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Current Phosphorus News and Events

Current Phosphorus News and Events, Phosphorus News Articles.
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Scientists study impact of sediments and nutrients from Conowingo Dam on Chesapeake Bay
A new study examines the influences of a river dam on the fate of sediments and nutrients on an estuary, using the Conowingo Dam and the Chesapeake Bay as a case study. (2019-11-11)
Reassessing strategies to reduce phosphorus levels in the Detroit river watershed
In an effort to control the cyanobacteria blooms and dead zones that plague Lake Erie each summer, fueled by excess nutrients, the United States and Canada in 2016 called for a 40% reduction in the amount of phosphorus entering the lake's western and central basins, including the Detroit River's contribution. (2019-11-06)
Researchers can now place single ions into solids
New technique enables implantation of individual ions into crystals with an accuracy of 35 nanometers. (2019-09-24)
Reduce, reuse, recycle: The future of phosphorus
Societies celebrate the discovery of this important element in 1669. (2019-09-16)
Brain-inspired computing could tackle big problems in a small way
While computers have become smaller and more powerful and supercomputers and parallel computing have become the standard, we are about to hit a wall in energy and miniaturization. (2019-09-13)
Lack of reporting on phosphorus supply chain dangerous for global food security
A new study from Stockholm University and University of Iceland shows that while Phosphorus is a key element to global food security, its supply chain is a black box. (2019-09-09)
Not all meat is created equal: How diet changes can sustain world's food production
David Vaccari, an environmental engineer at Stevens Institute of Technology, has created a model that predicts how several different conservation approaches could reduce demand for a nonrenewable resource that is absolutely vital for feeding the world: phosphorus. (2019-09-06)
Study reveals new patterns of key ocean nutrient
The important nutrient phosphate may be less abundant in the global ocean than previously thought, according to a new paper in Science Advances. (2019-09-05)
Flathead Bio Station researcher helps uncover ocean iron level mystery
In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a group of researchers uncovered the reason behind chemistry variations in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre ecosystem. (2019-08-29)
UCI-led study: Plankton are more resilient to nutrient stress than previously thought
Surface ocean phosphate is a key mineral supporting the growth and diversification of phytoplankton, a marine organism the absorbs significant amounts of carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere. (2019-08-28)
Bad Blooms: Researchers review environmental conditions leading to harmful algae blooms
When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animals. (2019-08-26)
Flame retardants -- from plants
Flame retardants are present in thousands of everyday items, from clothing to furniture to electronics. (2019-08-26)
Amazon rainforest absorbing less carbon than expected
An international team of scientists, including climate scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, found that accounting for phosphorus-deficient soils reduced projected carbon dioxide uptake by an average of 50% in the Amazon, compared to current estimates based on previous climate models that did not take into account phosphorus deficiency. (2019-08-20)
Stanford-led study gauges trees' potential to slow global warming in the future
By analyzing decades of experiments, the researchers mapped the potential of carbon dioxide to increase forest biomass by the end of the century, when atmospheric concentrations of the gas could nearly double. (2019-08-12)
Protein factors increasing yield of a biofuel precursor in microscopic algae
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kyoto University, Kazusa DNA Research Institute, and Tohoku University have identified a protein, Lipid Remodeling reguLator 1 (LRL1), in microscopic algae that is involved in the production of triacylglycerol, a biofuel precursor. (2019-08-08)
Fungi living in cattail roots could improve our picture of ancient ecoystems
Some fossil plants that lived in wetlands had fungi living in their roots, and others don't. (2019-08-08)
African smoke is fertilizing Amazon rainforest and oceans, new study finds
A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami's (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that smoke from fires in Africa may be the most important source of a key nutrient -- phosphorus -- that acts as a fertilizer in the Amazon rainforest, Tropical Atlantic and Southern oceans. (2019-07-29)
200 times faster than ever before: the speediest quantum operation yet
A group of physicists at UNSW Sydney have built a super-fast version of the central building block of a quantum computer. (2019-07-17)
Electronic chip mimics the brain to make memories in a flash
Engineers have mimicked the human brain with an electronic chip that uses light to create and modify memories. (2019-07-16)
Intake of phosphates: Babies, infants and children can exceed the health guidance values
