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Current Perception News and Events, Perception News Articles.
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Study looks at encoding the odor of cigarette smoke
A recent publication in the Journal of Neuroscience by a group of researchers at the University of Kentucky looks at Encoding the Odor of Cigarette Smoke. (2020-09-30)
Screen time can change visual perception -- and that's not necessarily bad
The coronavirus pandemic has shifted many of our interactions online, with Zoom video calls replacing in-person classes, work meetings, conferences and other events. (2020-09-30)
Global survey suggests patients most with type 1 diabetes that have adapted to remote medical appointments would continue this post COVID-19 pandemic
A survey of more than 7,000 patients with type 1 diabetes from 89 countries, presented at this year's online Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows that three quarters of patients who have adapted to telemedicine appointments would consider continung the use of online or telephone appointments with their doctors (2020-09-22)
A computer predicts your thoughts, creating images based on them
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have developed a technique in which a computer models visual perception by monitoring human brain signals. (2020-09-21)
Neurobiology - To keep pain in check, count down
Diverse cognitive strategies affect our perception of pain. Studies by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich neuroscientist Enrico Schulz and colleagues have linked the phenomenon to the coordinated activity of neural circuits located in different brain areas. (2020-09-21)
As pandemic progressed, people's perceived risks went up
A recent study documents how personal risk assessment and protective behaviors are linked. (2020-09-16)
How the brain creates the experience of time
On some days, time flies by, while on others it seems to drag on. (2020-09-14)
Mold now associated with food quality
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have studied a range of perceptions among Danes about good, healthy and safe foodstuffs. (2020-09-10)
Binge-drinkers' brains have to work harder to feel empathy for others
New research shows that binge-drinkers' brains have to put more effort into trying to feel empathy for other people in pain. (2020-09-10)
Experiments reveal why human-like robots elicit uncanny feelings
Experiments reveal a dynamic process that leads to the uncanny valley, with implications for both the design of robots and for understanding how we perceive one another as humans. (2020-09-10)
New perception metric balances reaction time, accuracy
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new metric for evaluating how well self-driving cars respond to changing road conditions and traffic, making it possible for the first time to compare perception systems for both accuracy and reaction time. (2020-09-09)
Is consciousness continuous or discrete? Maybe it's both, argue researchers
Two major theories have fueled a now 1,500 year-long debate started by Saint Augustine: Is consciousness continuous, where we are conscious at each single point in time, or is it discrete, where we are conscious only at certain moments of time? (2020-09-03)
New model explains when the brain becomes aware of information
EPFL scientists propose that periods of unconscious processing--during which the brain integrates information--precede brief moments of consciousness (2020-09-03)
Weight gainers more likely to underestimate their true body size
People with obesity who gain weight have a tendency to perceive their own body size as smaller than it actually is compared to those who maintain a stable weight, according to new research following more than 2,000 people with obesity from the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study over 10 years. (2020-09-03)
Why are there differing preferences for suffixes and prefixes across languages?
While speakers of English and other Western languages prefer using suffixes more than prefixes, a new study reveals that this preference is not as universal as once thought. (2020-08-28)
Fear of missing out impacts people of all ages
The social anxiety that other people are having fun without you, also known as FoMO, is more associated with loneliness, low self-esteem and low self-compassion than with age, according to a recent study led by Washington State University psychology professor Chris Barry. (2020-08-26)
Citizens' adherence to COVID-19 social distancing measures depends on government response
CU Denver researcher and Business School associate professor Jiban Khuntia, PhD, found while social distancing is an effective preventative measure in the fight against COVID-19, there are significant variations being observed in how and why individuals follow the restrictions in South Korea, North American and Kuwait. (2020-08-24)
Genetics: Romantic relationship dynamics may be in our genes
Variations in a gene called CD38, which is involved in attachment behaviour in non-human animals, may be associated with human romantic relationship dynamics in daily life, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-08-18)
Linking sight and movement
Harvard researchers found that image-processing circuits in the primary visual cortex not only are more active when animals move freely, but that they receive signals from a movement-controlling region of the brain that is independent from the region that processes what the animal is looking at. (2020-08-14)
