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Current Plants News and Events, Plants News Articles.
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New study on the immune system of plants: It works differently than expected
What happens at the molecular level when plants defend against invading pathogens? (2019-07-15)
Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators
Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production. (2019-07-12)
Finding of STEMIN (STEM CELL INDUCING FACTOR) for feasible reprogramming in plants
Researchers in Japan found that induction of the transcription factor STEM CELL INDUCING FACTOR 1 (STEMIN1) in leaves directly changes leaf cells into stem cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens. (2019-07-11)
Mystery behind striped barley solved
Albostrians barley is a model plant displaying variegation in form of green-white striping. (2019-07-11)
Oldest completely preserved lily discovered
This is the conclusion of an international team of researchers led by Clement Coiffard, Museum für Naturkunde Berlin. (2019-07-11)
Gene identified that will help develop plants to fight climate change
Hidden underground networks of plant roots snake through the earth foraging for nutrients and water, similar to a worm searching for food. (2019-07-11)
Ancient defense strategy continues to protect plants from pathogens
Plant scientists at the University of Cambridge have discovered a suite of microbe-responsive gene families that date back to early land plant evolution. (2019-07-11)
Mustering a milder mustard
Cruciferous vegetables -- the mustards, broccolis and cabbages of the world -- share a distinct taste. (2019-07-11)
Heat, salt, drought: This barley can withstand the challenges of climate change
A new line of barley achieves good crop yields even under poor environmental conditions. (2019-07-10)
Genetic breakthrough in cereal crops could help improve yields worldwide
A team of Clemson University scientists has achieved a breakthrough in the genetics of senescence in cereal crops with the potential to dramatically impact the future of food security in the era of climate change. (2019-07-10)
Transformed tobacco fields could cuts costs for medical proteins
A new Cornell University-led study describes the first successful rearing of engineered tobacco plants in order to produce medical and industrial proteins outdoors in the field, a necessity for economic viability, so they can be grown at large scales. (2019-07-08)
Grazing animals drove domestication of grain crops
During the Pleistocene, massive herds directed the ecology across much of the globe and caused evolutionary changes in plants. (2019-07-08)
Tracing the roots: Mapping a vegetable family tree for better food
In the new study, a team of multi-institution scientists led by the University of Missouri challenged prior theories of the origins of three vegetables -- canola, rutabaga and Siberian kale -- by mapping the genetic family tree of these leafy greens. (2019-07-08)
Molecular oxygen sensing systems conserved across kingdoms
Researchers have discovered a biochemical oxygen sensing system conserved across biological kingdoms, which allows both plant and animal cells to sense and respond appropriately to changes in oxygen levels -- an ability central to the survival of most forms of life. (2019-07-04)
Plants don't think, they grow: The case against plant consciousness
If a tree falls, and no one's there to hear it, does it feel pain and loneliness? (2019-07-03)
Current pledges to phase out coal power are critically insufficient to slow climate change
The Powering Past Coal Alliance, or PPCA, is a coalition of 30 countries and 22 cities and states, that aims to phase out unabated coal power. (2019-07-01)
'Committed' CO2 emissions jeopardize international climate goals, UCI-led study finds
To meet internationally agreed-upon climate targets, the world's industrial nations will need to retire fossil fuel-burning energy infrastructure ahead of schedule, according to a new study in Nature from the University of California, Irvine and other institutions. (2019-07-01)
Two-degree climate goal attainable without early infrastructure retirement
If power plants, boilers, furnaces, vehicles, and other energy infrastructure is not marked for early retirement, the world will fail to meet the 1.5-degree Celsius climate-stabilizing goal set out by the Paris Agreement, but could still reach the 2-degree Celsius goal, says the latest from the ongoing collaboration between the University of California Irvine's Steven Davis and Carnegie's Ken Caldeira. (2019-07-01)
The chemical language of plants depends on context
Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, studied the ecological function of linalool in Nicotiana attenuata tobacco plants. (2019-07-01)
Scientists discover how plants breathe -- and how humans shaped their 'lungs'
Eperts led by the Institute for Sustainable Food at the University of Sheffield reveal how plants provide a steady flow of air to every cell. (2019-06-27)
Managing the ups and downs of coffee production
Research could bring new coffee varieties to market faster and improve yields. (2019-06-26)
Does limited underground water storage make plants less susceptible to drought?
By tracking water flow through different environments in California, UC Berkeley researchers have discovered a secret to the surprising resilence of Mediterranean plant communities during drought years. (2019-06-24)
Ant farmers boost plant nutrition
Research, led by Dr. Guillaume Chomicki from the Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford, has demonstrated that millions of years of ant agriculture has remodeled plant physiology. (2019-06-24)
Unexpected culprit -- wetlands as source of methane
Knowing how emissions are created can help reduce them. (2019-06-19)
Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress
When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures. (2019-06-19)
Directed evolution comes to plants
Accelerating plant evolution with CRISPR paves the way for breeders to engineer new crop varieties. (2019-06-19)
Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do
Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do, researchers report. (2019-06-19)
A warming Midwest increases likelihood that farmers will need to irrigate
If current climate and crop-improvement trends continue into the future, Midwestern corn growers who today rely on rainfall to water their crops will need to irrigate their fields, a new study finds. (2019-06-18)
It's not easy being green
Despite how essential plants are for life on Earth, little is known about how parts of plant cells orchestrate growth and greening. (2019-06-14)
Exciting plant vacuoles
Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process. (2019-06-14)
Part of the immune strategy of the strawberry plant is characterized
A University of Cordoba research group classified a gene family responsible for partial control of strawberry defense mechanisms when attacked by common pathogens in crop fields (2019-06-14)
UMBC research decodes plant defense system, with an eye on improving farming and medicine
The plant circadian clock determines when certain defense responses are activated (often timed with peak activity of pests), and compounds used in defense affect the clock. (2019-06-12)
Ancient pots from Chinese tombs reveal early use of cannabis as a drug
Chemical analysis of several wooden braziers recently excavated from tombs in western China provides some of earliest evidence for ritual cannabis smoking, researchers report. (2019-06-12)
The origins of cannabis smoking: Marijuana use in the first millennium BC
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in the Pamir Mountains of western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. (2019-06-12)
Foraging for nitrogen
As sessile organisms, plants rely on their ability to adapt the development and growth of their roots in response to changing nutrient conditions. (2019-06-07)
U of G researchers discover meat-eating plant in Ontario, Canada
Pitcher plants growing in wetlands across Canada have long been known to eat creatures -- mostly insects and spiders -- that fall into their bell-shaped leaves and decompose in rainwater collected there. (2019-06-07)
Fertilizer plants emit 100 times more methane than reported
Emissions of methane from the industrial sector have been vastly underestimated, researchers from Cornell University and Environmental Defense Fund have found. (2019-06-06)
Sleep, wake, repeat: How do plants work on different time zones?
Researchers at the Earlham Institute, UK, have developed a new method to reliably measure plant circadian clocks and how different plants respond to day and night, and that these circadian rhythms change as they age. (2019-06-03)
UNH researchers find slowdown in Earth's temps stabilized nature's calendar
According to researchers at the University of New Hampshire, when the rate of the Earth's air temperature slows down for a significant amount of time, so can phenology. (2019-06-03)
Using population genetics, scientists confirm origins of root rot in Michigan ornamentals
Floriculture is an economically important industry in Michigan. The health of these crops is threatened by Pythium ultimum (root rot), a water mold that infects the roots of popular plants. (2019-06-03)
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