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Current Plate tectonics News and Events

Current Plate tectonics News and Events, Plate tectonics News Articles.
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Finally, a way to see molecules 'wobble'
Researchers at the University of Rochester and the Fresnel Institute in France have found a way to visualize those molecules in even greater detail, showing their position and orientation in 3D, and even how they wobble and oscillate. (2020-10-22)
Deep magma facilitates the movement of tectonic plates
A small amount of molten rock located under tectonic plates encourages them to move. (2020-10-21)
Lost and found: UH geologists 'resurrect' missing tectonic plate
A team of geologists at the University of Houston College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics believes they have found the lost plate known as Resurrection in northern Canada by using existing mantle tomography images. (2020-10-20)
New evidence for geologically recent earthquakes near Portland, Oregon metro area
A paleoseismic trench dug across the Gales Creek fault, located about 35 kilometers (roughly 22 miles) west of Portland, Oregon, documents evidence for three surface-rupturing earthquakes that took place about 8,800, 4,200 and 1,000 years ago. (2020-10-20)
Solar-powered system extracts drinkable water from "dry" air
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have significantly boosted the output from a system that can extract drinkable water directly from the air even in dry regions, using heat from the sun or another source. (2020-10-14)
Aerodynamicists reveal link between fish scales and aircraft drag
A new research study conducted by City, University of London's Professor Christoph Bruecker and his team, has revealed that fish scale arrays generate a streaky base flow on the surface of the animal which yields important clues into reducing drag - the aerodynamic force that opposes an aircraft's motion through the air - by more than 25 percent. (2020-10-07)
Seismic data explains continental collision beneath Tibet
New imagery reveals the causes of seismic activity deep beneath the Himalaya region, contributing to an ongoing debate over the continental collision process when two tectonic plates crash into each other. (2020-09-22)
Detaching and uplifting, not bulldozing
ETH researchers have used a computer model to test a new hypothesis about the formation of the Alps while simulating seismic activity in Switzerland. (2020-09-17)
New high-speed test shows how antibiotics combine to kill bacteria
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method to determine - rapidly, easily and cheaply - how effective two antibiotics combined can be in stopping bacterial growth. (2020-09-17)
SwRI scientist searches for stellar phosphorus to find potentially habitable exoplanets
SAN ANTONIO -- Sept. 16, 2020 -- A Southwest Research Institute scientist has identified stellar phosphorus as a probable marker in narrowing the search for life in the cosmos. (2020-09-16)
Turbulence affects aerosols and cloud formation
Turbulent air in the atmosphere affects how cloud droplets form. (2020-09-16)
OBS deep seismic survey uncovered crustal structure mystery of NW sub-basin of the SCS
The formation and evolution history of Northwestern sub-basin has many different opinions due to its own short-period spreading and strong volcanic activities. (2020-09-15)
Japan's geologic history in question after discovery of metamorphic rock microdiamonds
A collaboration of researchers based in Kumamoto University, Japan have discovered microdiamonds in the Nishisonogi metamorphic rock formation in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. (2020-09-04)
Surprise on Mars
NASA's InSight mission provides data from the surface of Mars. (2020-09-04)
A review of ridge subduction, magmatism and metallogenesis
Ridge subduction events are very common and important geodynamic processes in modern oceanic plate tectonics (Figure 1), and play an important role in the generation of arc magmatism, material recycling, growth and evolution of continental crust, deformation and modification of overlying plates and metallogenesis. (2020-08-28)
Study of Asia's hillstream loaches reveals keys to fish family's land-walking abilities
A new genetic and morphological study of South Asia's hillstream loach (Balitoridae) family is shedding new light on the fishes' unusual land-walking capabilities, including that of the family's strangest relative -- Cryptotora thamicola -- a rare, blind cavefish from Thailand with an uncanny ability to walk on land and climb waterfalls using four limbs that move in salamander-like fashion. (2020-08-26)
Novel method of heat conduction could be a game changer for server farms and aircraft
'We are hopeful that the one-way heat transfer of our bridging-droplet diode will enable the smart thermal management of electronics, aircraft, and spacecraft,' said Boreyko. (2020-08-18)
Plate tectonics goes global
A research team led by Dr. WAN Bo from the Institute of Geology and Geophysics (IGG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has revealed that plate tectonics went global 2 billion years ago. (2020-08-05)
Rice researchers use InSight for deep Mars measurements
Using data from NASA's InSight Lander on Mars, Rice University seismologists have made the first direct measurements of three subsurface boundaries from the crust to the core of the red planet. (2020-08-05)
Ancient mountains recorded in Antarctic sandstones reveal potential links to global events
A new analysis of sandstones from Antarctica indicates there may be important links between the generation of mountain belts and major transitions in Earth's atmosphere and oceans. (2020-08-04)
