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Current Perspective News and Events, Perspective News Articles.
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Mirror, mirror, on the wall
How accurately can you judge your own looks? Researchers looked at how we rate our own bodies when viewed from a first-person perspective compared to when viewed from an outside perspective. (2020-03-18)
The brain has two systems for thinking about others' thoughts
The brain seems to have two different systems through which we can put ourselves into the shoes of someone else. (2020-03-06)
Severe peanut allergy may be a 'gut reaction'
A new study of 19 people who suffer from peanut allergy found an abundance of allergy-causing immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies in the gut, providing valuable insights into the mechanisms of severe allergies to peanuts and other foods, which together affect as much as 6% of the US population. (2020-03-05)
Setting up fundamental bases for information metasurface
In recent years, investigations of metasurfaces have been extended from the physical and material sciences to digital and information category. (2020-02-06)
Half of women with heart failure get the wrong treatment
As many as 50 per cent of women suffering from cardiac arrest are given insufficient treatment, because the heart failure was not caused by a heart attack. (2020-01-06)
Grower citizen science project uses collaboration to improve soil health
The Grower Citizen Science Project is a collaboration between soil scientists and growers in the southern High Plains of Texas. (2020-01-06)
OSIRIS-REx cameras capture particle ejection from asteroid Bennu
Cameras aboard NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft captured close-up shots of material being ejected from the surface of the near-Earth asteroid Bennu. (2019-12-05)
Smart reactions through online design of catalytic pockets
Mapping the three-dimensional structure of catalytic centers helps to design new and improved catalysts. (2019-11-26)
Structure of a mitochondrial ATP synthase
SciLifeLab researchers Alexander Mühleip and Alexey Amunts from Stockholm University solved the structure of a mitochondrial ATP synthase with native lipids. (2019-11-18)
Seeing is believing: Eye-tracking technology could help make driving safer
'Keep your eyes on the road.' With the recent advances in vehicle-assisted safety technology and in-car displays, this old adage has a new meaning, thanks to two new applications of eye-tracking technology developed by researchers at the University of Missouri. (2019-09-24)
Commit a crime? Loved ones got your back
Reading about a child abuse case or someone burglarizing homes often stirs feelings of disgust, anger and disbelief when it's learned the perpetrator's family or friends did nothing to stop it or report it to police. (2019-09-24)
Electric tech could help reverse baldness
Reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology developed by engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. (2019-09-19)
Heterogeneity in the workplace: 'Diversity is very important to us -- but not in my team'
Diversity in the workplace is highly sought in theory, but often still lacking in practice. (2019-09-12)
Seeing it both ways: Visual perspective in memory
Think of a memory from your childhood. Are you seeing the memory through your own eyes, or can you see yourself, while viewing that child as if you were an observer? (2019-08-27)
New retroreflective material could be used in nighttime color-changing road signs
A thin film that reflects light in intriguing ways could be used to make road signs that shine brightly and change color at night. (2019-08-09)
Fishing for insights into evolutionary change in the genome of frozen fish
Using decades-old frozen fish, researchers have discovered roots of rapid evolutionary adaptation to human activity in the Anthropocene. (2019-08-01)
Researchers suggest new approach needed to address Anthropocene risk
A team of international researchers suggest adopting a holistic approach to understanding environmental risks. (2019-07-22)
Using visual imagery to find your true passions
You may think you know what you like -- how to spend your time or what profession to pursue. (2019-07-22)
Rutgers collaborates with WHO to more accurately describe mental health disorders
A Rutgers University researcher collaborated with the World Health Organization on the first study to seek input from people with common mental health issues on how their disorders are described in diagnostic guidelines. (2019-07-16)
The brain's pathways to imagination may hold the key to altruistic behavior
Boston College researchers used neuroimaging to identify multiple neural pathways in the brain that explain the relationship between imagination and the willingness to help others. (2019-07-12)
How to improve care for patients with disabilities? We need more providers like them
When it comes to patients with disabilities, the chance of getting a clinician 'like them' is extremely low, which may lead to patients' reluctance to seek care or follow prescribed interventions and treatments. (2019-06-10)
The Neolithic precedents of gender inequality
Inequality between men and women was not generally consolidated in Iberia during the Neolithic. (2019-06-10)
Researchers from IKBFU study properties of amorphous microwires