When you're smiling, the whole world really does smile with you
From Sinatra to Katy Perry, celebrities have long sung about the power of a smile -- how it picks you up, changes your outlook, and generally makes you feel better. (2020-08-13)
Perceived "whiteness" of Middle Eastern Americans correlates with discrimination
The perceived ''whiteness'' of Americans of Middle Eastern and North African descent is indirectly tied to discrimination against them, and may feed a ''negative cycle'' in which public awareness of discrimination leads to more discrimination, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-07-22)
Vision scientists discover why people literally don't see eye to eye
We humans may not always see eye to eye on politics, religion, sports and other matters of debate. (2020-07-14)
Perceiving the flavor of fat: A Monell Center twins study
Most people would agree that the pleasure of some foods stems in part from its fat content. (2020-07-13)
More than meets the eye
New findings reframe the traditional view of face blindness as a disorder arising strictly from deficits in visual perception of facial features. (2020-07-10)
Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
According to the latest UN report, the number of displaced persons and refugees has surged, again, by several millions. (2020-07-09)
Distorted passage of time during the COVID-19 lockdown
A survey conducted in the U.K. suggests that social and physical distancing measures put in place during the Covid-19 pandemic significantly impacted people's perception of how quickly time passed compared to their pre-lockdown perceptions. (2020-07-09)
Sensation seekers, risk-takers who experience more bitterness apt to drink IPAs
People who seek novel and powerful sensations and are more prone to taking risks -- and who perceive bitter tastes more intensely -- are more likely to prefer bitter, pale-ale-style beers and drink them more often, according to Penn State sensory researchers, who conducted a study that involved blind taste tests and personality assessments. (2020-07-09)
Feeling with the heart
A person's sensitivity to external stimuli depends not only on the state of their nervous system, but also on their cardiac cycle. (2020-07-09)
Artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark, research
Researchers at McMaster University who study how the brain processes sound have discovered the common practice of using artificial tones in perception experiments could mean scientists are overlooking important and interesting discoveries in the field of brain research. (2020-07-07)
Neuromarketing of taste
Marina Domracheva and Sofya Kulikova, researchers from HSE University's campus in Perm, have discovered a new approach to analyse the perceived similarity of food products, based on electroencephalography (EEG) signals. (2020-06-26)
The relationship between looking/listening and human emotions
Toyohashi University of Technology has indicated that the relationship between attentional states in response to pictures and sounds and the emotions elicited by them may be different in visual perception and auditory perception. (2020-06-19)
Optogenetic odors reveal the logic of olfactory perception
Using optogenetic control, researchers have created an electrical signature that is perceived as an odor in the brain's smell-processing center, the olfactory bulb, even though the odor does not exist. (2020-06-18)
A Neandertal from Chagyrskaya Cave
Until now, only the genomes of two Neandertals have been sequenced to high quality: one from Vindjia Cave in modern-day Croatia and one from Denisova Cave in Siberia's Altai Mountains. (2020-06-17)
Self-driving cars that recognize free space can better detect objects
It's important that self-driving cars quickly detect other cars or pedestrians sharing the road. (2020-06-11)
Using brain imaging to demonstrate weaker neural suppression for those with autism
A University of Minnesota Medical School researcher recently published an article in Nature Communications that shows the differences in visual motion perception in autism spectrum disorder are accompanied by weaker neural suppression in the visual cortex of the brain. (2020-05-29)
Loss of smell, taste changes associated with COVID-19: Canadian study
Loss of smell (anosmia) and changes in taste (dysgeusia) were strongly associated with SARS-CoV-2, according to a Canadian study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2020/05/27/cmaj.200869. (2020-05-27)
Produce-buying incentive program a win-win for Oregon consumers and farmers
A national program that offers financial incentives so that low-income consumers can purchase more fruits and vegetables has shown great success in Oregon, according to a recent Oregon State University study. (2020-05-26)
Economists: Lack of COVID-19 preparedness in line with previous findings
The threat of a catastrophic pandemic in 2014 -- the West African Ebola outbreak -- did little to change the perception of US citizens regarding the importance of preparing for future outbreaks, (2020-05-14)
Why visual perception is a decision process
A popular theory in neuroscience called predictive coding proposes that the brain produces all the time expectations that are compared with incoming information. (2020-05-12)
Acute stress may slow down the spread of fears
Psychologists from the University of Konstanz in Southern Germany find that we are less likely to amplify fears in social exchange if we are stressed. (2020-05-12)
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