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Current Plants News and Events

Current Plants News and Events, Plants News Articles.
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Getting fertilizer in the right place at the right rate
In-soil placement of phosphorus can decrease phosphorus loss in snowmelt runoff (2019-04-24)
Tomato, tomat-oh! -- understanding evolution to reduce pesticide use
Although pesticides are a standard part of crop production, Michigan State University researchers believe pesticide use could be reduced by taking cues from wild plants. (2019-04-24)
Early melting of winter snowfall advances the Arctic springtime
Early melting of winter snow is driving the early arrival of spring in parts of the Arctic. (2019-04-24)
Plant signals trigger remarkable bacterial transformation
Cycad plant roots release signals into the soil that triggers the transformation of bacteria into its motile form, helping them move to the plant roots and establish a symbiotic partnership. (2019-04-23)
New chemical tool to block endocytosis in plants identified
Plant cells absorb many important substances through a process called endocytosis. (2019-04-23)
The buzz about bumble bees isn't good
While many scientists are focused on the decline of honey bees, relatively few study bumble bees. (2019-04-23)
New diagnostic tool developed for global menace Xylella fastidiosa increases specificity
In a research article in Plant Disease, Bonants et al. (2019-04-23)
Plants are also stressed out
What will a three-degree-warmer world look like? When experiencing stress or damage from various sources, plants use chloroplast-to-nucleus communication to regulate gene expression and help them cope. (2019-04-19)
Plants and microbes shape global biomes through local underground alliances
Princeton University researchers report that the distribution of forest types worldwide is based on the relationships plant species forged with soil microbes to enhance their uptake of nutrients. (2019-04-17)
Scientists crack the code to regenerate plant tissues
A group of scientists from Tokyo University of Science have discovered a new way to regenerate flowering plant tissues, opening possibilities of mitigating global food shortage problem. (2019-04-16)
To protect stem cells, plants have diverse genetic backup plans
When it comes to stem cell management, all flowering plants work to maintain the same status quo. (2019-04-15)
Knowing how cells grow and divide can lead to more robust and productive plants
In contrast to mammals, where the body plan is final at birth, the formation of new root branches ensures that the root system keeps growing throughout a plant's life. (2019-04-12)
Unique look at combined influence of pollinators and herbivores reveals rapid evolution of floral traits in plants
Pollinating bumblebees and butterflies help plants grow prettier flowers, but harmful herbivores don't, a new study shows. (2019-04-11)
Interplay of pollinators and pests influences plant evolution
Brassica rapa plants pollinated by bumblebees evolve more attractive flowers. (2019-04-11)
How plants defend themselves
Like humans and animals, plants defend themselves against pathogens with the help of their immune system. (2019-04-11)
How severe drought influences ozone pollution
From 2011 to 2015, California experienced its worst drought on record, with a parching combination of high temperatures and low precipitation. (2019-04-10)
Disposable parts of plants mutate more quickly
Mutation rates are proposed to be a pragmatic balance struck between the harmful effects of mutations and the costs of suppressing them; this hypothesis predicts that longer-lived body parts and those that contribute to the next generation should have lower mutation rates than the rest of the organism, but is this the case in nature? (2019-04-09)
Just how much does enhancing photosynthesis improve crop yield?
