Current Physician News and Events

Current Physician News and Events, Physician News Articles.
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U.S. should look at how other high-income countries regulate health care costs
Structuring negotiations between insurers and providers, standardizing fee-for-service payments and negotiating prices can lower the United States' health care spending by slowing the rate at which healthcare prices increase, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-11-22)

Study finds patients prefer doctors who share their same race/ethnicity
Patients who shared the same racial or ethnic background as their physician were more likely to give the maximum patient rating score, according to a new analysis of 117,589 patient surveys from 2014 to 2017. (2020-11-09)

Cannabis use prompts need for more anesthesia during surgery, increases pain
Not only might cannabis users require more anesthesia during surgery than non-users, they may have increased pain afterwards and use higher doses of opioids while in the hospital, suggests first-of-its kind research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-05)

AI predicts patients at highest risk for severe pain, increased opioid use post-surgery
Artificial intelligence (AI) used in machine learning models can predict which patients are at highest risk for severe pain after surgery, and help determine who would most benefit from personalized pain management plans that use non-opioid alternatives, suggests new research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-04)

Significant decline in prescription opioid abuse seen among Americans at last
Almost 20 years into the opioid epidemic, there finally is evidence of significant and continual decreases in the abuse of these risky pain medications, according to an analysis of national data being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. (2020-10-03)

Improved physician-patient relationships are associated with improved health
This study found an association between improved physician-patient relationships and improved patient-reported health status. Researchers at Case Western Reserve University found over a one-year period that while consistent access to a provider is important, the quality of each clinical encounter is equally as important in shaping a patient's reported overall health outcomes, as measured by the SF-12 quality of life questionnaire. (2020-09-15)

Study: Vitamin D deficiency may raise risk of getting COVID-19
In a retrospective study of patients tested for COVID-19, researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine found an association between vitamin D deficiency and the likelihood of becoming infected with the coronavirus. The findings were published Sept. 3, 2020 in JAMA Network Open. (2020-09-03)

Gout treatment may aid patients with congenital heart disease
A drug used to treat gout, probenecid, may improve heart function in individuals with a particular heart defect, according to results from a small pilot study run by a University of Cincinnati researcher. Individuals with congenital univentricular circulation ran better and their heart performed better while taking probenecid. The change was small partially because of the small number of study participants. (2020-08-27)

New Analysis Reveals Worsening Shortage of Emergency Physicians in Rural Areas
Despite the nation's growing reliance on emergency departments, large areas of rural America are experiencing shortages emergency physicians, according to a new emergency medicine workforce analysis in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2020-08-12)

Greater financial integration generally not associated with better healthcare quality
New findings from a Dartmouth-led study, published in the August issue of Health Affairs, show that larger, more integrated healthcare systems do not generally deliver better quality care, and that there is significant variation in quality scores across hospitals and physician practices, regardless of whether they are independent or owned by larger systems. Policy makers should ensure that mergers or acquisitions due to pandemic-associated financial stress adhere to current antitrust law. (2020-08-03)

Machine learning accurately predicts who's who in the health care workforce
Until recently, economists, policy makers and workforce experts have relied on outdated and inaccurate snapshots of the US physician workforce, making it especially difficult to predict the need and availability of health care services across the country. In this study, Wingrove et al examine how machine learning algorithms may allow for more real-time, accurate descriptions of the medical workforce. (2020-07-14)

Study finds HCV-positive livers safe for transplantation; Patients cured afterward
UC researchers find similar results for positive outcomes when comparing patients receiving livers infected with hepatitis C to patients who receive livers without infection. (2020-06-22)

Racial, gender disparities observed in heart transplant recipients with COVID-19 infection
Researchers suggest focusing on disparities to help identify which patients with a heart transplant may be at higher risk for a worse course of COVID-19 infection. (2020-06-09)

Integrating behavioral health services into medical practices faces barriers
Many people do not receive treatment for their mental health problems because of a shortage of providers and lack of access to mental health services, but one solution is to integrate mental health treatment into medical care. A new study finds that integrating behavioral health services into physician medical practices faces cultural and financial barriers, but providing technical support and improved payment models may enhance the long-term sustainability of the approach. (2020-06-02)

Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents and fellows by researchers at Northwestern Medicine and Cleveland Clinic found that no such generational gap exists. (2020-05-05)

Position statement highlights importance of sleep for physician self-care
Physician burnout is a significantly underappreciated public safety issue, and sleep loss is often overlooked as a contributing factor, according to a new position statement published by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2020-03-30)

Female physicians drive unfunded research on pay disparity
Physician gender pay gaps continue to persist in the US despite an impressive body of research spanning more than 25 years. While men have a larger representation within academic medical leadership, a new study publish in JAMA Open has found that women are significantly overrepresented as the authors and disseminators of physician compensation studies and this research is largely unfunded. (2020-03-26)

American College of Cardiology issues clinical competencies for cardiovascular NPs, PAs
The American College of Cardiology has released the 2020 Clinical Competencies for Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants in Adult Cardiovascular Medicine, identifying the knowledge and skills that are important for nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) working in general cardiovascular medicine and cardiovascular medicine subspecialty areas. This is the first competency statement issued for non-physician members of the cardiovascular care team. (2020-03-20)

Physician psychotherapy unavailable to 97% of people with urgent mental health need
Publicly funded physician psychotherapy is only available to a fraction of those with urgent mental health needs in Ontario, according to a joint study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and ICES published today in CMAJ Open. (2020-03-11)

ASA survey shows health insurers abruptly terminating physician contracts
A new national survey from the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) finds physician anesthesiologists are being forced out of network as insurance companies terminate their contracts, often with little or no notice. (2020-02-27)