Phosphates are essential substances that occur naturally in the human body and make up a considerable portion of our nutrition. (2019-07-16)
Plant nutrient detector breakthrough
Findings from La Trobe University-led research could lead to less fertilizer wastage, saving millions of dollars for Australian farmers. (2019-07-06)
Trees for water quality credits
In a new study, UC Santa Barbara Bren School professor Arturo Keller links reforestation to water quality credits. (2019-06-27)
Next-gen solar cells spin in new direction
A nanomaterial made from phosphorus, known as phosphorene, is shaping up as a key ingredient for more sustainable and efficient next-generation perovskite solar cells. (2019-06-21)
Plate tectonics may have driven 'Cambrian Explosion, study shows
The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist. (2019-06-19)
Hydrogenation of white phosphorus leads way to safer chemical technology
White phosphorus is well-known for being a highly toxic compound with suffocating scent. (2019-06-18)
Scientists unearth green treasure -- albeit rusty -- in the soil
Cornell University engineers have taken a step in understanding how iron in the soil may unlock naturally occurring phosphorus bound in organic matter, which can be used in fertilizer, so that one day farmers may be able to reduce the amount of artificial fertilizers applied to fields. (2019-06-17)
2019 'dead zone' may be the second largest on record
A recent forecast of the size of the 'Dead Zone' in the northern Gulf of Mexico for late July 2019 is that it will cover 8,717-square-miles of the bottom of the continental shelf off Louisiana and Texas. (2019-06-10)
Scientists discover unlikely culprit for fertilizing North Pacific Ocean: Asian dust
The vast subtropical 'gyres' -- large systems of rotating currents in the middle of the oceans -- cover 40% of the Earth's surface and have long been considered biological deserts with stratified waters that contain very little nutrients to sustain life. (2019-06-10)
Mathematically designed graphene has improved electrocatalytic activity
An international research group has improved graphene's ability to catalyze the 'hydrogen evolution reaction,' which releases hydrogen as a result of passing an electronic current through water. (2019-05-24)
Ammonium fertilized early life on earth
A Syracuse University professor has demonstrated that ammonium -- an odiferous chemical compound, often used in fertilizer -- was a vital source of nitrogen for early life on Earth. (2019-05-21)
Manipulating atoms one at a time with an electron beam
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have found a way to manipulate the positions of individual atoms on a graphene sheet, which could be a first step to new quantum computing and sensing devices. (2019-05-17)
Clinical trial at IU School of Medicine improves treatment of genetic rickets
A new study shows a drug developed in conjuction with investigators at Indiana University School of Medicine to alleviate symptoms of a rare musculoskeletal condition is significantly more effective than conventional therapies. (2019-05-17)
Where there's waste there's fertilizer
Scientists recycle phosphorus by combining dairy and water treatment leftovers. (2019-05-15)
Getting fertilizer in the right place at the right rate
In-soil placement of phosphorus can decrease phosphorus loss in snowmelt runoff (2019-04-24)
Plants and microbes shape global biomes through local underground alliances
Princeton University researchers report that the distribution of forest types worldwide is based on the relationships plant species forged with soil microbes to enhance their uptake of nutrients. (2019-04-17)
Why researchers are mapping the world's manure
Farmers rely on phosphorus fertilizers to enrich the soil and ensure bountiful harvests, but the world's recoverable reserves of phosphate rocks, from which such fertilizers are produced, are finite and unevenly distributed. (2019-04-17)
Study questions the sustainability of plant ingredients as fishmeal substitutes
Substituting fishmeal in aquaculture feeds with plant ingredients may not be as beneficial for the environment as many predict, according to new research from an international team of experts. (2019-04-12)
Wonder material: Individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time
Tiny, individual, flexible ribbons of crystalline phosphorus have been made by UCL researchers in a world first, and they could revolutionise electronics and fast-charging battery technology. (2019-04-10)
Manure application changes with winter crop can cut nitrogen loss, boost profits
Dairy farmers in the Northeast can improve water quality and boost the profitability of their operations by changing the timing and method of applying manure to their fields in the fall, along with planting rye as a cover crop between corn crops -- or by double-cropping rye and corn, according to Penn State researchers. (2019-04-02)
Decision makers need contextual interactive guidance
As decision makers balance economic, environmental and social aspects of living, planners and others need decision-making tools that support the process, but do not dictate the outcomes, so that trade-off choices can reflect a wide array of needs, according to a team of researchers who looked at an interactive program using trade-off diagrams. (2019-03-28)
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