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Current Perception News and Events

Current Perception News and Events, Perception News Articles.
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A blood factor involved in weight loss and aging
Aging can be delayed through lifestyle changes (physical exercise, restricting calorie intake, etc.). (2019-10-22)
Study reveals how age affects perception of white LED light
Although LEDs are increasingly used in low-energy lighting and displays, consumers sometimes find their light harsh or unpleasant. (2019-10-16)
Musical perception: nature or nurture?
This is the subject of the research by Juan Manuel Toro (ICREA) and Carlota Pag├Ęs Portabella, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition, published in the journal Psychophysiology as part of a H2020 project being carried out with Fundaci├│ Bial to understand the neuronal bases of musical cognition. (2019-10-10)
Parent and sibling attitudes among top influences on teenage e-cigarette use
Flavor, safety and family attitude toward vaping are among the greatest factors influencing teenage perception of e-cigarettes, new University at Buffalo research finds. (2019-09-30)
Perception of musical pitch varies across cultures
Unlike US residents, people in a remote area of the Bolivian rain forest usually do not perceive the similarities between two versions of the same note played at different registers, an octave apart. (2019-09-19)
Distractions distort what's real, study suggests
A new study suggests that distractions -- those pesky interruptions that pull us away from our goals -- might change our perception of what's real, making us believe we saw something different from what we actually saw. (2019-09-12)
Olfactory and auditory stimuli change the perception of our body
A pioneering investigation developed by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) alongside the University of Sussex and University College London, shows that olfactory stimuli combined with auditory stimuli can change our perception of our body. (2019-09-11)
How brain rhythms organize our visual perception
Imagine that you are watching a crowded hang-gliding competition, keeping track of a red and orange glider's skillful movements. (2019-09-09)
Motion perception of large objects gets worse during infant development
Humans can visually perceive the motion of a small object better than that of a large one. (2019-09-06)
As light as a lemon: How the right smell can help with a negative body image
The scent of a lemon could help people feel better about their body image, new findings from University of Sussex research has revealed. (2019-09-05)
Functional changes of thermosensory molecules related to environmental adaptation
Scientists from National Institute for Physiological Sciences and their collaborator in Japan have clarified the functional shift of thermal sensors among frog species adapted to different thermal niches and revealed the molecular basis for the shift in thermal perception related to environmental adaptation. (2019-09-02)
How to simulate softness
What factors affect how human touch perceives softness, like the feel of pressing your fingertip against a marshmallow, a piece of clay or a rubber ball? (2019-08-30)
How texture deceives the moving finger
The perceived speed of a surface moving across the skin depends on texture, with some textures fooling us into thinking that an object is moving faster than it is, according to a study published Aug. (2019-08-27)
Skeletal shapes key to rapid recognition of objects
In the blink of an eye, the human visual system can process an object, determining whether it's a cup or a sock within milliseconds, and with seemingly little effort. (2019-08-20)
Traumas change perception in the long term
People with maltreatment experiences in their childhood have a changed perception of social stimuli later as adults. (2019-08-19)
Shedding light on how the human eye perceives brightness
Japanese scientists are shedding new light on the importance of light-sensing cells in the retina that process visual information. (2019-08-17)
Gene regulation behind the choice of the correct receptor for olfaction
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have uncovered the genetics behind two distinct types of olfactory sensory neurons; the so called 'class I olfactory neurons' that has persisted from aquatic to terrestrial animals and the 'class II olfactory neurons' that only terrestrial animals possess. (2019-08-16)
It's not you, it's the network
The result of the 2016 US presidential election was, for many, a surprise lesson in social perception bias -- peoples' tendency to assume that others think as we do, and to underestimate the size and influence of a minority party. (2019-08-12)
BrainHealth researchers study the neurochemistry of social perception
Cues signaling trust and dominance are crucial for social life. (2019-08-08)
Pupillary response to glare illusions of different colors
Toyohashi University of Technology researchers in cooperation with researchers at the University of Oslo measured people's perceived brightness and pupillary response after viewing glare illusions presented in a variety of different colors. (2019-08-08)
When plant roots learned to follow gravity
Highly developed seed plants evolved deep root systems that are able to sense Earth's gravity. (2019-08-02)
Scientists identified a new signaling component important for plant symbiosis
A proteomics-based protein-protein interaction study has led to the discovery of proteins that interact with a legume receptor that mediates signal transduction from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. (2019-08-01)
Individuals with obesity get more satisfaction from their food
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics found no significant difference in taste perceptions between participants of normal weight and those who were overweight. (2019-07-30)
Visible punishment institutions are key in promoting large-scale cooperation: Study
New international research by Monash University has found that one way to overcome social dilemmas is through visible prosocial punishment -- the existence of collective institutions that punish individuals who don't cooperate. (2019-07-26)
Opioid prescribing rates higher in US compared with other countries
Physicians in the United States may prescribe opioids more frequently to patients during hospitalization and at discharge when compared to their physician peers in other countries, according to a recently published study led by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine. (2019-07-24)
What do the red 'ornaments' of female macaques mean?
