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Current Plate tectonics News and Events, Plate tectonics News Articles.
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New discovery could highlight areas where earthquakes are less likely to occur
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered specific conditions that occur along the ocean floor where two tectonic plates are more likely to slowly creep past one another as opposed to drastically slipping and creating catastrophic earthquakes. (2020-06-02)
Yale finds a (much) earlier birth date for tectonic plates
Yale geophysicists reported that Earth's ever-shifting, underground network of tectonic plates was firmly in place more than 4 billion years ago -- at least a billion years earlier than scientists generally thought. (2020-05-27)
New clues to deep earthquake mystery
A new understanding of our planet's deepest earthquakes could help unravel one of the most mysterious geophysical processes on Earth. (2020-05-27)
A thin lensless camera free of noise
Scientists from Tsinghua University in China and MIT in the US report that applying a compressive sensing algorithm can significantly improve the quality of lensless imaging. (2020-05-26)
Caves tell us that Australia's mountains are still growing
Research shows Buchan Caves to be about 3.5 million years old and that Victoria's East Gippsland has remained tectonically active for long times, even into the present-day, which is why residents occasionally report earthquakes. (2020-05-20)
New evidence shows giant meteorite impacts formed parts of the Moon's crust
New research on a rock collected by the Apollo 17 astronauts has revealed evidence for a mineral phase that can only form above 2300 °C. (2020-05-11)
A tale of two kinds of volcanoes
At an idyllic island in the Mediterranean Sea, ocean covers up the site of a vast volcanic explosion from 3200 years ago. (2020-05-09)
Scientists use phononic crystals to make dynamic acoustic tweezers
A research team led by Prof. ZHENG Hairong from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences use phononic crystals to make dynamic acoustic tweezers. (2020-04-30)
Does accelerated subduction precede great earthquakes?
A strange reversal of ground motion preceded two of the largest earthquakes in history. (2020-04-29)
'Wobble' may precede some great earthquakes, study shows
The land masses of Japan shifted from east to west to east again in the months before the strongest earthquake in the country's recorded history, a 2011 magnitude-9 earthquake that killed more than 15,500 people, new research shows. (2020-04-29)
Seismic map of North America reveals geologic clues, earthquake hazards
A new stress map that reveals the forces acting on the planet's crust will contribute to safer energy exploration, updated seismic hazard maps and improved knowledge about the Earth. (2020-04-23)
Evidence for plate tectonics on earth prior to 3.2 billion years ago
New research indicates that plate tectonics may have been well underway on Earth more than 3.2 billion years ago, adding a new dimension to an ongoing debate about exactly when plate tectonics began influencing the early evolution of the planet. (2020-04-22)
Tectonic plates started shifting earlier than previously thought
Scientists examining rocks older than 3 billion years discovered that the Earth's tectonic plates move around today much as they did between 2 and 4 billion years ago. (2020-04-22)
Penn Engineers' 'nanocardboard' flyers could serve as martian atmospheric probes
Penn Engineers are suggesting a new way to explore the sky: tiny aircraft that weigh about as much as a fruit fly and have no moving parts. (2020-04-21)
UCI-led team designs carbon nanostructure stronger than diamonds
Researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions have closed-cell plate-nanolattices that are stronger than diamonds in terms of a ratio of strength to density. (2020-04-13)
What is the origin of water on Earth?
