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Current Pleistocene News and Events

Current Pleistocene News and Events, Pleistocene News Articles.
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Microscopic evidence sheds light on the disappearance of the world's largest mammals
Understanding the causes and consequences of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions is increasingly important in a world of growing human populations and climate change. (2019-10-02)
Using past extinctions to drive future conservation
A growing suite of tools is providing fine-grain detail into the historic ranges and population dynamics of large animals. (2019-10-02)
Humankind did not live with a high-carbon dioxide atmosphere until 1965
Humans have never before lived with the high carbon dioxide atmospheric conditions that have become the norm on Earth in the last 60 years, according to a new study that includes a Texas A&M University researcher. (2019-09-25)
What wolves' teeth reveal about their lives
UCLA biologist discovers what wolves' broken teeth reveal about their lives. (2019-09-24)
Anthropologist contributes to major study of large animal extinction
University of Arkansas anthropology assistant professor Amelia Villaseñor contributed a large, multi-institutional study explaining how the human-influenced mass extinction of giant carnivores and herbivores of North America fundamentally changed the biodiversity and landscape of the continent. (2019-09-20)
Denisovan finger bone more closely resembles modern human digits than Neanderthals
Scientists have identified the missing part of a finger bone fragment from the Denisova Cave in southern Siberia, revealing that Denisovans -- an early human population discovered when the original fragment was genetically sequenced in 2010 -- had fingers indistinguishable from modern humans despite being more closely related to Neanderthals. (2019-09-04)
Cooper's Ferry archaeological finds reveal humans arrived more than 16,000 years ago
Archaeological discoveries from the Cooper's Ferry site in western Idaho indicate that humans migrated to and occupied the region by nearly 16,500 years ago. (2019-08-29)
Prehistoric puma poo reveals oldest parasite DNA ever recorded
The oldest parasite DNA ever recorded has been found in the ancient, desiccated feces of a puma. (2019-08-27)
Arctic permafrost melting will aggravate the greenhouse effect
Scientists from Russia and the United States studied the composition of the deep layers of permafrost in Eastern Siberia to better understand the hazards of permafrost thawing to our planet and its inhabitants. (2019-08-27)
Neanderthals commonly suffered from 'swimmer's ear'
Abnormal bony growths in the ear canal were surprisingly common in Neanderthals, according to a study published Aug. (2019-08-14)
Ethiopian rock shelter earliest evidence of high-altitude prehistoric life
Archaeologists have uncovered the earliest evidence of high-altitude prehistoric living in the form of a rock shelter in Ethiopia, though whether the site was inhabited permanently is unclear. (2019-08-08)
Intense look at La Brea Tar Pits explains why we have coyotes, not saber-toothed cats
The most detailed study to date of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits is helping Americans understand why today we're dealing with coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off. (2019-08-05)
Gene transcripts from ancient wolf analyzed after 14,000 years in permafrost
RNA -- the short-lived transcripts of genes -- from the 'Tumat puppy', a wolf of the Pleistocene era has been isolated, and its sequence analyzed in a new study by Oliver Smith of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues publishing on July 30 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. (2019-07-30)
UNM scientists document late Pleistocene/early Holocene Mesoamerican stone tool tradition
In new research published recently in PLOS One titled Linking late Paleoindian stone tool technlogies and populations in North, Central and South America, scientists from The University of NewMexico led a study in Belize to document the very earliest indigenous stone tool tradition in southern Mesoamerica. (2019-07-22)
Fossil of smallest old world monkey species discovered in Kenya
Researchers from the National Museums of Kenya, University of Arkansas, University of Missouri and Duke University have announced the discovery of a tiny monkey that lived in Kenya 4.2 million years ago. (2019-07-15)
Scientists crack origin of the Persian walnut
Prized worldwide for its high-quality wood and rich flavor of delicious nuts, the Persian walnut (Juglans regia) is an important economic crop. (2019-06-04)
Homo sapiens may have had several routes of dispersal across Asia in the Late Pleistocene
Homo sapiens may have had a variety of routes to choose from while dispersing across Asia during the Late Pleistocene Epoch, according to a study released May 29, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Feng Li of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing and colleagues. (2019-05-29)
Humans used northern migration routes to reach eastern Asia
Northern and Central Asia have been neglected in studies of early human migration, with deserts and mountains being considered uncompromising barriers. (2019-05-29)
Climate change affects the genetic diversity of a species
What effects does climate change have on the genetic diversity of living organisms? (2019-05-23)
Tibetan plateau first occupied by middle Pleistocene Denisovans
