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Current Perception News and Events

Current Perception News and Events, Perception News Articles.
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How well do you know the back of your hand, really?
Many of us are spending a lot of time looking at our hands lately and we think we know them pretty well. (2020-03-24)
Changing how we think about warm perception
Perceiving warmth requires input from a surprising source: cool receptors. (2020-03-24)
Mirror, mirror, on the wall
How accurately can you judge your own looks? Researchers looked at how we rate our own bodies when viewed from a first-person perspective compared to when viewed from an outside perspective. (2020-03-18)
How dangerous news spreads: What makes Twitter users retweet risk-related information
In Japan, a country prone to various natural and man-made calamities, users often turn to social media to spread information about risks and warnings. (2020-03-11)
Don't blame the messenger -- unless it's all stats and no story
In some cases of ineffective messaging, it might be appropriate, despite the aphorism to the contrary, to blame the messenger. (2020-03-06)
How the brain separates words from song
The perception of speech and music -- two of the most uniquely human uses of sound -- is enabled by specialized neural systems in different brain hemispheres adapted to respond differently to specific features in the acoustic structure of the song, a new study reports. (2020-02-27)
Hearing aids may delay cognitive decline, research finds
Wearing hearing aids may delay cognitive decline in older adults and improve brain function, according to promising new research. (2020-02-26)
State of mind: The end of personality as we know it
In a study published today researchers propose that changing states of mind are holistic in that they exert all-encompassing and coordinated effects simultaneously on our perception, attention, thought, affect, and behavior. (2020-02-13)
More stroke awareness, better eating habits may help reduce stroke risk for young adult African-Americans
Young African-Americans are experiencing higher rates of stroke because of health conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity, yet their perception of their stroke risk is low. (2020-02-12)
UTA study examines potential sources of groundwater contamination in private wells
A study led by environmental researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington suggests a disconnect between the perception of groundwater contamination and the extent to which that contamination is attributable to oil and natural gas extraction. (2020-02-06)
Self-perception of aging may affect the prognosis of older patients with cancer
Self-perception of aging -- or attitudes toward one's aging experience -- may affect older individuals' risk of dying early after being diagnosed with cancer, according to results from a study published in Cancer Medicine. (2020-02-05)
AI could deceive us as much as the human eye does in the search for extraterrestrials
An artificial neural network has identified a square structure within a triangular one in a crater on the dwarf planet Ceres, with several people agreeing on this perception. (2020-01-28)
Art speaks for itself and makes hearts beat faster
Information about an artwork has no effect on the aesthetic experience of museum visitors. (2020-01-20)
Food textures affect perceptions of healthiness
New research has demonstrated how food producers could change the surface texture of products to change people's perceptions and promote healthy eating. (2020-01-09)
Dartmouth study finds conscious visual perception occurs outside the visual system
A Dartmouth study finds that the conscious perception of visual location occurs in the frontal lobes of the brain, rather than in the visual system in the back of the brain. (2019-12-13)
Study reveals rapid increases in cannabis use among individuals with depression
Results of a new study suggest that over the past decade (2005-2017), the prevalence of cannabis use in the United States has increased among persons with and without depression, though the increase is significantly more rapid among those with depression. (2019-12-11)
Rhythmic perception in humans has strong evolutionary roots
So suggests a study that compares the behaviour of rodents and humans with respect to the detection rhythm, published in Journal of Comparative Psychology by Alexandre Celma-Miralles and Juan Manuel Toro, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition. (2019-12-09)
Study reveals increased cannabis use in individuals with depression
New findings published in Addiction reveal the prevalence of cannabis, or marijuana, use in the United States increased from 2005 to 2017 among persons with and without depression and was approximately twice as common among those with depression in 2017. (2019-12-09)
Neuro interface adds tactile dimension to screen images
Researchers from Duke University and HSE University have succeeded in creating artificial tactile perception in monkeys through direct brain stimulation. (2019-12-03)
Virtual reality becomes more real
Scientists from Skoltech ADASE (Advanced Data Analytics in Science and Engineering) lab have found a way to enhance depth map resolution, which should make virtual reality and computer graphics more realistic. (2019-11-28)