Led by Cédric Gillmann -- Université libre de Bruxelles, ULB, funded by the EoS project ET-HoME, a team of researchers demonstrate that the water we are now enjoying on Earth has been there since its formation. (2020-04-10)
Sediments may control location, magnitude of megaquakes
The world's most powerful earthquakes strike at subduction zones, areas where enormous amounts of stress build up as one tectonic plate dives beneath another. (2020-03-31)
Mystery solved: The origin of the colors in the first color photographs
A palette of colours on a silver plate: that is what the world's first colour photograph looks like. (2020-03-30)
Christmas Island discovery redraws map of life
The world's animal distribution map will need to be redrawn and textbooks updated, after researchers discovered the existence of 'Australian' species on Christmas Island. (2020-03-22)
Composite metal foams take the heat, move closer to widespread applications
Engineering researchers have demonstrated that composite metal foams (CMFs) can pass so-called 'simulated pool fire testing' with flying colors, moving the material closer to use in applications such as packaging and transportation of hazardous materials. (2020-03-19)
Shifts in deep geologic structure may have magnified great 2011 Japan tsunami
Researchers say they have identified the origins of an unusual fault that probably magnified the catastrophic 2011 Japan tsunami. (2020-03-16)
Dinosaur stomping ground in Scotland reveals thriving middle Jurassic ecosystem
During the Middle Jurassic Period, the Isle of Skye in Scotland was home to a thriving community of dinosaurs that stomped across the ancient coastline, according to a study published March 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Paige dePolo and Stephen Brusatte of the University of Edinburgh, Scotland and colleagues. (2020-03-11)
Injection strategies are crucial for geothermal projects
The fear of earthquakes is one of the main reasons for reservations about geothermal energy. (2020-03-10)
Atomic force microscopy: New sensing element for high-speed imaging
With atomic force microscopy, tiny structures can be imaged. But usually there is a trade of: In order to create pictures quickly, very stiff materials have to be used in the microscope, but they can damage delicate structures such as living cells. (2020-03-05)
Zigzag DNA
How the cell organizes DNA into tightly packed chromosomes. Nature publication by Delft University of Technology and EMBL Heidelberg. (2020-03-04)
Early Earth may have been a 'waterworld'
Kevin Costner, eat your heart out. New research shows that the early Earth, home to some of our planet's first lifeforms, may have been a real-life 'waterworld' -- without a continent in sight. (2020-03-02)
Sinking sea mountains make and muffle earthquakes
Subduction zones -- places where one tectonic plate dives beneath another -- are where the world's largest and most damaging earthquakes occur. (2020-03-02)
Actin filaments control the shape of the cell structure that divides plant cells
A Japanese research group using microscopic video analysis provides deeper insight into the mechanics of plant cell division. (2020-02-28)
'Mars quakes': First seismological data help understand the Red Planet's composition
Almost 14 months after the landing of NASA's InSight Mission on Mars, researchers present the first data ever gathered on the Red Planet's seismic activity. (2020-02-26)
Exceptional catapulting jump mechanism in a tiny beetle could be applied in robotic limbs
The fascinating and highly efficient jumping mechanism in flea beetles is described in a new research article in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (2020-02-25)
Deformation of Zealandia, Earth's Hidden continent, linked to forging of the Ring of Fire
Recent seafloor drilling has revealed that the 'hidden continent' of Zealandia -- a region of continental crust twice the size of India submerged beneath the southwest Pacific Ocean -- experienced dramatic elevation changes between about 50 million and 35 million years ago. (2020-02-06)
Peeking at the plumbing of one of the Aleutian's most-active volcanoes
A new approach to analyzing seismic data reveals deep vertical zones of low seismic velocity in the plumbing system underlying Alaska's Cleveland volcano, one of the most-active of the more than 70 Aleutian volcanoes. (2020-02-04)
Upper-plate earthquakes caused uplift along New Zealand's Northern Hikurangi Margin
Earthquakes along a complex series of faults in the upper plate of New Zealand's northern Hikurangi Subduction Margin were responsible for coastal uplift in the region, according to a new evaluation of local marine terraces. (2020-01-28)
Smart materials are becoming smarter
Composites are a new type of materials that consist of heterogeneous components (metals, ceramics, glass, plastic, carbon, etc.) and combine their properties. (2020-01-20)
Slow-motion interplate slip detected in the Nankai Trough near Japan
Japanese researchers used a Global Navigation Satellite System-Acoustic ranging combination technique to detect signals due to slow slip events in the Nankai Trough with seafloor deformations of 5 cm or more and durations on the order of one year. (2020-01-15)
Healthier school meals are evidence of the success of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act
In this editorial, concerns used to support the rollbacks of nutrition standards set forth in the 2010 Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act are analyzed, with researchers finding not only that these concerns are not supported by evidence, but also that the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act had notable positive effects on the dietary quality of meals served to school-aged children. (2020-01-14)
Complete filling of batches of nanopipettes
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Analytical Chemistry an efficient method for filling a batch of nanopipettes with a pore opening below 10 nanometer. (2020-01-08)
Would a deep-Earth water cycle change our understanding of planetary evolution?
Every school child learns about the water cycle -- evaporation, condensation, precipitation, and collection. (2019-12-16)
Breathing new life into the rise of oxygen debate
New research strongly suggests that the distinct 'oxygenation events' that created Earth's breathable atmosphere happened spontaneously, rather than being a consequence of biological or tectonic revolutions. (2019-12-10)
Researchers discover a new, young volcano in the Pacific
Researchers from Tohoku University have discovered a new petit-spot volcano at the oldest section of the Pacific Plate. (2019-12-04)
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