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Current Physics News and Events, Physics News Articles.
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Searching for disappeared anti-matter: A successful start to measurements with Belle II
The Belle II detector got off to a successful start in Japan. (2019-03-25)
Bacterial population growth rate linked to how individual cells control their size
Physicists from the University of Pennsylvania have developed a model that describes how individual parameters, like the variability in growth and the timing of cell division, can influence population dynamics in bacteria. (2019-03-25)
Heading towards a tsunami of light
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. (2019-03-19)
Artificial intelligence learns to predict elementary particle signals
Scientists from the Higher School of Economics and Yandex have developed a method that accelerates the simulation of processes at the Large Hadron Collider. (2019-03-14)
Looking back and forward: A decadelong quest for a transformative transistor
Transistors have been miniaturized for the past 50 years, but we've reached the point where they can't continue to be scaled any further. (2019-03-13)
Can artificial intelligence solve the mysteries of quantum physics?
A new study published in Physical Review Letters by Prof. (2019-03-12)
Physicists use supercomputers to solve 50-year-old beta decay puzzle
Beta decay plays an indispensable role in the universe. And for 50 years it has held onto a secret that puzzled nuclear physicists. (2019-03-11)
Spontaneous spin polarization demonstrated in a two-dimensional material
Physicists from the University of Basel have demonstrated spin alignment of free electrons within a two-dimensional material. (2019-03-11)
Light from an exotic crystal semiconductor could lead to better solar cells
Scientists have found a new way to control light emitted by exotic crystal semiconductors, which could lead to more efficient solar cells and other advances in electronics, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Today. (2019-03-06)
Scientists study neutron scattering for researching magnetic materials
Physicists from the University of Luxembourg and their research partners have demonstrated for the first time in a comprehensive study how different magnetic materials can be examined using neutron scattering techniques. (2019-03-05)
Scientists levitate particles with sound to find out how they cluster together
Scientists from the University of Chicago and the University of Bath used sound waves to levitate particles, revealing new insights about how materials cluster together in the absence of gravity -- principles which underlie everything from how molecules assemble to the very early stages of planet formation from space dust. (2019-03-05)
A study by the UC3M researches the limits of topological insulators using sound waves
Research in which the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) is taking part analyses the future of topological insulators using sound waves, meaning materials that behave like acoustic insulators in their interior, but at the same time allow the movement of sound waves at their surface. (2019-03-05)
New hurdle cleared in race toward quantum computing
Researchers have created a new device that allows them to probe the interference of quasiparticles, potentially paving the way for the development of topological qubits. (2019-03-04)
A trap for positrons
For the first time, scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) have succeeded in losslessly guiding positrons, the antiparticles of electrons, into a magnetic field trap. (2019-02-28)
Yale researchers create a 'universal entangler' for new quantum tech
One of the key concepts in quantum physics is entanglement, in which two or more quantum systems become so inextricably linked that their collective state can't be determined by observing each element individually. (2019-02-27)
New dynamic dependency framework may lead to better neural social and tech systems models
In a paper published recently in Nature Physics, researchers present a dynamic dependency framework that can capture interdependent and competitive interactions between dynamic systems which are used to study synchronization and spreading processes in multilayer networks with interacting layers. (2019-02-22)
Superconduction: Why does it have to be so cold?
Currently, there is no precise computation method to describe superconducting materials. (2019-02-20)
Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists
Rutgers and other physicists have discovered an exotic form of electrons that spin like planets and could lead to advances in lighting, solar cells, lasers and electronic displays. (2019-02-18)
Philosophy: What exactly is a black hole?