Study investigates moral distress of physicians who care for older adults
Researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine report that about four of 10 doctors caring for older adult patients who require a surrogate decision-maker experienced moral distress. (2020-02-25)

ER patients may care less about a doctor's race and gender than previously thought
When a patient goes to an ER today, they have a higher chance than before of seeing a doctor who's a woman or a person of color. And they're also more likely to get a survey after they go home, asking how satisfied they were with their care. A new study may help allay worries about the potential impact of underlying patient bias on those ratings. (2020-02-21)

Researchers say extended antidepressant use creates physical dependence
Researchers explain symptoms associated with Antidepressant Discontinuation Syndrome and provide a schedule for tapering various classes of antidepressants. Patients who stop medication without tapering often experience flulike symptoms, insomnia, nausea, imbalance, sensory disturbances often described as electric shocks or 'brain zaps', and hyperarousal. (2020-02-20)

When the best treatment for hypertension is to wait
A new study concluded that a physician's decision not to intensify hypertension treatment is often a contextually appropriate choice. In two-thirds of cases where physicians did not change treatment for patients with hypertension, patients' blood pressure returned to normal in follow-up readings taken at home. (2020-02-18)

Unmet need for physicians, services among US adults
Twenty years of survey data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were used to examine the unmet need to see a physician and for services among insured and uninsured adults from 1998 to 2017, a time of change in the U.S. health care system that included passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (2020-01-27)

New Dartmouth study explores prevalence of drug promotions in primary care practices
A new Dartmouth study finds that pharmaceutical companies' promotional access to outpatient practices that deliver primary care in the US is substantial, especially in smaller practices, those outside of healthcare systems, and those without academic affiliation, possibly impacting prescribing quality and cost. (2020-01-27)

Engagement and education key to changing attitudes towards virginity testing
Virginity testing is a complex, culturally mediated practice that is poorly understood by Western clinicians. Although there is published literature on the ethics of 'virginity' testing and on the lack of reliability of a hymen examination to determine 'virginity,' little practical guidance has been published for clinicians who may encounter requests for virginity testing in the clinical setting. (2020-01-21)

Older adults use online physician ratings, but view them cautiously, poll shows
Find a restaurant. Book a hotel. Choose a product to buy. Online ratings and reviews from other customers can help with making decisions on all of these, and their use has exploded in the past decade. But online ratings of physicians? A new poll suggests they don't yet hold as much sway with the Americans who use the most health care: people over age 50. (2020-01-06)

Structured, salary-only compensation plan for physicians is a model for pay equity
Gender pay equity in the field of medicine remains elusive. Gender-based pay differences have been shown to persist, even when controlling for experience, clinical productivity, academic rank and other factors. These inequities result in significantly lower lifetime earnings, job burnout and negative attitudes toward work, and adverse effects on the profession and society. (2020-01-02)

Celebrated ancient Egyptian woman physician likely never existed, says researcher
For decades, an ancient Egyptian known as Merit Ptah has been celebrated as the first female physician and a role model for women entering medicine. Yet a researcher from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus now says she never existed and is an example of how misconceptions can spread. (2019-12-16)

MA physician assistant programs adopt first-in-nation partnership to prevent opioid abuse
Morbidity and mortality from prescription and synthetic opioid use and abuse continues to be a U.S. public health issue. In an effort to help curtail this crisis, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) describe an approach to ensure Physician Assistant (PA) students graduating from any PA program in Massachusetts will have the knowledge and skills to prescribe opiates safely. (2019-12-03)

Study shows lower mortality from induction of labor at 41 weeks
Inducing labor after 41 instead of 42 full weeks' pregnancy appears to be safer in terms of perinatal survival, new Swedish research shows. The current study is expected to provide a key piece of evidence for upcoming decisions in maternity care. (2019-11-21)

Contacts with primary care physicians did not increase after the Affordable Care Act
At the same time the Affordable Care Act increased the number of insured Americans, analysis of health care industry data shows a continued decline in contact with primary care physician services. (2019-11-12)

Australia's rural doctors speak up to boost regional health services
A national study has found that longer rural doctor postings and more rural training positions are needed to provide regional areas with the right doctor, at the right time and in the right place. (2019-11-05)

One in four oncologists fails to mention cost when discussing genomic testing
Nearly one in four oncologists discussing genomic testing with their patients rarely or never discusses the costs of testing, according to a new study led by American Cancer Society investigators. (2019-11-01)

Many women and health care providers assume CBD safe during pregnancy despite lack of research
While most women of childbearing age understand drinking alcohol while pregnant is harmful, they may be less skeptical about the safety of cannabidiol (CBD), even though there is no evidence to support that belief, suggests a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. (2019-10-20)

One-third of children having tonsillectomies benefitted from opioid-free surgery and recovery
Nearly one-third of children who had surgery to remove their tonsils did not need opioids to get adequate pain relief during and after surgery, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. (2019-10-20)

Colorectal surgery patients use fewer opioids, report less pain with enhanced recovery after surgery
Colorectal surgery patients who were a part of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program had less pain, while using nearly half as many opioids, according to research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. (2019-10-19)

40% of people did not visit a family doctor after being released from prison
A new study analyzing the experiences of people released from provincial prison in Ontario in 2010 has found that 60% of people who were in Ontario's prison system were seen by a family doctor in the two years after being released from prison compared to 85% of people in the general population. (2019-10-11)

BU finds physical therapy access may reduce opioid prescriptions
Low back pain is one of the most common conditions Americans seek care for--and one of the more common reasons for an opioid prescription. Facing the opioid crisis, the American College of Physicians and the CDC now recommend first trying non-pharmacological treatments for low back pain. (2019-09-30)

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