Glass coated amorphous microwires are the newest perspective magnetic composite alloys that can be used for the creation of modern high-speed mass storage devices with high recording density and logic elements. (2019-05-22)
The enduring effects of mother-child interactions as children become adults
Interactions between a mother and her child have been linked to cognitive outcomes in childhood, but little work has looked at farther-reaching effects. (2019-05-09)
Close relatives can coexist: two flower species show us how
Scientists have discovered how two closely-related species of Asiatic dayflower can coexist in the wild despite their competitive relationship. (2019-05-07)
Research finds pregnant women feel pushed out of their jobs
Florida State University researcher Samantha Paustian-Underdahl found pregnant women experienced decreased encouragement in the workplace to return to their jobs after pregnancy. (2019-04-18)
Empathy and cooperation go hand in hand
Despite sometimes selfish instincts, cooperation abounds in human societies. Using mathematical models to explore this complex feature of social behavior, a University of Pennsylvania-led team shows that the act of taking another person's perspective -- a form of empathy -- supports the persistence of cooperation and altruism. (2019-04-09)
Visualization strategies may backfire on consumers pursuing health goals
Using visualization as motivation is a common technique for achieving goals, but consumers who are pursuing health goals such as eating healthy or losing weight should use caution when using perspective-based visualizations. (2019-04-04)
Johns Hopkins faculty staff members address travails of navigating metastatic cancer survivorship
Due to advances in treatment, an ever-increasing number of patients are living longer as metastatic cancer survivors. (2019-04-03)
Proofs of parallel evolution between cognition, tool development, and social complexity
A study led by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has used eye-tracking techniques to analyse the processes of selective attention that determine the way in which we explore and interact with our environment. (2019-03-08)
Longitudinal studies provide an excellent research learning environment for trainees
Compared to experimental studies that require complex infrastructures such as laboratories or clinical trials at multiple centers, studies using a longitudinal cohort (an observational research method in which data is gathered for the same participants repeatedly over a period of time) could be a good alternative for investigators as they begin their early research careers. (2019-03-07)
New wireless system 'cuts the cord' from newborn patient monitoring approaches
A new, less invasive system for monitoring the vital signs of some of the world's most fragile patients -- infants born pre-term or with debilitating disease -- would allow parents skin-to-skin contact with these children when they otherwise couldn't have it. (2019-02-28)
Research shows for the first time how we use others' viewpoints to make decisions
Everyday life is full of situations that require us to take others' perspectives. (2019-02-21)
Grasses can acquire genes from neighboring plants
Published in the Feb. 18, 2019, edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a study led by an international team including Guillaume Besnard, CNRS researcher at the 'Evolution et diversité biologique' laboratory (CNRS/IRD/Université Toulouse III -- Paul Sabatier), reveals that the genome of Alloteropsis semialata, a grass found in Australia, contains nearly 60 genes acquired from at least nine donor grasses species. (2019-02-18)
Broad regional accents are a barrier to social mobility, research finds
New research via Bath's Department of Education looked at the perception of regional accents for teachers across the UK. (2019-02-13)
Anther rubbing, a new movement discovered in plants, promotes prior selfing
Most plants have developed mechanisms to prevent self-fertilization and its detrimental effects of inbreeding depression. (2019-02-08)
Putting yourself in their shoes may make you less open to their beliefs
Trying to take someone else's perspective may make you less open to their opposing views, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2019-02-04)
Nudging does not necessarily improve decisions
Nudging, the concept of influencing people's behavior without imposing rules, bans or coercion, is an idea that government officials and marketing specialists alike are keen to harness, and itis often viewed as a one-size-fits-all solution. (2019-01-16)
Analysis estimates mortality from fungal infections of ash trees
The ash dieback epidemic, caused by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, has swept across Europe over the past 20 years and caused widespread damage and death in ash tree (Fraxinus excelsior) populations. (2018-12-05)
Obesity and food restrictions proven to be associated with less food enjoyment
A study carried out by UGR scientists shows that obesity and food restrictions -even trivial ones- such as temporary diets are associated with a reduction in enjoyment For this research, food-related emotions were analyzed in 552 adolescents aged 11 to 17 belonging to several high schools from Granada. (2018-11-13)
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