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Current Photosynthesis News and Events

Current Photosynthesis News and Events, Photosynthesis News Articles.
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The global distribution of freshwater plants is controlled by catchment characteristics
Unlike land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to CO2 to compensate for the low availability of CO2 in water. (2019-11-15)
Catchment geology rules freshwater plant communities
Whether freshwater plant communities use carbon dioxide or bicarbonate for photosynthesis is largely related to the bicarbonate concentration in their local environment, according to a new study, the first global evaluation of bicarbonate use among aquatic plants. (2019-11-14)
ASU study shows some aquatic plants depend on the landscape for photosynthesis
ASU researchers found that not only are freshwater aquatic plants affected by climate, they are also shaped by the surrounding landscape. (2019-11-14)
Experts unlock key to photosynthesis, a find that could help us meet food security demands
Scientists have solved the structure of one of the key components of photosynthesis, a discovery that could lead to photosynthesis being 'redesigned' to achieve higher yields and meet urgent food security needs. (2019-11-13)
Too much sugar doesn't put the brakes on turbocharged crops
Plants make sugars to form leaves to grow and produce grains and fruits through the process of photosynthesis, but sugar accumulation can also slow down photosynthesis. (2019-11-11)
Scientists create 'artificial leaf' that turns carbon into fuel
Scientists have created an 'artificial leaf' to fight climate change by inexpensively converting harmful carbon dioxide (CO2) into a useful alternative fuel. (2019-11-04)
The world is getting wetter, yet water may become less available for North America and Eurasia
With climate change, plants of the future will consume more water than in the present day, leading to less water available for people living in North America and Eurasia, according to a Dartmouth-led study in Nature Geoscience The research suggests a drier future despite anticipated precipitation increases for places like the United States and Europe, populous regions already facing water stresses. (2019-11-04)
Tethered chem combos could revolutionize artificial photosynthesis
Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have doubled the efficiency of a chemical combo that captures light and splits water molecules so the building blocks can be used to produce hydrogen fuel. (2019-11-04)
Retrieving physical properties from two-colour laser experiments
Analytical and numerical analysis gives the first indications of how physically useful information can be extracted from two-colour pump probe experiments, and how it can be distinguished from the signatures arising from the initial infrared laser, according to an article in EPJ D. (2019-10-25)
Building blocks of all life gain new understanding
New research on an enzyme that is essential for photosynthesis and all life on earth has uncovered a key finding in its structure which reveals how light can interact with matter to make an essential pigment for life. (2019-10-23)
Biological material boosts solar cell performance
Next-generation solar cells that mimic photosynthesis with biological material may give new meaning to the term 'green technology.' Adding the protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to perovskite solar cells boosted the efficiency of the devices in a series of laboratory tests, according to an international team of researchers. (2019-10-22)
It takes two -- a two-atom catalyst, that is -- to make oxygen from water
The search for sustainable approaches to generating new fuels has brought scientists back to one of the most abundant materials on Earth -- reddish iron oxide in the form of hematite, also known as rust. (2019-10-21)
OU-led study reveals dry season increase in photosynthesis in Amazon rain forest
A University of Oklahoma-led study demonstrated the potential of the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument on board the Copernicus Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite to measure and track chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis of tropical forests in the Amazon. (2019-10-21)
Photosynthesis olympics: can the best wheat varieties be even better?
