Current Physicians News and Events

Current Physicians News and Events, Physicians News Articles.
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Limited access to buprenorphine restricts resident physicians treating opioid abusers
A University of South Florida Health-led survey of resident physicians in Florida indicates they are interested in treating opioid addiction but face barriers to offering patients treatment using buprenorphine, an FDA-approved medication shown to successfully decrease opioid use, overdose events, and deaths associated with opioids. Many states have reported increased deaths from opioids since the COVID-19 epidemic began, underscoring the need to remove barriers to care. (2020-11-20)

Researchers examine if online physician reviews indicate clinical outcomes
Dr. Atanu Lahiri and Dr. Zhiqiang Zheng studied the relationship between online reviews of physicians and their patients' actual clinical outcomes. They wanted to know how much consumers can rely on the reviews, specifically in regard to chronic-disease care. (2020-11-09)

Study finds patients prefer doctors who share their same race/ethnicity
Patients who shared the same racial or ethnic background as their physician were more likely to give the maximum patient rating score, according to a new analysis of 117,589 patient surveys from 2014 to 2017. (2020-11-09)

Time is not on their side: physicians face barriers to voting
Two new UT Southwestern studies published today report some surprising findings: Only half of practicing physicians are registered to vote, and the most common obstacle faced by resident physicians is the lack of time to vote. The researchers say finding ways to increase voter participation among doctors is critical as the nation tackles health care issues. (2020-10-22)

Prevalence of suicide-related behaviors among physicians
An analysis of published studies has found a relatively high prevalence of suicidal behaviors among physicians. The findings are published in Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior. (2020-10-07)

The public charge rule: What physicians can do to support immigrant health
Physicians from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine summarize current knowledge on the public benefits included in the 'public charge' rule and offer suggestions for family physicians to support the health of their immigrant patients and families. The authors conclude that 'family physicians can effectively respond to patient and immigrant community concerns about these changes by providing outreach education, access to primary health care, and referrals to legal and social services.' (2020-09-15)

Mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic: A call for action
The inclusion of mental health as part of national public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic is mandatory in assisting all those in need. (2020-08-30)

New Analysis Reveals Worsening Shortage of Emergency Physicians in Rural Areas
Despite the nation's growing reliance on emergency departments, large areas of rural America are experiencing shortages emergency physicians, according to a new emergency medicine workforce analysis in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2020-08-12)

Some physicians are ordering thyroid tests for unsupported reasons
Up to one-third of physicians reported sending patients for a thyroid ultrasound for reasons not supported by clinical care guidelines, a new study led by University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center researchers finds. Routine use of ultrasounds to detect cancerous thyroid nodules have led to a significant increase in thyroid cancer cases in recent years, although many are low-risk and unlikely to cause serious harm. (2020-08-12)

Blood test may point to patients at higher risk for COVID-19 deterioration, death
George Washington University researchers found five biomarkers associated with higher odds of clinical deterioration and death in COVID-19 patients. The study was published in Future Medicine. (2020-08-06)

Physician practices with more female doctors have smallest gender pay gaps
A study shows female physicians have more equitable income when they work in practices with more doctors who are women. The analysis shows a 12 percent relative difference in income for practices with equal numbers of female and male physicians, compared with a 20 percent income difference in practices dominated by men. The findings offer important evidence that workplace diversity can help reduce earnings gaps, other inequities. (2020-07-30)

Doctors motivated by both health, malpractice concerns when ordering additional tests
A UCLA-led study has found that dermatopathologists, who specialize in diagnosing skin diseases at the microscopic level, are motivated both by patient safety concerns and by malpractice fears -- often simultaneously -- when ordering multiple tests and obtaining second opinions, with a higher proportion of these doctors reporting patient safety as a concern. (2020-07-17)

Graduates of family medicine residencies are likely to enter and remain in family medicine
This study provides an overview of the characteristics of physicians who completed family medicine residency training from 1994 to 2017. It serves to update the only previous comprehensive national review of this kind, conducted in 1996, which covered family medicine graduates from 1969 through 1993. (2020-07-14)

To support lactating emergency physicians, consider these strategies
A new paper highlights strategies that emergency departments can implement to support lactating emergency physicians. (2020-06-30)

The impact of disclosure laws on prescription patterns from companies that pay them
It's not uncommon for U.S. pharmaceutical companies to pay medical doctors to promote their medications. Questions over possible conflicts of interest have led to introduction of laws that require payment disclosure so that the public can see which pharmaceutical companies are paying which doctors. (2020-06-08)

New review helps translate probiotic science into practical primary care recommendations
Probiotic supplements are widely available and are promoted as a general way to support the gut microbiome and promote health. A new publication in the Journal of Family Practice summarizes the latest evidence on using probiotics for a variety of specific health conditions, providing practical recommendations to assist primary care physicians in advising their patients. The article, authored by current International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics board members. (2020-06-01)

Women almost twice as likely to choose primary care as men
Analysis of osteopathic medical school survey data reveals women are 1.75 times more likely to choose primary care than men, according to a study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Researchers sought to understand factors that increase the likelihood of specializing in primary care. (2020-05-26)

#Thisisourlane: How physicians can take action to reduce gun violence
As strategies to curb gun violence at the federal level have stalled, leaders in primary care and health policy have identified the role doctors can play in national gun safety efforts and the prevention of firearm suicide. In this pair of recommendation papers, clinicians place themselves at the front lines of this public health issue and offer a call to action for the medical community. Both papers lay out a grassroots course of action to help physicians engage with their patients and policy makers. (2020-05-12)

After cancer: The role of primary care in cancer survivorship care
Primary care physicians are treating an increasing number of cancer survivors, yet they have no clear guidance on how best to care for such patients. This study considers how primary care physicians perceive their role in delivering care to cancer survivors. (2020-05-12)

Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents and fellows by researchers at Northwestern Medicine and Cleveland Clinic found that no such generational gap exists. (2020-05-05)

Financial incentives boost doctor training in opioid treatment medication
Offering $750 to emergency medicine physicians exponentially increased those trained to prescribe buprenorphine. (2020-05-05)

Nearly one-third of primary care providers do not view medication treatment for opioid use disorder as effective
A new survey of US primary care physicians from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that nearly one-third, 32.9 percent, do not think treating opioid use disorder with medication is any more effective than treatment without medication. (2020-04-29)

Survey finds physicians struggle to communicate positive thyroid cancer prognosis
Despite excellent prognosis with most thyroid cancers, many newly diagnosed patients have cancer-related worry, and physicians vary in their responses to patients' worry, according to new research accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, and publication in a special supplemental section of the Journal of the Endocrine Society. (2020-03-31)

Physician psychotherapy unavailable to 97% of people with urgent mental health need
Publicly funded physician psychotherapy is only available to a fraction of those with urgent mental health needs in Ontario, according to a joint study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and ICES published today in CMAJ Open. (2020-03-11)

Residencies must train residents to treat substance use disorder among pregnant women
Early-career family physicians who both provide maternity care and prescribe buprenorphine -- a medication used to treat opioid use disorder -- primarily completed their training in a small number of residency programs. As data about the risks of maternal mortality from substance use disorder emerges, it will be important to increase training opportunities in family medicine residencies to meet the needs of pregnant women with substance use disorder. (2020-03-09)

Differences between self-identified general practitioners and board-certified family doctors
Physicians who identify as 'general practitioners' are a group distinct from board-certified 'family physicians,' according to a new study that was supported, in part, by the American Board of Family Medicine Foundation. The authors recommend that GPs and FPs be considered separate groups for research, workforce and policy purposes. (2020-03-09)

Dental teams could play an important role in early diagnosis of Type 2 and pre-diabetes
Dental professionals could play a vital role in the diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes as well as identifying those at a high risk of developing the condition, new research by a team at the University of Birmingham's School of Dentistry has found. (2020-03-04)

Social factors play a key role in missed well-child care visits
Despite the benefits of well-child care visits (WCV), up to half of WCVs are missed. A team of researchers and pediatricians at Virginia Commonwealth University, University of Washington, and the University of Vermont sought to understand the challenges that prevent families from attending their child's scheduled appointment. (2020-02-18)

America's largest medical specialty society endorses single-payer Medicare for All
Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP) today welcomed the American College of Physicians' (ACP) endorsement of single-payer Medicare for All. The ACP, a national organization of 159,000 internists, is the largest medical specialty society and second-largest physician group in the US after the American Medical Association (AMA). The historic endorsement coincides with the publication of an open letter signed by more than 2,000 physicians 'prescribing' Medicare for All. (2020-01-20)

Cannabis edibles present novel health risks
With the recent legalization of cannabis edibles in Canada, physicians and the public must be aware of the novel risks of cannabis edibles, argue authors in a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-01-06)

American College of Physicians issues guideline for testosterone treatment in adult men
Physicians should prescribe testosterone for men with age-related low testosterone only to treat sexual dysfunction, the American College of Physicians says in a new evidence-based clinical practice guideline published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-01-06)

Researchers say 30% of patients taking opioids experience adverse drug interactions
A new article outlines common drug-drug interactions that alter how the body metabolizes certain opioids, causing decreased efficacy that ultimately can lead to misuse and overdose. The authors estimate that around 30 percent of patients experience such interactions; however, very few are detected and reported. (2019-12-10)

Major political events linked to mood decline among young US doctors
Major political events, such as the 2016 presidential election and inauguration, were associated with declines in mood among young US physicians, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2019-12-09)

Pot while pregnant: UNLV medicine doctors urge caution
Daily marijuana use during pregnancy may lead to an increased risk of low birth weight, low resistance to infection, decreased oxygen levels and other negative fetal health outcomes, according to a new study from a team of UNLV Medicine doctors. (2019-12-02)

Ontario physicians do not need consent to withhold CPR that they feel will not benefit patients
In August, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice dismissed a malpractice lawsuit filed against two physicians who refused to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to an 88-year-old man with multiple comorbidities and multiorgan failure. This ruling may have important implications for physicians in Ontario and elsewhere, according to a commentary published in this week's CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-11-25)

A national decline in primary care visits associated with more comprehensive visits and electronic follow-up
The number of primary care visits may be declining nationally, but analysis reveals that in-person visits have become more comprehensive and follow-up care has moved online. (2019-11-12)

Associations between burnout and practice organization in family physicians
With the rate of burnout as high as 63% among family physicians, it is important to identify risk factors for physician burnout. The relationship between burnout and personal environmental and organizational risk factors was examined in a study of family physicians. (2019-11-12)

Australia's rural doctors speak up to boost regional health services
A national study has found that longer rural doctor postings and more rural training positions are needed to provide regional areas with the right doctor, at the right time and in the right place. (2019-11-05)

Survey reveals the hidden costs of care cascades
Just about any medical test can turn up an incidental finding that leads to a cascade of follow-up tests. Through a national survey of physicians, investigators from the Brigham have found that 99% of physicians have experienced these cascades of care firsthand and report that such cascades have caused their patients psychological harm, physical harm and financial burden and have caused frustration and anxiety for physicians. (2019-10-29)

Study examines care for knee osteoarthritis in the United States
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research provides an overview of US physicians' recommendations for physical therapy, lifestyle counseling, pain medications for treating knee osteoarthritis. (2019-10-09)

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