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Current Plate tectonics News and Events

Current Plate tectonics News and Events, Plate tectonics News Articles.
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Operative versus non-operative treatment for 2-part proximal humerus fracture
Although increasingly used, the benefit of surgical treatment of displaced 2-part proximal humerus fractures has not been proven. (2019-07-19)
Scientists discover how and when a subterranean ocean emerged
An international scientific team led by Russian geochemists have established that the huge reserves of water present in the Earth's mantle, which exceed the weight of the World Ocean, emerged over 3.3 billion years ago due to the immersion of seawater-rich oceanic crust into the depth of the Earth's interior. (2019-07-18)
Improving heat recycling with the thermodiffusion effect
In a study recently published in EPJ E, researchers find that the absorption of water vapour within industrial heat recycling devices is directly tied to a physical process known as the thermodiffusion effect. (2019-07-15)
Jump test tool to predict athletic performance
Researchers studying the impact of fatigue on athletic performance have developed prototype software that can enable coaches to predict when elite athletes will be too fatigued to perform at their best. (2019-07-10)
Small-volume, high-throughput organic synthesis
University of Groningen Professor of Drug Design, Alexander Dömling, has devised a method to rapidly synthesize thousands of new molecules and evaluate their properties as potential drugs. (2019-07-09)
Research yields new clues to the origin of Tamu Massif
The discovery of Tamu Massif, a gigantic volcano located about 1,000 miles east of Japan, made big news in 2013 when researchers reported it was the largest single volcano documented on earth, roughly the size of New Mexico. (2019-07-08)
New model suggests lost continents for early Earth
A new radioactivity model of Earth's ancient rocks calls into question current models for the formation of Earth's continental crust, suggesting continents may have risen out of the sea much earlier than previously thought but were destroyed, leaving little trace. (2019-07-01)
UI researchers validate optimum composites structure created with additive manufacturing
Creating objects out of polymers using additive manufacturing techniques is perfect for a prototype, but not for structural materials that require strength or stiffness. (2019-06-27)
Study reveals key factor in Himalayan earthquake rupture
A study led by Prof. BAI Ling from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research (ITP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed that the rupture length of the 2015 MW 7.8 Gorkha earthquake was likely controlled by spatial (both along- and across-strike) variations in the Main Himalayan Thrust. (2019-06-26)
Plate tectonics may have driven 'Cambrian Explosion, study shows
The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist. (2019-06-19)
Zipingpu Reservoir reveals climate-tectonics interplay around 2008 Wenchuan earthquake
A new study led by Prof. JIN Zhangdong from the Institute of Earth Environment (IEE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences provided a new insight on the interplay between climate and tectonics from a sediment record in the Zipingpu Reservoir around the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. (2019-06-18)
Models suggest faults are linked through California's Imperial Valley
New mechanical modeling of a network of active strike-slip faults in California's Imperial Valley suggests the faults are continuously linked, from the southern San Andreas Fault through the Imperial Fault to the Cerro Prieto fault further to the south of the valley. (2019-06-11)
Site of biggest ever meteorite collision in the UK discovered
Scientists believe they have discovered the site of the biggest meteorite impact ever to hit the British Isles. (2019-06-09)
Study provides new insight into origin of Canadian Rockies
The Canadian Rocky Mountains were formed when the North American continent was dragged westward during the closure of an ocean basin off the west coast and collided with a microcontinent over 100 million years ago, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists. (2019-06-06)
Metal foam stops .50 caliber rounds as well as steel -- at less than half the weight
Researchers have demonstrated that vehicle armor using composite metal foam (CMF) can stop ball and armor-piercing .50 caliber rounds as well as conventional steel armor, even though it weighs less than half as much. (2019-06-05)
'Lubricating' sediments were critical in making the continents move
Plate tectonics is a key geological process on Earth, shaping its surface, making it unique among the Solar System's planets. (2019-06-05)
Glacial sediments greased the gears of plate tectonics
According to new research, the transition to plate tectonics started with the help of lubricating sediments, scraped by glaciers from the slopes of Earth's first continents. (2019-06-05)
Scientists find telling early moment that indicates a coming megaquake
Scientists combing through databases of earthquakes since the early 1990s have discovered a possible defining moment 10-15 seconds into an event that could signal a magnitude 7 or larger megaquake. (2019-05-29)
How to interact between mantle and crustal components in the subduction zone?