Scientists have put elite wheat varieties through a sort of 'Photosynthesis Olympics' to find which varieties have the best performing photosynthesis. (2019-10-17)
Three research papers published in Nature series journals
Department of Applied Physics of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) contributed 3 research papers that were recently published in the Nature series journals, which are among the most authoritative and recognized scientific journals in the world that publish high-quality research in all fields of science and technology. (2019-10-17)
Protein that triggers plant defences to light stress identified
A newly discovered protein turns on plants' cellular defence to excessive light and other stress factors caused by a changing climate, according to a new study published in eLife. (2019-10-15)
Identifying a cyanobacterial gene family that helps control photosynthesis
A new Michigan State University study has identified a family of genes in cyanobacteria that help control carbon dioxide fixation. (2019-10-08)
Scientists find ways to improve cassava, a 'crop of inequality' featured at Goalkeepers
Today, as world leaders gather for the UN General Assembly, hundreds of emerging leaders focused on fighting global inequality came together at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's third annual Goalkeepers event in New York City. (2019-09-25)
Peatlands trap CO2, even during droughts
French scientists studied the two species of moss that make up the peatland. (2019-09-17)
Algae and bacteria team up to increase hydrogen production
A University of Cordoba research group combined algae and bacteria in order to produce biohydrogen, fuel of the future (2019-09-16)
Terahertz waves reveal hidden processes in ultrafast artificial photosynthesis
Osaka University researchers have succeeded in observing charge transfer and intermolecular interactions in ultrafast artificial photosynthesis. (2019-09-12)
SPEECHLESS, SCREAM and stomata development in plant leaves
A Nagoya University and Washington University-led team of scientists with two disparate sets of expertise -- in plant biology and protein structural chemistry -- have unraveled the atomic basis of how optimal numbers of stomata are made in leaves. (2019-09-05)
How plants measure their carbon dioxide uptake
Plants face a dilemma in dry conditions: they have to seal themselves off to prevent losing too much water but this also limits their uptake of carbon dioxide. (2019-08-26)
Early life on Earth limited by enzyme
A single enzyme found in early single-cell life forms could explain why oxygen levels in the atmosphere remained low for two billion years during the Proterozoic eon, preventing life colonizing land, suggests a UCL-led study. (2019-08-22)
Scientists find precise control of terminal division during plant stomatal development
A research group led by Prof. LE Jie at the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found a genetic suppressor of flp stomatal defects. (2019-08-20)
Discovery of a bottleneck relief in photosynthesis may have a major impact on food crops
Scientists have found how to relieve a bottleneck in the process by which plants transform sunlight into food, which may lead to an increase in crop production. (2019-08-16)
Scientists discover key factors in how some algae harness solar energy
Scientists have discovered how diatoms -- a type of alga that produce 20% of the Earth's oxygen -- harness solar energy for photosynthesis. (2019-08-13)
Satellite study reveals that area emits one billion tonnes of carbon
A vast region of Africa affected by drought and changing land use emits as much carbon dioxide each year as 200 million cars, research suggests. (2019-08-13)
Cell biology: Compartments and complexity
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists have taken a closer look at the subcellular distribution of proteins and metabolic intermediates in a model plant. (2019-08-13)
A marine microbe could play increasingly important role in regulating climate
Marine microbes with a special metabolism are ubiquitous and could play an important role in how Earth regulates climate. (2019-08-07)
The surprising merit of giant clam feces
Young giant clams get necessary symbiotic algae from the feces of their parents, updating the age-old adage: one clam's trash is another clam's treasure. (2019-08-07)
Missing link in algal photosynthesis found, offers opportunity to improve crop yields
Photosynthesis is the natural process plants and algae utilize to capture sunlight and fix carbon dioxide into energy-rich sugars that fuel growth, development, and in the case of crops, yield. (2019-08-05)
Discovery of non-blooming orchid on Japanese subtropical islands
A group of Japanese scientists has discovered a new orchid species on Japan's subtropical islands of Amami-Oshima and Tokunoshima that bears fruit without once opening its flowers. (2019-08-02)
Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis
Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed. (2019-07-25)
A toxic chemical in marine ecosystems turns out to play a beneficial role
Destructive free radicals -- known as reactive oxygen species -- are thought to degrade the cells of phytoplankton and other organisms. (2019-07-22)
Spawn of the triffid? Tiny organisms give us glimpse into complex evolutionary tale
Two newly discovered organisms point to the existence of an ancient organism that resembled a tiny version of the lumbering, human-eating science fiction plants known as 'triffids,' according to research in Nature. (2019-07-17)
How multicellular cyanobacteria transport molecules
Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Tübingen have taken a high-resolution look at the structure and function of cell-to-cell connections in filamentous, multicellular cyanobacteria. (2019-07-12)
Improved model could help scientists better predict crop yield, climate change effects
A new computer model incorporates how microscopic pores on leaves may open in response to light -- an advance that could help scientists create virtual plants to predict how higher temperatures and rising levels of carbon dioxide will affect food crops. (2019-07-09)
Symbiotic upcycling: Turning 'low value' compounds into biomass
Kentron, a bacterial symbiont of ciliates, turns cellular waste products into biomass. (2019-06-25)
Research details response of sagebrush to 2017 solar eclipse
The short period of darkness caused a significant reduction in photosynthesis and transpiration in the desert shrub, but not quite to the levels of nighttime, according to some of the most detailed research on plant response to solar eclipses ever reported. (2019-06-20)
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