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Current Physicians News and Events, Physicians News Articles.
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Blood test may point to patients at higher risk for COVID-19 deterioration, death
George Washington University researchers found five biomarkers associated with higher odds of clinical deterioration and death in COVID-19 patients. (2020-08-06)
Physician practices with more female doctors have smallest gender pay gaps
A study shows female physicians have more equitable income when they work in practices with more doctors who are women. (2020-07-30)
Doctors motivated by both health, malpractice concerns when ordering additional tests
A UCLA-led study has found that dermatopathologists, who specialize in diagnosing skin diseases at the microscopic level, are motivated both by patient safety concerns and by malpractice fears -- often simultaneously -- when ordering multiple tests and obtaining second opinions, with a higher proportion of these doctors reporting patient safety as a concern. (2020-07-17)
Graduates of family medicine residencies are likely to enter and remain in family medicine
This study provides an overview of the characteristics of physicians who completed family medicine residency training from 1994 to 2017. (2020-07-14)
To support lactating emergency physicians, consider these strategies
A new paper highlights strategies that emergency departments can implement to support lactating emergency physicians. (2020-06-30)
The impact of disclosure laws on prescription patterns from companies that pay them
It's not uncommon for U.S. pharmaceutical companies to pay medical doctors to promote their medications. (2020-06-08)
New review helps translate probiotic science into practical primary care recommendations
Probiotic supplements are widely available and are promoted as a general way to support the gut microbiome and promote health. (2020-06-01)
Women almost twice as likely to choose primary care as men
Analysis of osteopathic medical school survey data reveals women are 1.75 times more likely to choose primary care than men, according to a study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. (2020-05-26)
#Thisisourlane: How physicians can take action to reduce gun violence
As strategies to curb gun violence at the federal level have stalled, leaders in primary care and health policy have identified the role doctors can play in national gun safety efforts and the prevention of firearm suicide. (2020-05-12)
After cancer: The role of primary care in cancer survivorship care
Primary care physicians are treating an increasing number of cancer survivors, yet they have no clear guidance on how best to care for such patients. (2020-05-12)
Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents and fellows by researchers at Northwestern Medicine and Cleveland Clinic found that no such generational gap exists. (2020-05-05)
Financial incentives boost doctor training in opioid treatment medication
Offering $750 to emergency medicine physicians exponentially increased those trained to prescribe buprenorphine. (2020-05-05)
Nearly one-third of primary care providers do not view medication treatment for opioid use disorder as effective
A new survey of US primary care physicians from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that nearly one-third, 32.9 percent, do not think treating opioid use disorder with medication is any more effective than treatment without medication. (2020-04-29)
Survey finds physicians struggle to communicate positive thyroid cancer prognosis
Despite excellent prognosis with most thyroid cancers, many newly diagnosed patients have cancer-related worry, and physicians vary in their responses to patients' worry, according to new research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-31)
Physician psychotherapy unavailable to 97% of people with urgent mental health need
Publicly funded physician psychotherapy is only available to a fraction of those with urgent mental health needs in Ontario, according to a joint study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and ICES published today in CMAJ Open. (2020-03-11)
Residencies must train residents to treat substance use disorder among pregnant women
Early-career family physicians who both provide maternity care and prescribe buprenorphine -- a medication used to treat opioid use disorder -- primarily completed their training in a small number of residency programs. (2020-03-09)
Differences between self-identified general practitioners and board-certified family doctors
Physicians who identify as 'general practitioners' are a group distinct from board-certified 'family physicians,' according to a new study that was supported, in part, by the American Board of Family Medicine Foundation. (2020-03-09)
Dental teams could play an important role in early diagnosis of Type 2 and pre-diabetes
Dental professionals could play a vital role in the diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes as well as identifying those at a high risk of developing the condition, new research by a team at the University of Birmingham's School of Dentistry has found. (2020-03-04)
Social factors play a key role in missed well-child care visits
Despite the benefits of well-child care visits (WCV), up to half of WCVs are missed. (2020-02-18)
America's largest medical specialty society endorses single-payer Medicare for All
Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP) today welcomed the American College of Physicians' (ACP) endorsement of single-payer Medicare for All. (2020-01-20)
Cannabis edibles present novel health risks
