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Current Pleistocene News and Events

Current Pleistocene News and Events, Pleistocene News Articles.
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Scientists crack origin of the Persian walnut
Prized worldwide for its high-quality wood and rich flavor of delicious nuts, the Persian walnut (Juglans regia) is an important economic crop. (2019-06-04)
Homo sapiens may have had several routes of dispersal across Asia in the Late Pleistocene
Homo sapiens may have had a variety of routes to choose from while dispersing across Asia during the Late Pleistocene Epoch, according to a study released May 29, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Feng Li of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing and colleagues. (2019-05-29)
Humans used northern migration routes to reach eastern Asia
Northern and Central Asia have been neglected in studies of early human migration, with deserts and mountains being considered uncompromising barriers. (2019-05-29)
Climate change affects the genetic diversity of a species
What effects does climate change have on the genetic diversity of living organisms? (2019-05-23)
Tibetan plateau first occupied by middle Pleistocene Denisovans
A joint research team led by CHEN Fahu from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and ZHANG Dongju from the Lanzhou University reported their studies on a human mandible found in Xiahe, on the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau. (2019-05-07)
First hominins on the Tibetan Plateau were Denisovans
So far Denisovans were only known from a small collection of fossil fragments from Denisova Cave in Siberia. (2019-05-01)
Middle Pleistocene human skull reveals variation and continuity in early Asian humans
A team of scientists led by LIU Wu and WU Xiujie from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first ever Middle Pleistocene human skull found in southeastern China, revealing the variation and continuity in early Asian humans. (2019-04-30)
Holy Pleistocene Batman, the answer's in the cave
Examining a 3-meter stack of bat feces has shed light on the landscape of the ancient continent of Sundaland. (2019-04-25)
The Cerrado once connected the Andes with the Atlantic Rainforest
A genetic and computational analysis of birds suggests that the Andean and Atlantic tropical forests, which are now almost a thousand kilometers apart, were connected via the Cerrado in the distant past. (2019-04-17)
Driving a wedge into historic gaps of climate science
Evidence of historic marine life present in Alaskan permafrost is helping scientists reconstruct ancient changes in the ice cover over the Arctic Ocean. (2019-04-11)
Retrieving climate history from the ice
In the context of a major European Union project, experts from 14 institutions in ten European countries have spent three years combing the Antarctic ice, looking for the ideal site to investigate the climate history of the past 1.5 million years. (2019-04-09)
The day the world burned
When UC Santa Barbara geology professor emeritus James Kennett and colleagues set out years ago to examine signs of a major cosmic impact that occurred toward the end of the Pleistocene epoch, little did they know just how far-reaching the projected climatic effect would be. (2019-03-13)
What triggered the 100,000-year Ice Age cycle?
A slowing of ocean circulation in the waters surrounding Antarctica drastically altered the strength and more than doubled the length of global ice ages following the mid-Pleistocene transition, a new study finds. (2019-03-07)
Evidence for human involvement in extinction of megafauna in the late Pleistocene
By re-dating giant ground sloth remains found in the Argentinian Pampas region using more advanced technology, scientists say they have provided evidence that humans hunted and butchered this animal near a swamp during the end of the Pleistocene. (2019-03-06)
Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today
Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. (2019-02-25)
First Neanderthal footprints found in Gibraltar
This work started 10 years ago, when the first dates using the OSL method were obtained. (2019-02-13)
Ancient Mongolian skull is the earliest modern human yet found in the region
A much debated ancient human skull from Mongolia has been dated and genetically analyzed, showing that it is the earliest modern human yet found in the region, according to new research from the University of Oxford. (2019-01-30)
Humans colonized diverse environments in Southeast Asia and Oceania during the Pleistocene
Investigations into what it means to be human have often focused on attempts to uncover the earliest material traces of 'art', 'language', or technological 'complexity'. (2019-01-28)
Neanderthal hunting spears could kill at a distance
Neanderthals have been imagined as the inferior cousins of modern humans, but a new study by archaeologists at UCL reveals for the first time that they produced weaponry advanced enough to kill at a distance. (2019-01-25)
Dental study of juvenile archaic Homo< fossil gives clues about human development
Most aspects of dental development for a juvenile Homo specimen from the Pleistocene fall within the modern human range, according to research by a group of Chinese and international scientists. (2019-01-16)
Ice Age climate caused sediment sourcing 180 in Gulf of Mexico
The onset of the most recent ice age about 2.6 million years ago changed where the western Gulf of Mexico gets its supply of sediments. (2019-01-16)
Did supernovae kill off large ocean animals at dawn of Pleistocene?