What is a black hole? In an article that has just appeared in the journal Nature Astronomy, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich philosopher Erik Curiel shows that physicists use different definitions of the concept, depending on their own particular fields of interest. (2019-02-14)
Investigating cell stress for better health -- and better beer
Human beings are not the only ones who suffer from stress -- even microorganisms can be affected. (2019-02-12)
Weyl goes chiral
Quasiparticles that behave like massless fermions, known as Weyl fermions, have been in recent years at the center of a string of exciting findings in condensed matter physics. (2019-02-11)
How bees stay cool on hot summer days
Harvard researchers have developed a framework that explains how bees use environmental signals to collectively cluster and continuously ventilate the hive. (2019-02-08)
Controllable electron flow in quantum wires
A team has found they can turn on and off the flow of current in a bismuth crystal subjected to a high magnetic field, making a new type of controllable quantum wire. (2019-02-06)
Physicists uncover the topological origin of surface electromagnetic waves
In work that provides insights for several areas of wave physics -- Maxwell electromagnetism, topological quantum states, and plasmonics/metamaterials -- scientists showed that the well-known surface electromagnetic waves at interfaces between homogeneous isotropic media, obtained within classical Maxwell's electromagnetism, also have a purely topological origin, similar to quantum topological states. (2019-02-04)
Faster than allowed by quantum computing?
Quantum computers are more powerful than classical computers since they work with coherent ''quantum bits'' instead of ordinary zeroes and ones. (2019-02-01)
International team of physicists continues search for new physics
Researchers thought they might have finally uncovered evidence of new physics, which could be a sign of dark matter particles, but a recent improvement of the measurement by the CMS collaboration produced results that are nearly consistent with the expectations of the standard model. (2019-01-30)
How does a quantum particle see the world?
Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences proved that whether an object (in our example, the ball) shows quantum features depends on the reference frame. (2019-01-30)
The GRE fails to identify students that will graduate and hurts diversity, new study finds
A team of researchers led by RIT Professor Casey Miller discovered that traditional admissions metrics for physics Ph.D. programs such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) do not predict completion and hurt the growth of diversity in physics. (2019-01-29)
Penn physicists find the limits of multitasking in biological networks
Penn physicists have successfully characterized a model that details the limits of multitasking in biological networks. (2019-01-28)
Completing physics Ph.D. does not stem from scoring high on GRE
Scores on graduate school admissions exams like the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) do not predict successful completion of Ph.D.'s in physics, a new study shows. (2019-01-23)
Researchers report breakthrough in ice-repelling materials
Icy weather is blamed for multibillion dollar losses every year in the United States, including delays and damage related to air travel, infrastructure and power generation and transmission facilities. (2019-01-14)
PKU physicists bridge the equilibrium topological phases and non-equilibrium quantum dynamics
The emergent non-equilibrium topological patterns are shown in quench dynamics induced in a broad class of equilibrium topological phases, and provide universal dynamical characterization of such topological states. (2018-12-21)
Electrically charged higgs versus physicists: 1-0 until break
The last missing particle of the Standard Model, the Higgs boson, was discovered in 2012 in the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. (2018-12-20)
Beyond the black hole singularity
Our first glimpses into the physics that exist near the center of a black hole are being made possible using 'loop quantum gravity'--a theory that uses quantum mechanics to extend gravitational physics beyond Einstein's theory of general relativity. (2018-12-20)
Beyond Einstein
Theoretical physicists have been questioning if black hole singularities exist through complex mathematical equations over the past several decades with little success until now. (2018-12-20)
The coming of age of plasma physics
The story of the generation of physicists involved in the development of a sustainable energy source, controlled fusion, using a method called magnetic confinement. (2018-12-19)
Researchers make liquid crystals do the twist
Researchers from the University of Maryland have for the first time measured an effect that was predicted more than 40 years ago, called the Casimir torque. (2018-12-19)
Pressure tuned magnetism paves the way for novel electronic devices
Using very sensitive magnetic probes, an international team of researchers has found surprising evidence that magnetism which emerges at the interfaces between non-magnetic oxide thin layers can be easily tuned by exerting tiny mechanical forces. (2018-12-17)
Advancing the description of 'mysterious' water to improve drug design
Interactions with water dominate how drug molecules bind to targets, but it's tricky to model these interactions, limiting the accuracy of drug design. (2018-12-17)
Ionosphere plasma experiments reviewed in a new Kazan University publication
There are only a few so-called 'heaters' in the world -- special facilities which create artificial plasma processes in the upper atmosphere by heating them. (2018-12-13)
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