With the recent legalization of cannabis edibles in Canada, physicians and the public must be aware of the novel risks of cannabis edibles, argue authors in a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-01-06)
American College of Physicians issues guideline for testosterone treatment in adult men
Physicians should prescribe testosterone for men with age-related low testosterone only to treat sexual dysfunction, the American College of Physicians says in a new evidence-based clinical practice guideline published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-01-06)
Researchers say 30% of patients taking opioids experience adverse drug interactions
A new article outlines common drug-drug interactions that alter how the body metabolizes certain opioids, causing decreased efficacy that ultimately can lead to misuse and overdose. (2019-12-10)
Major political events linked to mood decline among young US doctors
Major political events, such as the 2016 presidential election and inauguration, were associated with declines in mood among young US physicians, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2019-12-09)
Pot while pregnant: UNLV medicine doctors urge caution
Daily marijuana use during pregnancy may lead to an increased risk of low birth weight, low resistance to infection, decreased oxygen levels and other negative fetal health outcomes, according to a new study from a team of UNLV Medicine doctors. (2019-12-02)
Ontario physicians do not need consent to withhold CPR that they feel will not benefit patients
In August, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice dismissed a malpractice lawsuit filed against two physicians who refused to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to an 88-year-old man with multiple comorbidities and multiorgan failure. (2019-11-25)
A national decline in primary care visits associated with more comprehensive visits and electronic follow-up
The number of primary care visits may be declining nationally, but analysis reveals that in-person visits have become more comprehensive and follow-up care has moved online. (2019-11-12)
Associations between burnout and practice organization in family physicians
With the rate of burnout as high as 63% among family physicians, it is important to identify risk factors for physician burnout. (2019-11-12)
Australia's rural doctors speak up to boost regional health services
A national study has found that longer rural doctor postings and more rural training positions are needed to provide regional areas with the right doctor, at the right time and in the right place. (2019-11-05)
Survey reveals the hidden costs of care cascades
Just about any medical test can turn up an incidental finding that leads to a cascade of follow-up tests. (2019-10-29)
Study examines care for knee osteoarthritis in the United States
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research provides an overview of US physicians' recommendations for physical therapy, lifestyle counseling, pain medications for treating knee osteoarthritis. (2019-10-09)
Inconsistencies between electronic health record, physicians' observed behaviors
A study of nine emergency department residents reports inconsistencies between the electronic medical record and physicians' behaviors observed and recorded during patient encounters. (2019-09-18)
Study changes guidelines for sepsis management
University of Arizona Health Sciences researcher ends debate among physicians regarding sepsis management. (2019-09-17)
Research shows TCOM and osteopathic approach making a difference
The 2.5-year study, conducted by the PRECISION Pain Research Registry and TCOM's John Licciardone, D.O., M.S., M.B.A., reaffirmed the importance of empathy and better interpersonal manner when treating patients with chronic pain. (2019-08-19)
Early-career female physicians experience obstacles to professional and academic success
Individual and systemic challenges specific to female family physicians in their first five years of practice create obstacles that can result in disproportionate rates of burnout and negative impacts on career trajectories, according to a new paper co-authored by Dr. (2019-08-14)
Professional coaching alleviates burnout symptoms in physicians
Medical doctors in the United States are twice as likely to experience symptoms of burnout as other workers, which can compromise quality of care and place patients at risk. (2019-08-05)
Burnout symptoms associated with racial bias in medical residents
Mayo Clinic researchers have found an association between increased symptoms of burnout and heightened racial bias in medical residents. (2019-07-26)
Survey finds patients want more guidance from physicians on self-care
Physicians and consumers agree that self-care is important to health, yet 75% of patients say they haven't discussed it with their physician within the last two years, according to a new survey released today, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. (2019-07-23)
Survey finds physicians struggle with their own self-care
Despite believing that self-care is a vitally important part of health and overall well-being, many physicians overlook their own self-care, according to a new survey released today, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. (2019-07-23)
Patients want physicians more involved in their health outside of the doctor's office
A media briefing on a nationwide survey of physicians and consumers conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs on:How consumers and physicians define self-care. (2019-07-22)
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