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Current Pesticides News and Events

Current Pesticides News and Events, Pesticides News Articles.
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Herbicide harming marsupial health and development, research finds
Researchers exposed the adult female tammar wallabies to atrazine contaminated water throughout pregnancy, birth and lactation to help establish the extent of harm being caused by the chemical. (2020-08-05)
Dozens of pesticides linked with mammary gland tumors in animal studies
In an analysis of how regulators review pesticides for their potential to cause cancer, researchers at Silent Spring Institute identified more than two dozen registered pesticides that were linked with mammary gland tumors in animal studies. (2020-08-04)
Pesticides can protect crops from hydrophobic pollutants
Researchers have revealed that commercial pesticides can be applied to crops in the Cucurbitaceae family to decrease their accumulation of hydrophobic pollutants, thereby improving crop safety. (2020-07-27)
What silicone wristbands say about chemical exposure in Uruguayan children
Researchers used silicone wristbands to examine the extent of chemical exposure among a small group of children in Montevideo, Uruguay. (2020-07-20)
Honeybees reveal environmental pollution in their surroundings
The University of Cordoba is collaborating on a new project by the University of Almeria to test APIStrip, a new tool for sampling environmental pollutants by means of bee colonies (2020-07-17)
Pesticides speed the spread of deadly waterborne pathogens
Widespread use of pesticides can speed the transmission of the debilitating disease schistosomiasis, while also upsetting the ecological balances in aquatic environments that prevent infections, finds a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. (2020-07-17)
Pesticide mixtures a bigger problem than previously thought
New research led by The University of Queensland has provided the first comprehensive analysis of pesticide mixtures in creeks and rivers discharging to the Great Barrier Reef. (2020-07-14)
Airborne chemicals could become less hazardous, thanks to a missing math formula
Purdue researchers have figured out a way to calculate surface viscosity just by looking at a stretched droplet as it starts to break. (2020-06-25)
Air pollution, smoking and built environment are associated with an increase risk of childhood obesity
173 exposures analysed in first major study to assess risk of obesity in childhood using an exposome-wide approach. (2020-06-24)
Study calls for reallocation of subsidies for biocontrols to fight fall armyworm
A new CABI-led study is calling for governments to reallocate subsidies to encourage the use of lower risk control options - such as biopesticides - in the fight against the devastating maize pest fall armyworm. (2020-06-17)
Honeybee lives shortened after exposure to two widely used pesticides
The lives of honeybees are shortened -- with evidence of physiological stress -- when they are exposed to the suggested application rates of two commercially available and widely used pesticides. (2020-06-16)
Anaerobically disinfect soil to increase phosphorus using diluted ethanol
Anaerobic disinfection of soil is an effective method to kill unwanted bacteria, parasites and weeds without using chemical pesticides. (2020-06-15)
An essential sustainable farming practice faces one big limitation: Land to produce seeds
The growth in cover cropping in the United States may soon hit a ceiling: planting millions of acres of cover crops requires huge extensions of land to produce cover crop seed. (2020-06-11)
Milkweed, only food source for monarch caterpillars, ubiquitously contaminated
New evidence identifies 64 pesticide residues in milkweed, the main food for monarch butterflies in the west. (2020-06-08)
Monitoring environmental exposures in dogs could be early warning system for human health
Man's best friend may also be man's best bet for figuring out how environmental chemicals could impact our health. (2020-06-01)
Parasitic wasp discovery offers chemical-free pest control for growers
A species of parasitic wasp discovered by chance could provide growers with a chemical-free way of controlling a major pest. (2020-05-22)
Lidar technology demonstrates how light levels determine mosquito 'rush hour'
The first study to remotely track wild mosquito populations using laser radar (lidar) technology found that mosquitoes in a southeastern Tanzanian village are most active during morning and evening 'rush hour' periods, suggesting these may be the most effective times to target the insects with sprays designed to prevent the spread of malaria. (2020-05-13)
Celiac disease linked to common chemical pollutants
Elevated blood levels of toxic chemicals found in pesticides, nonstick cookware, and fire retardants have been tied to an increased risk for celiac disease in young people, new research shows. (2020-05-12)
DDT, other banned pesticides found in Detroit-area black women: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study published in the journal Environmental Research finds detectable levels of DDE (what DDT becomes when metabolized in the body) and other banned organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the blood of over 60 percent of a cohort of black women of reproductive age in the Detroit area, with higher levels in women who smoked cigarettes daily, drank more alcohol, and drank more water. (2020-05-06)
'We urgently need a renewed public debate about new breeding technologies'
Plant breeding has considerably increased agricultural yields in recent decades and made a major contribution to combating global hunger and poverty. (2020-04-27)
Engineers develop precision injection system for plants
A new method developed by engineers at MIT may offer a starting point for delivering life-saving treatments to plants ravaged by such diseases. (2020-04-27)
How much does it cost california cannabis growers to safety test?