The effects of a supernova -- and possibly more than one -- on large ocean life like school-bus-sized Megalodon 2.6 million years ago are detailed in a paper just published in Astrobiology. (2018-12-11)
New archaeological site revises human habitation timeline on Tibetan plateau
Human ancestors first set foot on the interior of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau around 30,000-40,000 years ago, according to new research by scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). (2018-11-29)
Huge crater discovered in Greenland from impact that rocked Northern Hemisphere
A survey of ice in Greenland has uncovered evidence suggesting a kilometer-wide iron asteroid slammed into that island, perhaps as recently as 12,000 years ago during the end of the Pleistocene. (2018-11-14)
The first impact crater found underneath the Greenland ice sheet
A 31-kilometer-wide impact crater underneath about a kilometer of the Hiawatha Glacier's ice is the first of its kind to be discovered in northwest Greenland, scientists report. (2018-11-14)
Evidence of outburst flooding indicates plentiful water on early Mars
The presence of water on Mars has been theorized for centuries. (2018-11-03)
Neanderthal-like features in 450,000-year-old fossil teeth from the Italian Peninsula
Fossil teeth from Italy, among the oldest human remains on the Italian Peninsula, show that Neanderthal dental features had evolved by around 450,000 years ago, according to a study published Oct. (2018-10-03)
Teeth of Homo antecessor shed light on trends in Pleistocene hominin dental evolution
Some of the dental features characteristic of Neanderthals were already present in Early Pleistocene Homo antecessor, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Laura Martín-Francés of the University of Bordeaux, France and colleagues. (2018-10-03)
Moderate warming could melt East Antarctic Ice Sheet
Parts of the world's largest ice sheet would melt if Antarctic warming of just 2°C is sustained for millennia, according to international research. (2018-09-19)
Homo sapiens developed a new ecological niche that separated it from other hominins
A review of archaeological and palaeoenvironmental datasets relating to Middle and Late Pleistocene hominin dispersals within and beyond Africa demonstrates unique environmental settings and adaptations for Homo sapiens relative to other hominins. (2018-07-30)
Extinct vegetarian cave bear diet mystery unravelled
Until now, very little is known about the dietary evolution of the cave bear and how it became a vegetarian, as the fossils of the direct ancestor, the Deninger's bear (Ursus deningeri), are extremely scarce. (2018-07-26)
Giant, recently extinct seabird also inhabited Japan
Fossils discovered in Japan show that an extinct seabird called the spectacled cormorant, that was originally thought to be restricted to Bering Island, also resided in Japan nearly 120,000 years ago; indicating that the bird was a relict. (2018-07-11)
Late Pleistocene human mandibles from the Niah Caves may hint at ancient diets
Three human mandibles may provide new insight into the diet of Late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers in Borneo, according to a study published June 6, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Darren Curnoe from the University of New South Wales, Australia, and colleagues. (2018-06-06)
Crafting a human niche
Why it's important to study the deep similarities, and the critical differences, between humans and the apes to seek an anthropological and evolutionary explanation. (2018-05-24)
Humans may have occupied Indonesian site Leang Burung 2 earlier than previously thought
Renewed excavations at the Late Pleistocene Leang Burung 2 rock shelter archaeological site on the island of Sulawesi, Indonesia have revealed new evidence of early human occupation, according to findings by Adam Brumm of Griffith University's Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution, and colleagues from Indonesia's National Research Centre for Archaeology (ARKENAS), published April 11, 2018 in the journal PLOS ONE. (2018-04-11)
Germany was covered by glaciers 450,000 years ago
Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have obtained new chronological data for the timing of the Elsterian and Saalian glacial cycles in central Germany. (2018-03-23)
Studying DNA of ancient humans from Morocco reveals ancestral surprises
After sequencing DNA in bone matter of several 15,000-year-old humans from North Africa, a region critical for understanding human history but one in which it has been challenging to connect genetic dots, researchers report a notable lack of relatedness to ancient Europeans, in their specimens - a finding that rules out hypotheses of gene flow from southern Europe into northern Africa at a particular time. (2018-03-15)
Extinct lakes of the American desert west
The vestiges of lakes long extinct dot the landscape of the American desert west. (2018-02-22)
Shifting shorelines at Lake Tahoe caused by ancient lava dams
Pleistocene basaltic lavas form a small volcanic field that was erupted from seven vents in the northwestern Lake Tahoe basin. (2018-02-13)
New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killers
12,800 years ago, thanks to fragments of a comet, humans saw an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth's land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers, consumed by fires. (2018-02-01)
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