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Current Phosphorus News and Events

Current Phosphorus News and Events, Phosphorus News Articles.
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Terrestrial bacteria can grow on nutrients from space
As inevitable fellow travellers on the bodies of astronauts, spaceships, or equipment, terrestrial microorganisms will undoubtedly come into contact with extraterrestrial environments. (2020-05-26)
Marine waste management: Recycling efficiency by marine microbes
It was only relatively recently that tiny, single-celled thaumarchaea were discovered to exist and thrive in the pelagic ocean, where their population size of roughly 1028 (10 billion quintillion) cells makes them one of the most abundant organisms on our planet. (2020-05-12)
NIST scientists create new recipe for single-atom transistors
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues at the University of Maryland have developed a step-by-step recipe to produce single-atom transistors. (2020-05-11)
Bermudagrass harvest management options with poultry litter fertilization
Managing Harvests of 'Russell' and 'Tifton 44' Bermudagrass Receiving Broiler Litter for Phosphorus Removal and Nutritive Value (2020-04-30)
Poor coastal hypoxia and acidification policy leaves marine fisheries at risk
Current regulatory standards regarding the dissolved oxygen and pH levels of coastal waters have not kept pace with the scientific understanding of hypoxia and acidification, nor with the mounting evidence of their negative impact on coastal marine life. (2020-04-23)
Graphene heterostructures with black phosphorus, arsenic enable new infrared detectors
MIPT scientists and their colleagues from Japan and the U.S. (2020-04-13)
Skoltech researchers find a new HIT defense bacteria use against antibiotics
Scientists at the Severinov Laboratory in Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and the US have uncovered a new mechanism of bacterial self-defense against microcin C, a potent antibiotic weapon in the microscopic world that can sometimes turn on its master. (2020-04-11)
Peak district grasslands hold key to global plant diversity
Scientists at the University of Sheffield have found that plants are able to co-exist because they share key nutrients, using grasslands from the Peak District. (2020-03-23)
Salmon provide nutrients to Alaskan streambanks
Nutrient cycling of stream ecosystems dependent on portion of salmons' lifecycle. (2020-03-18)
Dams in the upper Mekong River modify nutrient bioavailability downstream
Chen et al. shed new light on the effects of hydropower dams on nutrient cycling and ecosystem functioning. (2020-03-17)
Recovering phosphorus from corn ethanol production can help reduce groundwater pollution
Dried distiller's grains with solubles (DDGS), a co-product from corn ethanol processing, is commonly used as feed for cattle, swine and poultry. (2020-03-06)
Marine cyanobacteria do not survive solely on photosynthesis
The University of Cordoba published a study in a journal from the Nature group that supports the idea that marine cyanobacteria also incorporate organic compounds from the environment. (2020-03-02)
Ocean changes almost starved life of oxygen
Chemical changes in the oceans more than 800 million years ago almost destroyed the oxygen-rich atmosphere that paved the way for complex life on Earth, new research suggests. (2020-03-02)
Breaking down stubborn molecules
Seawater is more than just saltwater. The ocean is a veritable soup of chemicals. (2020-02-26)
New torula yeast product as digestible as fish meal in weanling pig diets
Starting weanling pigs off with the right diet can make all the difference for the health and productivity of the animal. (2020-02-21)
Newly found bacteria fights climate change, soil pollutants
Cornell University researchers have found a new species of soil bacteria that is particularly adept at breaking down organic matter, including the cancer-causing chemicals that are released when coal, gas, oil and refuse are burned. (2020-02-20)
Vast amounts of valuable energy, nutrients, water lost in world's fast-rising wastewater streams
Vast amounts of valuable energy, agricultural nutrients, and water could potentially be recovered from the world's fast-rising volume of municipal wastewater, a new UN study says. (2020-02-03)
Urine fertilizer: 'Aging' effectively protects against transfer of antibiotic resistance
Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan. (2020-01-22)
New study highlights importance of grain foods in infant diets
Undertaken to inform the development of the first-ever Dietary Guidelines (2020-2025) to include specific recommendations for infants and toddlers, this study analyzed infant data from the 2001-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). (2020-01-21)
Chemists have managed to stabilize the 'capricious' phosphorus
An international team of Russian, Swedish and Ukrainian scientists has identified an effective strategy to improve the stability of two-dimensional black phosphorus, which is a promising material for use in optoelectronics. (2020-01-17)
How anti-sprawl policies may be harming water quality
