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Current Plants News and Events, Plants News Articles.
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Water may be scarce for new power plants in Asia
Climate change and over-tapped waterways could leave developing parts of Asia without enough water to cool power plants in the near future, new research indicates. (2019-09-20)
Why the lettuce mitochondrial genome is like a chopped salad
The genomes of mitochondria are usually depicted as rings or circles. (2019-09-20)
Lighting the path to renewable energy
Professor Mahesh Bandi of Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has co-developed a novel, standardized way of quantifying and comparing these variations in solar power. (2019-09-19)
To grow or to flower: Genes IDed in early land plant descendant also found in modern crops
Since they first arrived on land, plants have likely been using the same genetic tools to regulate whether they grow bigger or reproduce. (2019-09-19)
Grains in the rain
Of the major food crops, only rice is currently able to survive flooding. (2019-09-19)
How nitrogen-fixing bacteria sense iron
New research reveals how nitrogen-fixing bacteria sense iron - an essential but deadly micronutrient. (2019-09-17)
A Matter of concentration
Researchers are studying how proteins regulate the stem cells of plants. (2019-09-17)
Palmer amaranth's molecular secrets reveal troubling potential
Corn, soybean, and cotton farmers shudder at the thought of Palmer amaranth invading their fields. (2019-09-16)
Harnessing tomato jumping genes could help speed-breed drought-resistant crops
Once dismissed as 'junk DNA' that served no purpose, a family of 'jumping genes' found in tomatoes has the potential to accelerate crop breeding for traits such as improved drought resistance. (2019-09-16)
The 'pathobiome' -- a new understanding of disease
Cefas and University of Exeter scientists have presented a novel concept describing the complex microbial interactions that lead to disease in plants, animals and humans. (2019-09-12)
Breeders release new flaxseed cultivar with higher yield
The crop has many uses as plant-based food and fiber. (2019-09-11)
'Planting water' is possible -- against aridity and droughts
Together with scientists from the UK and the US, researchers from the Leibniz- Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have developed a mathematical model that can reflect the complex interplays between vegetation, soil and water regimes. (2019-09-11)
Aphid-stressed pines show different secondary organic aerosol formation
Plants emit gases, called volatile organic compounds (VOCs), that enter the atmosphere, where they can interact with other natural and human-made molecules to form secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). (2019-09-11)
Plant research could benefit wastewater treatment, biofuels and antibiotics
Chinese and Rutgers scientists have discovered how aquatic plants cope with water pollution, a major ecological question that could help boost their use in wastewater treatment, biofuels, antibiotics and other applications. (2019-09-05)
SPEECHLESS, SCREAM and stomata development in plant leaves
A Nagoya University and Washington University-led team of scientists with two disparate sets of expertise -- in plant biology and protein structural chemistry -- have unraveled the atomic basis of how optimal numbers of stomata are made in leaves. (2019-09-05)
Kilauea eruption fosters algae bloom in North Pacific Ocean
USC Dornsife and University of Hawaii researchers get a rare opportunity to study the immediate impact of lava from the Kilauea volcano on the marine environment surrounding the Hawaiian islands. (2019-09-05)
How much carbon the land can stomach with more carbon dioxide in the air
Researchers from 28 institutions in nine countries succeeded in quantifying carbon dioxide fertilization for the past five decades, using simulations from 12 terrestrial ecosystem models and observations from seven field carbon dioxide enrichment experiments. (2019-09-02)
Plant gene discovery could help reduce fertilizer pollution in waterways
Excess phosphorus from fertilized cropland frequently finds its way into nearby rivers and lakes, resulting in a boom of aquatic plant growth, plunging oxygen levels in the water, fish die-offs and other harmful effects. (2019-09-02)
A global assessment of Earth's early anthropogenic transformation
A global archaeological assessment of ancient land use reveals that prehistoric human activity had already substantially transformed the ecology of Earth by 3,000 years ago, even before intensive farming and the domestication of plants and animals. (2019-08-29)
Getting to the root of how plants tolerate too much iron
Salk scientists have found a major genetic regulator of iron tolerance, a gene called GSNOR. (2019-08-29)
What a Virginia wildflower can tell us about climate change
A Virginia wildflower is providing clues to what happens when a plant species adapts to a changing climate. (2019-08-29)
Grassland biodiversity is blowing in the wind
Temperate grasslands are the most endangered but least protected ecosystems on Earth. (2019-08-28)
Mediating the trade-off -- How plants decide between growth or defense
During their daily quest for survival, plants need to strike a careful balance between growth and defence. (2019-08-27)
New biosensor provides insight into the stress behaviour of plants
Researchers have developed a method with which they can further investigate an important messenger substance in plants -- phosphatidic acid. (2019-08-27)
How plants measure their carbon dioxide uptake
Plants face a dilemma in dry conditions: they have to seal themselves off to prevent losing too much water but this also limits their uptake of carbon dioxide. (2019-08-26)
Beaver reintroduction key to solving freshwater biodiversity crisis
Reintroducing beavers to their native habitat is an important step towards solving the freshwater biodiversity crisis, according to experts at the University of Stirling. (2019-08-26)
Monster tumbleweed: Invasive new species is here to stay
A new species of gigantic tumbleweed once predicted to go extinct is not only here to stay -- it's likely to expand its territory. (2019-08-26)
Cell suicide could hold key for brain health and food security
Research into the self-destruction of cells in humans and plants could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative brain diseases and the development of disease-resistant plants. (2019-08-22)
Scientists successfully innoculate, grow crops in salt-damaged soil
A group of researchers may have found a way to reverse falling crop yields caused by increasingly salty farmlands throughout the world. (2019-08-22)
Shocking rate of plant extinctions in South Africa
Over the past 300 years, 79 plants have been confirmed extinct from three of the world's biodiversity hotspots located in South Africa -- the Cape Floristic Region, the Succulent Karoo, and the Maputuland-Pondoland-Albany corridor. (2019-08-22)
Plant protection: Researchers develop new modular vaccination kit
Simple, fast and flexible: it could become significantly easier to vaccinate plants against viruses in future. (2019-08-21)
Plants could remove six years of carbon dioxide emissions -- if we protect them
By analysing 138 experiments, researchers have mapped the potential of today's plants and trees to store extra carbon by the end of the century. (2019-08-20)
Decoding the scent of a plant
A recent study led by Dr. Radhika Venkatesan has identified that herbivores are capable of decoding the scent of a plant and using these cues to brace up their immunity. (2019-08-16)
Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?
Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research led by the University of Bristol. (2019-08-16)
Discovery of a bottleneck relief in photosynthesis may have a major impact on food crops
Scientists have found how to relieve a bottleneck in the process by which plants transform sunlight into food, which may lead to an increase in crop production. (2019-08-16)
Gene variant in maize ancestor could increase yields in today's densely planted fields
From within the genetic diversity of wild teosinte -- the evolutionary ancestor of modern maize -- valuable traits lay hidden. (2019-08-15)
Stressed plants must have iron under control
When land plants' nutrient availability dwindles, they have to respond to this stress. (2019-08-15)
How plants synthesize salicylic acid
The pain-relieving effect of salicylic acid has been known for thousands of years. (2019-08-13)
Where are the bees? Tracking down which flowers they pollinate
Earlham Institute (EI), with the University of East Anglia (UEA), have developed a new method to rapidly identify the sources of bee pollen to understand which flowers are important for bees. (2019-08-08)
Tobacco plant 'stickiness' aids helpful insects, plant health
Researchers show beneficial relationship between 'sticky' tobacco plants and helpful insects that consume tobacco pests. (2019-08-08)
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