Scientists demonstrated that, contrary to what had been assumed for several years, colour variations among female macaques do not precisely indicate the time of ovulation. (2019-07-19)
CCNY physicists use mathematics to trace neuro transitions
Unique in its application of a mathematical model to understand how the brain transitions from consciousness to unconscious behavior, a study at The City College of New York's Benjamin Levich Institute for Physico-Chemical Hydrodynamics may have just advanced neuroscience appreciably. (2019-07-18)
Stimulating life-like perceptual experiences in brains of mice
Using a new and improved optogenetic technique, researchers report the ability to control -- and even create -- novel visual experiences in the brains of living mice, even in the absence of natural sensory input, according to a new study. (2019-07-18)
Scientists discover a novel perception mechanism regulating important plant processes
Writing in 'Nature', scientists from Cologne (Germany) and Zurich (Switzerland) report on a discovery will lead to a better understanding of multiple processes in cells. (2019-07-11)
Facial plastic surgery in men enhances perception of attractiveness, trustworthiness
In the first of a kind study, plastic surgeons at Georgetown University found that when a man chose to have facial plastic surgery, it significantly increased perceptions of attractiveness, likeability, social skills, or trustworthiness. (2019-07-11)
Tour de France pelotons governed by sight, not aerodynamics
In a recent study, researchers reveal that vision is the main factor in the formation and shape of a peloton. (2019-07-09)
'You all look alike to me' is hard-wired in us, UCR research finds
We are hard-wired to process -- or not process -- facial differences based on race. (2019-07-08)
Going the distance: Brain cells for 3D vision discovered
Scientists at Newcastle University have discovered neurons in insect brains that compute 3D distance and direction. (2019-06-28)
Music develops the spoken language of the hearing-impaired
Finnish researchers have compiled guidelines for international use for utilising music to support the development of spoken language. (2019-06-27)
Do you feel the other closer to you when she/he contingently responds to your action?
Researchers from University of Toyama and Toyohashi University of Technology have found that social contingency modulates one's perceptual representation of the environment. (2019-06-27)
Brain structure determines individual differences regarding music sensitivity
The white matter structure in the brain reflects music sensitivity, according to a study by the research group on Cognition and Brain Plasticity of the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UB) and the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (UB-IDIBELL). (2019-06-27)
Brain anatomy links cognitive and perceptual symptoms in autism
Neuroscientists at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) and University College London have found an anatomical link between cognitive and perceptual symptoms in autism. (2019-06-18)
Bright lights outdoors may help treat lazy eye in children
Amblyopia, also known as lazy eye, is a loss of vision that affects two to five percent of children across the world and originates from a deficit in visual cortical circuitry. (2019-06-17)
UQ researcher carving a new path for skier safety
A spectacular stack on a ski slope in Canada has led to a University of Queensland researcher determining a simple modification that could improve skier safety on the snow. (2019-06-17)
Phantom sensations: When the sense of touch deceives
Without being aware of it, people sometimes wrongly perceive tactile sensations. (2019-06-14)
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