Approaching the perception of touch in the brain
More than ten percent of the cerebral cortex are involved in processing information about our sense of touch -- a larger area than previously thought. (2019-11-25)
How people trick themselves into thinking something is heavier than it really is
In a recent study published in PLOS One researchers from Hiroshima University and Nagoya Institute of Technology found that if you hold your car steering wheel at certain angles (1, 4, or 5 on the clock) then it's likely you're over or underestimating how much force you need to use to steer the car. (2019-11-20)
Walking changes vision
When people walk around, they process visual information differently than at rest: the peripheral visual field shows enhanced processing. (2019-11-20)
Good noise, bad noise: White noise improves hearing
Noise is not the same as noise -- and even a quiet environment does not have the same effect as white noise. (2019-11-12)
How sweet it isn't: Diminished taste function affects cancer patients' food intake
In a review of 11 studies 'that psychophysically measured taste and smell function and assessed some aspect of food behavior,' a University of Massachusetts Amherst sensory scientist found a reduced taste function, particularly for sweet flavors, among people with cancer. (2019-11-06)
Whether a fashion model or not, some body image concerns are universal
When researchers from UCLA and the Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa, Oklahoma, wanted to test an app they created to measure body image perception, they went to the body image experts -- fashion models. (2019-10-29)
For better research results, let mice be mice
Animal models can serve as gateways for understanding many human communication disorders, but a new study from the University at Buffalo suggests that the established practice of socially isolating mice for such purposes might actually make them poor research models for humans, and a simple shift to a more realistic social environment could greatly improve the utility of the future studies. (2019-10-24)
Sensing sweetness on a molecular level
Whether it's chocolate cake or pasta sauce, the sensation of sweetness plays a major role in the human diet and the perception of other flavors. (2019-10-23)
A blood factor involved in weight loss and aging
Aging can be delayed through lifestyle changes (physical exercise, restricting calorie intake, etc.). (2019-10-22)
Study reveals how age affects perception of white LED light
Although LEDs are increasingly used in low-energy lighting and displays, consumers sometimes find their light harsh or unpleasant. (2019-10-16)
Musical perception: nature or nurture?
This is the subject of the research by Juan Manuel Toro (ICREA) and Carlota Pagès Portabella, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition, published in the journal Psychophysiology as part of a H2020 project being carried out with Fundació Bial to understand the neuronal bases of musical cognition. (2019-10-10)
Parent and sibling attitudes among top influences on teenage e-cigarette use
Flavor, safety and family attitude toward vaping are among the greatest factors influencing teenage perception of e-cigarettes, new University at Buffalo research finds. (2019-09-30)
Perception of musical pitch varies across cultures
Unlike US residents, people in a remote area of the Bolivian rain forest usually do not perceive the similarities between two versions of the same note played at different registers, an octave apart. (2019-09-19)
Distractions distort what's real, study suggests
A new study suggests that distractions -- those pesky interruptions that pull us away from our goals -- might change our perception of what's real, making us believe we saw something different from what we actually saw. (2019-09-12)
Olfactory and auditory stimuli change the perception of our body
A pioneering investigation developed by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) alongside the University of Sussex and University College London, shows that olfactory stimuli combined with auditory stimuli can change our perception of our body. (2019-09-11)
How brain rhythms organize our visual perception
Imagine that you are watching a crowded hang-gliding competition, keeping track of a red and orange glider's skillful movements. (2019-09-09)
Motion perception of large objects gets worse during infant development
Humans can visually perceive the motion of a small object better than that of a large one. (2019-09-06)
As light as a lemon: How the right smell can help with a negative body image
The scent of a lemon could help people feel better about their body image, new findings from University of Sussex research has revealed. (2019-09-05)
Functional changes of thermosensory molecules related to environmental adaptation
Scientists from National Institute for Physiological Sciences and their collaborator in Japan have clarified the functional shift of thermal sensors among frog species adapted to different thermal niches and revealed the molecular basis for the shift in thermal perception related to environmental adaptation. (2019-09-02)
How to simulate softness
What factors affect how human touch perceives softness, like the feel of pressing your fingertip against a marshmallow, a piece of clay or a rubber ball? (2019-08-30)
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