Subduction process drives the differential evolution of the earth and realizes material cycle and energy exchange. (2019-05-24)
New 3D-printed technology lowers cost of common medical test
A desire for a simpler, cheaper way to do common laboratory tests for medical diagnoses and to avoid 'washing the dishes' led University of Connecticut researchers to develop a new technology that reduces cost and time. (2019-05-22)
How Earth's mantle is like a Jackson Pollock painting
To geologists, the mantle is so much more than that. (2019-05-20)
Helping robots remember: Hyperdimensional computing theory could change the way AI works
A paper by University of Maryland researchers just published in the journal Science Robotics introduces a new way of combining perception and motor commands using the so-called hyperdimensional computing theory, which could fundamentally alter and improve the basic artificial intelligence (AI) task of sensorimotor representation -- how agents like robots translate what they sense into what they do. (2019-05-15)
A surprising experiment opens the path to new particle manipulation methods
A surprising experiment opens the path to new particle manipulation methods. (2019-05-10)
When it comes to planetary habitability, it's what's inside that counts
Which of Earth's features were essential for the origin and sustenance of life? (2019-05-02)
Resolving the 'invisible' gold puzzle
In Carlin-type gold deposits, which make up 75% of the US production, gold does not occur in the form of nuggets or veins, but is hidden -- together with arsenic -- in pyrite, also known as 'fool's gold.' A team of scientists has now shown for the first time that the concentration of gold directly depends on the content of arsenic in the pyrite. (2019-05-01)
Princeton geoscientists find new fallout from 'the collision that changed the world'
When India slammed into Asia, the collision changed the configuration of the continents, the landscape, global climate and more. (2019-04-26)
Diamonds reveal how continents are stabilized, key to Earth's habitability
The longevity of Earth's continents in the face of destructive tectonic activity is an essential geologic backdrop for the emergence of life on our planet. (2019-04-25)
Astronomers find quasars are not nailed to the sky
Until recently, quasars were thought to have essentially fixed positions in the sky. (2019-04-24)
Salish seafloor mapping identifies earthquake and tsunami risks
The central Salish Sea of the Pacific Northwest is bounded by two active fault zones that could trigger rockfalls and slumps of sediment that might lead to tsunamis, according to a presentation at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting. (2019-04-24)
Study: Microbes could influence earth's geological processes as much as volcanoes
By acting as gatekeepers, microbes can affect geological processes that move carbon from the earth's surface into its deep interior, according to a study published in Nature and coauthored by microbiologists at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-04-24)
URI researcher calculates temperature inside moon to help reveal its inner structure
Little is known about the inner structure of the Moon, but a major step forward was made by a URI scientist who conducted experiments that enabled her to determine the temperature at the boundary of the Moon's core and mantle. (2019-04-01)
New technique reduces time-lag between component manufacture and checking precision on CMM
The technique, developed by Dr. Naeem Mian, calculates how long it takes for a component's temperature to be stabilized so that it can safely be measured by a Coordinate Measuring Machine. (2019-03-28)
The solid Earth breathes
The solid Earth breathes as volcanoes ''exhale'' gases like carbon dioxide (CO2) -- which are essential in regulating global climate -- while carbon ultimately from CO2 returns into the deep Earth when oceanic tectonic plates are forced to descend into the mantle at subduction zones. (2019-03-26)
A first glimpse deep beneath an ultraslow-spreading mid-ocean ridge
For the first time ever, researchers have been able to peek deep into the mantle of the Earth under an ultraslow mid-ocean ridge, where they have been able to observe mantle melting and growth of the Earth's crust. (2019-03-22)
Scientists argue for more comprehensive studies of Cascade volcanoes
In a perspective essay published this week in Nature Communications, scientists argue for more 'synthesis' research looking at the big picture of volcanology to complement myriad research efforts looking at single volcanoes. (2019-03-22)
Hundreds of bubble streams link biology, seismology off Washington's coast
The first survey of methane vent sites off Washington's coast finds 1,778 bubble columns, with most located along a north-south band that is in line with a geologic fault. (2019-03-21)
Children grow in a different way, scientists demonstrate
An international group of scientists under the supervision of a staff member of Sechenov University (Russia) and Karolinska Institute (Sweden) found out that earlier views on the mechanisms that provide and regulate skeletal growth were wrong. (2019-03-20)
Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth's ice ages, study finds
Over the last 540 million years, the Earth has weathered three major ice ages -- periods during which global temperatures plummeted, producing extensive ice sheets and glaciers that have stretched beyond the polar caps. (2019-03-14)
Sources and sinks
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. (2019-03-14)
New contributor to age-related hearing loss identified
Researchers have discovered a new potential contributor to age-related hearing loss, a finding that could help doctors identify people at risk and better treat the condition. (2019-03-12)
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