In the next two decades, crop yields need to increase dramatically to feed the growing global population. (2019-04-08)
Scientists develop methods to validate gene regulation networks
A team of biologists and computer scientists has mapped out a network of interactions for how plant genes coordinate their response to nitrogen, a crucial nutrient and the main component of fertilizer. (2019-04-05)
Radiation and plants: From soil remediation to interplanetary flights
Currently, the study of the effects of ionizing radiation is of great relevance in the context of the challenges in the field of agriculture development, the existence of zones with an elevated natural and man-made radiation background, and the need to develop space biology. (2019-04-05)
Getting to the bottom of the 'boiling crisis'
Researchers from MIT and elsewhere review how a 'boiling crisis' can occur in environments such as nuclear power plants. (2019-04-05)
Science-based guidelines for building a bee-friendly landscape
Many resources encourage homeowners and land care managers to create bee-friendly environments, but most of them include lists of recommended plants rarely backed by science. (2019-04-05)
Novel Hawaiian communities operate similarly to native ecosystems
On the Hawaiian island of Oahu, it is possible to stand in a lush tropical forest that doesn't contain a single native plant. (2019-04-04)
Seed dispersal by invasive birds in Hawaii fills critical ecosystem gap
On the Hawaiian island of O'ahu, where native birds have nearly been replaced by invasive ones, local plants depend almost entirely on invasive birds to disperse their seeds, new research shows. (2019-04-04)
Ready, steady, go: 2 new studies reveal the steps in plant immune receptor activation
Two landmark studies provide unprecedented structural insight into how plant immune receptors are primed -- and then activated -- to provide plants with resistance against microbial pathogens. (2019-04-04)
Nanomaterials give plants 'super' abilities (video)
Science-fiction writers have long envisioned human-machine hybrids that wield extraordinary powers. (2019-04-03)
Insect-deterring sorghum compounds may be eco-friendly pesticide
Compounds produced by sorghum plants to defend against insect feeding could be isolated, synthesized and used as a targeted, nontoxic insect deterrent, according to researchers who studied plant-insect interactions that included field, greenhouse and laboratory components. (2019-04-03)
Fossil fly with an extremely long proboscis sheds light on the insect pollination origin
A long-nosed fly from the Jurassic of Central Asia, reported by Russian paleontologists, provides new evidence that insects have started serving as pollinators long before the emergence of flowering plants. (2019-04-01)
How do species adapt to their surroundings?
Several fish species can change sex as needed. Other species adapt to their surroundings by living long lives -- or by living shorter lives and having lots of offspring. (2019-03-29)
McSteen lab finds a new gene essential for making ears of corn
The new research, which appears in the journal Molecular Plant, extends the growing biological understanding of how different parts of corn plants develop, which is important information for a crop that is a mainstay of the global food supply. (2019-03-29)
Harnessing plant hormones for food security in Africa
Striga is a parasitic plant that threatens the food supply of 300 million people in sub-Saharan Africa. (2019-03-28)
What's in this plant? The best automated system for finding potential drugs
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have developed a new computational mass-spectrometry system for identifying metabolomes -- entire sets of metabolites for different living organisms. (2019-03-28)
Speedier stomata in optogenetically enhanced plants improve growth and conserve water
By introducing an extra ion channel into the stomata of mustard plants, researchers have developed a new a way to speed up the stomatal response in their leaves. (2019-03-28)
Are no-fun fungi keeping fertilizer from plants?
Research explores soil, fungi, phosphorus dynamics. (2019-03-27)
Wastewater reveals the levels of antibiotic resistance in a region
A comparison of seven European countries shows that the amount of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater reflects the prevalence of clinical antibiotic resistance in the region. (2019-03-27)
Rice cultivation: Balance of phosphorus and nitrogen determines growth and yield
Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences CEPLAS at the University of Cologne cooperates with partners from Beijing to develop new basic knowledge on nutrient signalling pathways in rice plants. (2019-03-26)
New tool maps a key food source for grizzly bears: huckleberries
Researchers have developed a new approach to map huckleberry distribution across Glacier National Park that uses publicly available satellite imagery. (2019-03-26)
Venus flytrap 'teeth' form a 'horrid prison' for medium-sized prey
In 'Testing Darwin's Hypothesis about the Wonderful Venus Flytrap: Marginal Spikes Form a 'Horrid Prison' for Moderate-Sized Insect Prey,' Alexander L. (2019-03-26)
Droughts could hit aging power plants hard
Droughts will pose a much larger threat to U.S. power plants with once-through cooling systems than scientists previously suspected, a Duke University study shows. (2019-03-26)
Wagers winter plants make to survive
In a recently published study, UA ecologists have identified the bets that the most successful annual plants place with water resources. (2019-03-25)
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