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Current Plant species News and Events

Current Plant species News and Events, Plant species News Articles.
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Be prepared: Prioritising invasive species for strategic prevention (Durban, South Africa)
Alien species management in cities can be a difficult and costly endeavour. (2019-06-24)
Plants may be transmitting superbugs to people
Antibiotic-resistant infections are a threat to global public health, food safety and an economic burden. (2019-06-22)
Cities are key to saving monarch butterflies
Monarch butterflies are at risk of disappearing from most of the US, and to save them, we need to plant milkweed for them to lay their eggs on. (2019-06-21)
Plant-based diet leads to Crohn's Disease remission, according to case study
Eating a plant-based diet may be an effective treatment for Crohn's disease, according to a case study published in the journal Nutrients. (2019-06-21)
Coincidence or master plan?
Joint press release by Kiel University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön (MPI-EB). (2019-06-20)
Research details response of sagebrush to 2017 solar eclipse
The short period of darkness caused a significant reduction in photosynthesis and transpiration in the desert shrub, but not quite to the levels of nighttime, according to some of the most detailed research on plant response to solar eclipses ever reported. (2019-06-20)
B chromosome first -- mechanisms behind the drive of B chromosomes uncovered
B chromosomes are supernumerary chromosomes, which often are preferentially inherited and showcase an increased transmission rate. (2019-06-20)
Unexpected culprit -- wetlands as source of methane
Knowing how emissions are created can help reduce them. (2019-06-19)
Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress
When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures. (2019-06-19)
Directed evolution comes to plants
Accelerating plant evolution with CRISPR paves the way for breeders to engineer new crop varieties. (2019-06-19)
Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals
Researchers from the UAB and the IMIM published in Scientific Reports the first evidence in a non-human species, the domestic dog, of a relation between joint hypermobility and excitability: dogs with more joint mobility and flexibility tend to have more anxiety problems. (2019-06-19)
Biochar may boost carbon storage, but benefits to germination and growth appear scant
Biochar may not be the miracle soil additive that many farmers and researchers hoped it to be, according to a new University of Illinois study. (2019-06-19)
Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do
Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do, researchers report. (2019-06-19)
Climate change could affect symbiotic relationships between microorganisms and trees
An international research consortium mapped the global distribution of tree-root symbioses with fungi and bacteria that are vital to forest ecosystems. (2019-06-19)
Investigating coral and algal 'matchmaking' at the cellular level
What factors govern algae's success as 'tenants' of their coral hosts both under optimal conditions and when oceanic temperatures rise? (2019-06-19)
Successful 'alien' bird invasions are location dependent
Whether 'alien' bird species thrive in a new habitat depends more on the environmental conditions than the population size or characteristics of the invading bird species, finds a new UCL-led study. (2019-06-19)
Overlooked: How pumping groundwater impacts streams and vegetation
Pumping groundwater for uses like irrigation has decreased streamflow and plant water availability in the United States, according to the first large-scale simulation of surface water systems' sensitivity to water changes below ground. (2019-06-19)
New research shows importance of climate on spruce beetle flight
If the climate continues warming as predicted, spruce beetle outbreaks in the Rocky Mountains could become more frequent. (2019-06-19)
Methods in belowground botany
Plant root systems play a crucial role in ecosystems, radically impacting everything from nutrient cycling to species composition. (2019-06-18)
A warming Midwest increases likelihood that farmers will need to irrigate
If current climate and crop-improvement trends continue into the future, Midwestern corn growers who today rely on rainfall to water their crops will need to irrigate their fields, a new study finds. (2019-06-18)
Scientists challenge notion of binary sexuality with naming of new plant species
A collaborative team of scientists from the US and Australia has named a new plant species from the remote Outback. (2019-06-18)
Scientists identify plant that flowers in Brazilian savanna one day after fire
Rapid resprouting and flowering of Bulbostylis paradoxa is proof of the Cerrado biome's superb resilience and its capacity to evolve through fire. (2019-06-18)
Egg-sucking sea slug from Florida's Cedar Key named after Muppets creator Jim Henson
Feet from the raw bars and sherbet-colored condominiums of Florida's Cedar Key, researchers discovered a new species of egg-sucking sea slug, a rare outlier in a group famous for being ultra-vegetarians. (2019-06-18)
Researchers lay out plan for managing rivers for climate change
New strategies for river management are needed to maintain water supplies and avoid big crashes in populations of aquatic life, researchers argue in a perspective piece published today in Nature. (2019-06-18)
Climate change threatens commercial fishers from Maine to North Carolina
Most fishing communities from North Carolina to Maine are projected to face declining fishing options unless they adapt to climate change by catching different species or fishing in different areas, according to a study in the journal Nature Climate Change. (2019-06-17)
Biting backfire: Some mosquitoes actually benefit from pesticide application
The common perception that pesticides reduce or eliminate target insect species may not always hold. (2019-06-17)
The complex fate of Antarctic species in the face of a changing climate
Researchers from the University of Plymouth and the British Antarctic Survey have presented support for the theory that marine invertebrates with larger body size are generally more sensitive to reductions in oxygen than smaller animals, and so will be more sensitive to future global climate change. (2019-06-16)
It's not easy being green
Despite how essential plants are for life on Earth, little is known about how parts of plant cells orchestrate growth and greening. (2019-06-14)
Exciting plant vacuoles
Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process. (2019-06-14)
Part of the immune strategy of the strawberry plant is characterized
A University of Cordoba research group classified a gene family responsible for partial control of strawberry defense mechanisms when attacked by common pathogens in crop fields (2019-06-14)
Controlling temperatures for inexpensive plant experiments
Inexpensive, easy-to-use temperature controllers are able to provide reliable set temperatures for the detailed observation of developmental rates in response to different temperature treatments. (2019-06-14)
BTI researchers discover interactions between plant and insect-infecting viruses
Aphids and the plant viruses they transmit cause billions of dollars in crop damage every year. (2019-06-13)
Research shows temperature, glyphosate increase probability for dicamba volatility
New research from the UT Institute of Agriculture suggests spraying dicamba in warm temperatures and adding glyphosate to a dicamba spray mixture could increase dicamba volatility, potentially leading to increased off-target movement and damage to non-tolerant plants. (2019-06-13)
Squid could thrive under climate change
When scientists subjected two-toned pygmy squid and bigfin reef squid to CO2levels projected for the end of the century, they received some surprising results. (2019-06-13)
The surprising reason why some lemurs may be more sensitive to forest loss
Scientists have given us another way to tell which endangered lemurs are most at risk from deforestation -- based on the bacteria that inhabit their guts. (2019-06-13)
Understanding social structure is important to rewilding
Increasing the success of wildlife translocations is critical, given the escalating global threats to wildlife. (2019-06-13)
Climate change benefits for giant petrels
Giant petrels will be 'temporary' winners from the effects of climate change in the Antarctic region -- but males and females will benefit in very different ways, a new study shows. (2019-06-12)
UMBC research decodes plant defense system, with an eye on improving farming and medicine
The plant circadian clock determines when certain defense responses are activated (often timed with peak activity of pests), and compounds used in defense affect the clock. (2019-06-12)
Ancient pots from Chinese tombs reveal early use of cannabis as a drug
Chemical analysis of several wooden braziers recently excavated from tombs in western China provides some of earliest evidence for ritual cannabis smoking, researchers report. (2019-06-12)
The origins of cannabis smoking: Marijuana use in the first millennium BC
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in the Pamir Mountains of western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. (2019-06-12)
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