The high cost of testing cannabis in California leads to higher prices for the consumer, which could drive consumers to unlicensed markets. (2020-04-23)
How atrazine regulations have influenced the environment
Opposing chemical trends linked to atrazine regulations from 1990s. (2020-04-22)
Scientists' warning to humanity on insect extinctions
As the human race continues to battle the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists have found that the planet's insects are also facing a crisis after accelerating rates of extinction have led to a worldwide fall in insect numbers. (2020-04-06)
What motivates sales of pollinator-friendly plants?
Pollinator issues have emerged as critical within public awareness. As a result, many consumers and activists have advocated for the removal of commonly used pesticides. (2020-03-24)
Pesticide seed coatings are widespread but underreported
Seed-coated pesticides -- such as neonicotinoids, many of which are highly toxic to both pest and beneficial insects -- are increasingly used in the major field crops, but are underreported, in part, because farmers often do not know what pesticides are on their seeds, according to an international team of researchers. (2020-03-17)
Pesticides increase the risk of schistosomiasis, a tropical disease
Schistosomiasis is a severe infectious disease caused by parasitic worms. (2020-03-05)
How pest management strategies affect the bottom line
Concern regarding impacts of pesticides on the environment and human health has led to the development of integrated pest management (IPM) programs. (2020-02-28)
Sugar-poor diets wreak havoc on bumblebee queens' health
UC Riverside study shows that without adequate sugar, a bumblebee queen's fat body, which functions like a human liver, does not correctly produce enzymes required for healthy metabolism and detoxification from pesticides. (2020-02-27)
USask computer-based simulator tests insects for effects of new pesticide
University of Saskatchewan (USask) researchers have used a novel combination of techniques to compare the effects of two families of pesticides used in agriculture, and found that at low dosages the newer pesticide is less toxic than a currently used neonicotinoid one. (2020-02-24)
Farmers to tackle locust swarms armed with new app
A new smartphone app to tackle pests destroying crops has been developed -- and it could soon help farmers whose lands are being decimated by swarms of locusts, something the UN has called for 'rapid action' action on. (2020-02-13)
EPA fails to follow landmark law to protect children from pesticides in food
The landmark Food Quality Protection Act requires the Environmental Protection Agency to protect children's health by applying an extra margin of safety to legal limits for pesticides in food. (2020-02-12)
Burrowing mayfly's decline may serve as a warning system for the health of our environment
But scientists from Virginia Tech and the University of Notre Dame recently discovered that a particular species -- the burrowing mayfly -- had a population decrease of nearly 84 percent from 2015 to 2019. (2020-02-07)
Mosquitoes seek heat using repurposed ancestral cooling receptor
In a mosquito responsible for transmission of malaria, heat-seeking behavior -- critical to this insect's ability to locate and feed on warm-blooded hosts -- relies on a thermoreceptor that was once focused on heat avoidance (to help the mosquito keep cool). (2020-02-06)
Wasps' gut microbes help them -- and their offspring -- survive pesticides
Exposure to the widely used pesticide atrazine leads to heritable changes in the gut microbiome of wasps, finds a study publishing Feb. (2020-02-04)
Emerging organic contaminant levels greatly influenced by stream flows, seasons
Flow rates and time of year must be taken into account to better understand the potential risks posed by emerging organic contaminants in rivers and streams, according to Penn State researchers who studied contaminant concentrations and flow characteristics at six locations near drinking water intakes in the Susquehanna River basin. (2020-01-29)
A proposal to change environmental risk assessment for pesticides
Despite regulatory frameworks designed to prevent environmental damage, pesticide use is still linked to declines in insects, birds and aquatic species, an outcome that raises questions about the efficacy of current regulatory procedures. (2020-01-23)
Flame retardants and pesticides overtake heavy metals as biggest contributors to IQ loss
Adverse outcomes from childhood exposures to lead and mercury are on the decline in the United States, likely due to decades of restrictions on the use of heavy metals, a new study finds. (2020-01-14)
Time for a closer look at Pyrethroid insecticides
Columbia professors offer their perspective on a recent study on Pyrethroid, among the most widely used insecticides for public health control of vector-borne illnesses, including West Nile virus. (2020-01-03)
SFU researchers discover eyes a potential window for managing insects without chemicals
The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40% of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published in early 2019. (2019-11-28)
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