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Current Plants News and Events

Current Plants News and Events, Plants News Articles.
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How plants handle stress
Plants get stressed too. Drought or too much salt disrupt their physiology. (2019-11-20)
Melanin-producing Streptomyces are more likely to colonize plants
Recent research published in Phytobiomes Journal demonstrates that melanin-producing Streptomyces are more likely to colonize plants, which has been shown to be protective for many different organisms. (2019-11-20)
Switching to renewable energy could save thousands of lives in Africa
New research from Harvard University and the University of Leicester finds that if Africa chooses a future powered by fossil fuels, nearly 50,000 people could die prematurely each year from fossil fuel emissions by 2030, mostly in South Africa, Nigeria and Malawi. (2019-11-18)
Living bridges
Dense, humid broadleaf forests, monsoon-swollen rivers and deep ravines -- in the Indian state of Meghalaya wooden bridges easily decay or are washed away in floodwaters. (2019-11-18)
Researchers clear the path for 'designer' plants
A team of researchers at the University of Georgia has found a way to identify gene regulatory elements that could help produce 'designer' plants and lead to improvements in food crops at a critical time. (2019-11-18)
Lichens are way younger than scientists thought
Lichens -- a combo of fungus and algae -- can grow on bare rocks, so scientists thought that lichens were some of the first organisms to make their way onto land from the water, changing the planet's atmosphere and paving the way for modern plants. (2019-11-15)
The global distribution of freshwater plants is controlled by catchment characteristics
Unlike land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to CO2 to compensate for the low availability of CO2 in water. (2019-11-15)
Genes borrowed from bacteria allowed plants to move to land
Natural genetic engineering allowed plants to move from water to land, according to a new study by an international group of scientists from Canada, China, France, Germany, and Russia. (2019-11-14)
Catchment geology rules freshwater plant communities
Whether freshwater plant communities use carbon dioxide or bicarbonate for photosynthesis is largely related to the bicarbonate concentration in their local environment, according to a new study, the first global evaluation of bicarbonate use among aquatic plants. (2019-11-14)
ASU study shows some aquatic plants depend on the landscape for photosynthesis
ASU researchers found that not only are freshwater aquatic plants affected by climate, they are also shaped by the surrounding landscape. (2019-11-14)
Seeing past the stigma
Plants of the genus Erythroxylum are mainly known due to their use either in Coca Cola or as the drug cocaine. (2019-11-14)
Climate impact of hydropower varies widely
Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true. (2019-11-13)
Plants might be helping each other more than thought
Contrary to the long-held belief that plants in the natural world are always in competition, new research has found that in harsh environments mature plants help smaller ones -- and thrive as a result. (2019-11-13)
System by which plants have formed secondary buds since ancient times illuminated
A collaborative research group has succeeded in identifying an important transcription factor, GCAM1, which allows liverwort plants to asexually reproduce through creating clonal progenies (vegetative reproduction). (2019-11-13)
Chitin-binding proteins override host plant's resistance to fungal infection
A recent Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions article studies chitin-binding proteins from a soilborne fungus (Verticillium nonalfalfae) that causes vascular wilt in plants. (2019-11-13)
Some hoppy news: Hops don't need to go dormant in order to flower
In a study that wraps up three years and 13 growth cycles of several popular hop varieties, CSU's Bill Bauerle is upending conventional wisdom hop growers have followed for decades to coax their plants to flower. (2019-11-12)
Too much sugar doesn't put the brakes on turbocharged crops
Plants make sugars to form leaves to grow and produce grains and fruits through the process of photosynthesis, but sugar accumulation can also slow down photosynthesis. (2019-11-11)
What's the story, morning glory? Taxonomy, evolution and sweet potatoes
Scientists at the University of Oxford reveal that the sweet potato and its storage root originated at least 2 million years ago -- that is, not only before agriculture but also long before modern humans appeared on Earth. (2019-11-11)
Hot town, springtime in the city: Urbanization delays spring plant growth in warm regions
The first appearance of bright green leaves heralds the start of spring. (2019-11-11)
Earliest evidence of insect-angiosperm pollination found in Cretaceous Burmese amber
Most of our food is from angiosperms, while more than 90% of angiosperms require insect pollination - making this pollination method hugely important. (2019-11-11)
New fossil pushes back physical evidence of insect pollination to 99 million years ago
A study co-led by researchers at Indiana University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has pushed back the first-known physical evidence of insect flower pollination to 99 million years ago, during the mid-Cretaceous period. (2019-11-11)