Urban growth boundaries are created by governments in an effort to concentrate urban development -- buildings, roads and the utilities that support them -- within a defined area. (2020-01-16)
Astronomers reveal interstellar thread of one of life's building blocks
Phosphorus is an essential element for life as we know it. (2020-01-15)
'Resurrection ecology' of 600-year-old water fleas used to understand pollution adaptation
By taking advantage of the unique genomic model organism of tiny waterfleas, or Daphnia, an international team of researchers has now analyzed Daphnia from a phosphorus-rich Minnesota lake -- and compared it to revived, 600-year-old Daphnia dormant eggs found in the bottom sediments -- to better understand how these creatures cope with a dramatic environmental change. (2020-01-09)
Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus
Life as we know it requires phosphorus, and lots of it. (2019-12-30)
Helping plant nurseries reduce runoff
Researchers identify production strategies to help manage phosphorus. (2019-12-11)
Breathing new life into the rise of oxygen debate
New research strongly suggests that the distinct 'oxygenation events' that created Earth's breathable atmosphere happened spontaneously, rather than being a consequence of biological or tectonic revolutions. (2019-12-10)
Was Earth's oxygenation a gradual, not step-wise, process -- driven by internal feedbacks?
The oxygenation of Earth's surface -- which transformed the planet into a habitable haven for all life as we know it -- may have been the consequence of global biogeochemical feedbacks, rather than the product of discrete planetary-scale biological and tectonic revolutions as proposed, according to a new study. (2019-12-10)
Reservoir management could help prevent toxic algal blooms in Great Lakes
Managing reservoirs for water quality, not just flood control, could be part of the solution to the growth of toxic algal blooms in the Great Lakes, especially Lake Erie, every summer. (2019-11-19)
Evolution can reconfigure gene networks to deal with environmental change
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have unravelled the genetic mechanisms behind tiny waterfleas' ability to adapt to increased levels of phosphorus pollution in lakes. (2019-11-13)
Scientists study impact of sediments and nutrients from Conowingo Dam on Chesapeake Bay
A new study examines the influences of a river dam on the fate of sediments and nutrients on an estuary, using the Conowingo Dam and the Chesapeake Bay as a case study. (2019-11-11)
Reassessing strategies to reduce phosphorus levels in the Detroit river watershed
In an effort to control the cyanobacteria blooms and dead zones that plague Lake Erie each summer, fueled by excess nutrients, the United States and Canada in 2016 called for a 40% reduction in the amount of phosphorus entering the lake's western and central basins, including the Detroit River's contribution. (2019-11-06)
Researchers can now place single ions into solids
New technique enables implantation of individual ions into crystals with an accuracy of 35 nanometers. (2019-09-24)
Reduce, reuse, recycle: The future of phosphorus
Societies celebrate the discovery of this important element in 1669. (2019-09-16)
Brain-inspired computing could tackle big problems in a small way
While computers have become smaller and more powerful and supercomputers and parallel computing have become the standard, we are about to hit a wall in energy and miniaturization. (2019-09-13)
Lack of reporting on phosphorus supply chain dangerous for global food security
A new study from Stockholm University and University of Iceland shows that while Phosphorus is a key element to global food security, its supply chain is a black box. (2019-09-09)
Not all meat is created equal: How diet changes can sustain world's food production
David Vaccari, an environmental engineer at Stevens Institute of Technology, has created a model that predicts how several different conservation approaches could reduce demand for a nonrenewable resource that is absolutely vital for feeding the world: phosphorus. (2019-09-06)
Study reveals new patterns of key ocean nutrient
The important nutrient phosphate may be less abundant in the global ocean than previously thought, according to a new paper in Science Advances. (2019-09-05)
Flathead Bio Station researcher helps uncover ocean iron level mystery
In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a group of researchers uncovered the reason behind chemistry variations in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre ecosystem. (2019-08-29)
UCI-led study: Plankton are more resilient to nutrient stress than previously thought
Surface ocean phosphate is a key mineral supporting the growth and diversification of phytoplankton, a marine organism the absorbs significant amounts of carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere. (2019-08-28)
Bad Blooms: Researchers review environmental conditions leading to harmful algae blooms
When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animals. (2019-08-26)
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