes beyond giving the right answer to explain its thinking, in a way that even someone who doesn't know a penguin from a puffin can understand. (2019-10-31)

Ants: Jam-free traffic champions
Whether they occur on holiday routes or the daily commute, traffic jams affect cars as well as pedestrians. Scientists at the CNRS, Université Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier (France) and the University of Arizona (United States) have demonstrated that ant colonies, however, are spared these problems and circulate easily, even in the event of extremely dense traffic, thus ensuring consistent efficiency in their foraging. These findings appear in the 22 October 2019 edition of eLife. (2019-10-22)

System can minimize damage when self-driving vehicles crash
Engineers have developed decision-making and motion-planning technology to limit injuries and damage when self-driving vehicles are involved in unavoidable crashes. After recognizing that a collision of some kind is inevitable, the system works by analyzing all available options and choosing the course of action with the least serious outcome. (2019-10-10)

3 in 5 parents say their teen has been in a car with a distracted teen driver
More than 1/2 of parents say their child has probably been in an unsafe situation as a passenger with a teen driver. (2019-09-16)

Using Wi-Fi like sonar to measure speed and distance of indoor movement
Researchers have developed a technique for measuring speed and distance in indoor environments, which could be used to improve navigation technologies for robots, drones -- or pedestrians trying to find their way around an airport. The technique uses a novel combination of Wi-Fi signals and accelerometer technology to track devices in near-real time. (2019-08-27)

New retroreflective material could be used in nighttime color-changing road signs
A thin film that reflects light in intriguing ways could be used to make road signs that shine brightly and change color at night. The technology could help call attention to important traffic information when it's dark, with potential benefits for both drivers and pedestrians, researchers say. (2019-08-09)

Do yellow-lens night-driving glasses improve visibility, reduce headlight glare?
With the use of a driving simulator, three commercially available yellow-lens night-driving glasses were compared with clear lenses to examine their ability to detect pedestrians or reduce the negative effects of headlight glare. The study included 22 participants. (2019-08-01)

Slower walking speed may predict future mobility problems
Until now, there has been no ideal way for healthcare providers to measure walking ability, since it involves more than just walking speed. It also is about how you deal with your environment (such as uneven pavement) and demands on your attention (such as traffic, other pedestrians, and street crossings). In a new study, researchers assessed ways to measure complex walking tasks to learn more about early, subtle changes in walking. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2019-07-23)

When you spot 1 driving hazard, you may be missing another
When people notice one traffic hazard, they are less likely to see a simultaneous second hazard, according to new research from North Carolina State University. The finding has potential applications for both driver training and the development of automated, in-vehicle safety technologies. (2019-07-22)

Study finds nearly half of shared e-scooters being ridden illegally
A QUT observational study of electric scooter riding in central Brisbane has found nearly half of shared e-scooters were being ridden illegally. (2019-07-11)

Ridehailing services may be driving up traffic deaths
The arrival of ridehailing is associated with an increase of approximately 3 percent in the number of motor vehicle fatalities and fatal accidents, according to research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. (2019-07-08)

Does being seen really make cyclists safer on the road?
Researchers from UBC Okanagan have determined motorists tended to give cyclists wearing high-visibility vests more room on the road, compared to cyclists without high-visibility clothing. The vests, with arrows directing traffic away from pedestrians and cyclists, have shown to reduce the number of traffic accidents involving these groups. (2019-05-28)

Heart failure, stroke greater among occupants in motor vehicle accidents
New research has shown that in older adults (65 and older), being an occupant in an automobile during a motor vehicle accident may lead to heart failure or stroke, as compared to pedestrians who are involved in motor vehicle accidents. (2019-05-23)

Nearly 1 in 5 parents say their child never wears a helmet while riding a bike
Despite evidence that helmets are critical to preventing head injuries, not all children wear them while biking, skateboarding and riding scooters, a new national poll finds. (2019-05-20)

Collision-detecting suitcase, wayfinding app help blind people navigate airports
Carnegie Mellon University researchers say a smart suitcase that warns blind users of impending collisions and a wayfinding smartphone app can help people with visual disabilities navigate airport terminals safely and independently. (2019-05-07)

New way to 'see' objects accelerates the future of self-driving cars
Researchers have discovered a simple, cost-effective, and accurate new method for equipping self-driving cars with the tools needed to perceive 3D objects in their path. (2019-04-23)

New, more realistic simulator will improve self-driving vehicle safety before road testing
Scientists from the University of Maryland, Baidu Research and the University of Hong Kong have developed data-driven simulation technology that combines photos, videos, real-world trajectory, and behavioral data into a scalable, realistic autonomous driving simulator (2019-03-27)

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