Researchers highlight progress and challenges of phloem research
A new study by researchers from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) and their collaborators brings this knowledge together. (2019-11-11)
Superfood for Mesozoic herbivores? Emerging data on extreme digestibility of equisetum and implications for young, growing herbivorous sauropods
The long-necked, big bodied sauropod dinosaurs comprise some of the largest terrestrial vertebrates to walk the earth. (2019-11-08)
Introducing GMpi: Affordable and adaptable remote monitoring for plant growth experiments
Growth chambers are essential for plant research, and it's necessary to be able to control and monitor environmental variables. (2019-11-07)
Helping quinoa brave the heat
Scientists identify more efficient methods for evaluating heat tolerance. (2019-11-06)
Study: Actually, potted plants don't improve indoor air quality
Plants can help spruce up a home or office space, but claims about their ability to improve the air quality are vastly overstated, according to research out of Drexel University. (2019-11-06)
Pharmacy in the jungle study reveals indigenous people's choice of medicinal plants
In one of the most diverse studies of the non-random medicinal plants selection by gender, age and exposure to outside influences from working with ecotourism projects, researchers worked with the Kichwa communities of Chichico Rumi and Kamak Maki in the Ecuadorian Amazon. (2019-11-06)
Nature might be better than tech at reducing air pollution
Adding plants and trees to the landscapes near factories and other pollution sources could reduce air pollution by an average of 27 percent, new research suggests. (2019-11-06)
China meets ultra-low emissions in advance of the 2020 goal
Scientists from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science (AMSS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), along with other collaborators, recently revealed that China's coal-fired power plants met ultra-low emission (ULE) standards ahead of schedule and also achieved substantial emission reductions between 2014 and 2017. (2019-11-05)
Scientists studied the reasons for plant extinction in different world regions
A team of Russian researchers from Tyumen State University together with foreign colleagues studied the cases of plant extinction in world biodiversity hotspots and coldspots. (2019-11-05)
The world is getting wetter, yet water may become less available for North America and Eurasia
With climate change, plants of the future will consume more water than in the present day, leading to less water available for people living in North America and Eurasia, according to a Dartmouth-led study in Nature Geoscience The research suggests a drier future despite anticipated precipitation increases for places like the United States and Europe, populous regions already facing water stresses. (2019-11-04)
Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems
A new Colorado State University study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. (2019-10-31)
1,100 plants examined in massive, 9-year genomic diversity study
A new study published in Nature traces the genetic histories of the last billion years of plant life on Earth. (2019-10-31)
Impact of water droplets on leaves quickly triggers stress responses in plants
An international study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden and The University of Western Australia shows that the pressure from water droplets on a leaf surface triggers stress hormones like jasmonic acid. (2019-10-30)
Researchers describe how Vitamin E works in plants under extreme conditions
Vitamin E is a strong antioxidant that could act as a sentinel in plants, sending molecular signs from chloroplast -- a cell organ -- to the nucleus under extreme environmental conditions. (2019-10-30)
Bacterial arsenic efflux genes enabled plants to transport boron efficiently
- Nodulin26-like-intrinsic-proteins (NIPs) are essential for the transport of silicon and boron in plants. (2019-10-30)
Study: Underground fungal relationships key to thriving plants
For a plant to thrive, it needs the help of a friendly fungus -- preferably one that will dig its way deep into the cells of the plant's roots. (2019-10-28)
Game changer: New chemical keeps plants plump
A UC Riverside-led team has created a chemical to help plants hold onto water, which could stem the tide of massive annual crop losses from drought and help farmers grow food despite a changing climate. (2019-10-25)
Daylight not rain most important for Africa 'green-up' phenomenon
Contrary to popular belief, seasonal rains are not the most important factor for starting the growth cycle of plants across Africa. (2019-10-25)
Link established between local action of stress factors and systemic response of higher plants
Recent achievements in the study of long-distance electrical signals in higher plants and the analysis of the relationship between the local action of stressors and the systemic physiological responses were summed up in a review article published in the journal Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology by Associate Professor Vladimir Sukhov and his colleagues from the Biophysics Department of Lobachevsky University. (2019-10-25)
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