A joint research team led by CHEN Fahu from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and ZHANG Dongju from the Lanzhou University reported their studies on a human mandible found in Xiahe, on the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau. (2019-05-07)
First hominins on the Tibetan Plateau were Denisovans
So far Denisovans were only known from a small collection of fossil fragments from Denisova Cave in Siberia. (2019-05-01)
Middle Pleistocene human skull reveals variation and continuity in early Asian humans
A team of scientists led by LIU Wu and WU Xiujie from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first ever Middle Pleistocene human skull found in southeastern China, revealing the variation and continuity in early Asian humans. (2019-04-30)
Holy Pleistocene Batman, the answer's in the cave
Examining a 3-meter stack of bat feces has shed light on the landscape of the ancient continent of Sundaland. (2019-04-25)
The Cerrado once connected the Andes with the Atlantic Rainforest
A genetic and computational analysis of birds suggests that the Andean and Atlantic tropical forests, which are now almost a thousand kilometers apart, were connected via the Cerrado in the distant past. (2019-04-17)
Driving a wedge into historic gaps of climate science
Evidence of historic marine life present in Alaskan permafrost is helping scientists reconstruct ancient changes in the ice cover over the Arctic Ocean. (2019-04-11)
Retrieving climate history from the ice
In the context of a major European Union project, experts from 14 institutions in ten European countries have spent three years combing the Antarctic ice, looking for the ideal site to investigate the climate history of the past 1.5 million years. (2019-04-09)
The day the world burned
When UC Santa Barbara geology professor emeritus James Kennett and colleagues set out years ago to examine signs of a major cosmic impact that occurred toward the end of the Pleistocene epoch, little did they know just how far-reaching the projected climatic effect would be. (2019-03-13)
What triggered the 100,000-year Ice Age cycle?
A slowing of ocean circulation in the waters surrounding Antarctica drastically altered the strength and more than doubled the length of global ice ages following the mid-Pleistocene transition, a new study finds. (2019-03-07)
Evidence for human involvement in extinction of megafauna in the late Pleistocene
By re-dating giant ground sloth remains found in the Argentinian Pampas region using more advanced technology, scientists say they have provided evidence that humans hunted and butchered this animal near a swamp during the end of the Pleistocene. (2019-03-06)
Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today
Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. (2019-02-25)
First Neanderthal footprints found in Gibraltar
This work started 10 years ago, when the first dates using the OSL method were obtained. (2019-02-13)
Ancient Mongolian skull is the earliest modern human yet found in the region
A much debated ancient human skull from Mongolia has been dated and genetically analyzed, showing that it is the earliest modern human yet found in the region, according to new research from the University of Oxford. (2019-01-30)
Humans colonized diverse environments in Southeast Asia and Oceania during the Pleistocene
Investigations into what it means to be human have often focused on attempts to uncover the earliest material traces of 'art', 'language', or technological 'complexity'. (2019-01-28)
Neanderthal hunting spears could kill at a distance
Neanderthals have been imagined as the inferior cousins of modern humans, but a new study by archaeologists at UCL reveals for the first time that they produced weaponry advanced enough to kill at a distance. (2019-01-25)
Dental study of juvenile archaic Homo< fossil gives clues about human development
Most aspects of dental development for a juvenile Homo specimen from the Pleistocene fall within the modern human range, according to research by a group of Chinese and international scientists. (2019-01-16)
Ice Age climate caused sediment sourcing 180 in Gulf of Mexico
The onset of the most recent ice age about 2.6 million years ago changed where the western Gulf of Mexico gets its supply of sediments. (2019-01-16)
Did supernovae kill off large ocean animals at dawn of Pleistocene?
The effects of a supernova -- and possibly more than one -- on large ocean life like school-bus-sized Megalodon 2.6 million years ago are detailed in a paper just published in Astrobiology. (2018-12-11)
New archaeological site revises human habitation timeline on Tibetan plateau
Human ancestors first set foot on the interior of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau around 30,000-40,000 years ago, according to new research by scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). (2018-11-29)
Huge crater discovered in Greenland from impact that rocked Northern Hemisphere
A survey of ice in Greenland has uncovered evidence suggesting a kilometer-wide iron asteroid slammed into that island, perhaps as recently as 12,000 years ago during the end of the Pleistocene. (2018-11-14)
The first impact crater found underneath the Greenland ice sheet
A 31-kilometer-wide impact crater underneath about a kilometer of the Hiawatha Glacier's ice is the first of its kind to be discovered in northwest Greenland, scientists report. (2018-11-14)
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