Deep sea microbes dormant for 100 million years are hungry and ready to multiply
In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers reveal that given the right food in the right laboratory conditions, microbes collected from subseafloor sediment as old as 100 million years can revive and multiply, even after laying dormant since large dinosaurs prowled the planet. (2020-07-28)
Laser inversion enables multi-materials 3D printing
Selective laser sintering is one of the most widely used processes in additive manufacturing, but it is limited to printing with a single material at a time. (2020-07-27)
Model links patterns in sediment to rain, uplift and sea level change
In a recent study, researchers from The University of Texas at Austin show that a natural record - sediments packed together at basin margins - offers scientists a powerful tool for understanding the forces that shaped our planet over millions of years, with implications on present day understanding. (2020-07-27)
The Venus 'ring of fire'
ETH researchers used computer simulations to classify the current activity of corona structures on the surface of Venus. (2020-07-21)
Plato was right. Earth is made, on average, of cubes
The ancient philosopher Plato posited the shapes of the building blocks of the universe. (2020-07-20)
A new idea on how Earth's outer shell first broke into tectonic plates
Plate tectonics theory posits that Earth's outer shell is subdivided into plates that move relative to each other, concentrating most activity along the boundaries between plates, yet the scientific community has no firm concept on how plate tectonics got started. (2020-07-19)
Curtin study could rewrite Earth's history
Curtin University-led research has found new evidence to suggest that the Earth's first continents were not formed by subduction in a modern-like plate tectonics environment as previously thought, and instead may have been created by an entirely different process. (2020-07-07)
Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics
In a paper that made the cover of the journal Applied Physics Letters, an international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers. (2020-07-03)
Typhoon changed earthquake patterns
Intensive erosion can temporarily change the earthquake activity (seismicity) of a region significantly. (2020-07-02)
How does our brain fold? Study reveals new genetic insights
Problems with brain folding are linked with neurological conditions like autism, anorexia and schizophrenia, but there are currently no ways to detect, prevent or treat misfolding. (2020-07-01)
New Curtin research uncovers the two 'faces' of the Earth
New Curtin University-led research has uncovered how rocks sourced from the Earth's mantle are linked to the formation and breakup of supercontinents and super oceans over the past 700 million years, suggesting that the Earth is made up of two distinct 'faces'. (2020-06-30)
New research reveals how water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis
In a new study, published in the journal Nature, an international team of scientists provide the first conclusive evidence directly linking deep Earth's water cycle and its expressions with magmatic productivity and earthquake activity. (2020-06-24)
Life in the galaxy: maybe this is as good as it gets?
Researchers have found that rocky exoplanets which formed early in the life of the galaxy seem to have had a greater chance of developing a magnetic field and plate tectonics than planets which formed later. (2020-06-22)
Geologists shed light on the tibetan plateau origin puzzle: an open-and-shut perspective
Earth's geographical surfaces have been formed over millions of years. (2020-06-19)
Quantum rings in the hold of laser light
Ultracold atoms trapped in appropriately prepared optical traps can arrange themselves in surprisingly complex, hitherto unobserved structures, according to scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow. (2020-06-18)
Geoscientists create deeper look at processes below Earth's surface with 3D images
Geoscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas recently used massive amounts of earthquake data and supercomputers to generate high-resolution, 3D images of the dynamic geological processes taking place far below the Earth's surface. (2020-06-17)
Scientists review the metallogenesis and challenges of porphyry copper systems above subduction zone
Porphyry copper ± molybdenum ± gold deposits (PCDs) are the most economically important magmatic-hydrothermal metallogenic system above subduction zones, which have supplied nearly 3/4 of the world's copper, 1/2 of the molybdenum and 1/5 of the gold, as well as large amounts of silver, zinc, tin and tungsten, with however their metallogenesis remaining controversial. (2020-06-15)
Which factors control the height of mountains?
Which forces and mechanisms determine the height of mountains? A group of researchers from Münster and Potsdam has now found a surprising answer: It is not erosion and weathering of rocks that determine the upper limit of mountain massifs, but rather an equilibrium of forces in the Earth's crust. (2020-06-11)
How Dashcams help and hinder forensics
Dashcams are vital for helping police investigate car incidents, however the way the footage is submitted to police, managed and processed can cause problems. (2020-06-11)
Remixed mantle suggests early start of plate tectonics
New Curtin University research on the remixing of Earth's stratified deep interior suggests that global plate tectonic processes, which played a pivotal role in the existence of life on Earth, started to operate at least 3.2 billion years ago. (2020-06-11)
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