Current Pneumonia News and Events

Current Pneumonia News and Events, Pneumonia News Articles.
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New study explains important cause of fatal influenza
It is largely unknown why influenza infections lead to an increased risk of bacterial pneumonia. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have now described important findings leading to so-called superinfections, which claim many lives around the world every year. The study is published in the journal PNAS, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and can also contribute to research on COVID-19. (2020-11-25)

Fiji's vaccine program reduces childhood death and illness: study
Fiji's national vaccine program against pneumonia, a serious lung condition, and rotavirus, a common disease which causes severe diarrhoea and vomiting, has reduced illness and death, new research shows. (2020-11-25)

T-cell abnormalities in severe COVID-19 cases
There appears to be some kind of T cell abnormality in critically ill COVID-19 patients but specific details are unclear. To shed some light on the problem, researchers performed a genetic analysis of T cells from lung tissue of COVID-19 patients. They found abnormalities that resulted in T cell overreaction that may cause severe pneumonia. The research is expected to lead to new methods for avoiding severe pneumonia caused by coronavirus infections. (2020-11-20)

Just hours of training triples doctor confidence in use of handheld ultrasound devices
Filling a training gap, a Penn Medicine doctor created a geriatric medicine-centered course for point-of-care-ultrasound (POCUS) devices that doubled doctor confidence. (2020-11-17)

Effect of fluvoxamine vs placebo on clinical deterioration in outpatients with symptomatic COVID-19
This randomized trial compares the effects of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with immunomodulatory effects, versus placebo on a composite of dyspnea or pneumonia and oxygen desaturation among adult outpatients with polymerase chain reaction-confirmed mild COVID-19 illness. (2020-11-12)

Mimicking SARS-CoV-2 nasal infection in monkeys
A new rhesus macaque animal model recapitulates the clinical and pathological manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) observed in humans by mimicking natural infection via the nasal route, according to a study published November 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Longding Liu, Qihan Li, Zhanlong He, and colleagues. As noted by the authors, the new animal model could lead to effective treatments or vaccines for COVID-19, which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). (2020-11-12)

Electrical stimulation reduces swallowing problems in patients with neurological conditions
Using electrical stimulation in the throats of patients recovering from conditions such as strokes or head injuries will help to relieve swallowing problems, leading to a quicker recovery time, according to a new study. (2020-11-10)

Many with lupus at high risk for adverse reactions to pneumocystis pneumonia drug
New research shows that adults with systemic lupus erythematosus, who receive trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), a prophylactic therapy to help prevent pneumocystis pneumonia, are at high risk for adverse reactions to the drug, particularly if they are also positive for anti-Smith (anti-Sm) antibodies. Details of the study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Amount of COVID viral RNA detected at hospital admission predicts how patients will fare
A new study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines whether the amount of RNA, or genomic load, of SARS-CoV-2 detected in swab tests of patients being admitted to the hospital with viral pneumonia is associated with more severe COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 is the virus that causes COVID-19. Previous studies on this question have had conflicting results. (2020-10-29)

Genetic analysis system yields new insights into bacterial pneumonia
A team of infectious disease researchers has developed a new method to identify virulence genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia. Using this technique in a mouse model of pneumonia, they were able to gain new insights into the progression of the disease and its interaction with the flu virus. (2020-10-28)

Tocilizumab doesn't ease symptoms or prevent death in moderately ill COVID-19 inpatients
The drug tocilizumab (Actemra) does not reduce the need for breathing assistance with mechanical ventilation or prevent death in moderately ill hospitalized patients with COVID-19, according to a study by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, casts doubt on earlier research suggesting that tocilizumab, which is commonly prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions, might be an effective treatment for patients with worsening cases of COVID-19. (2020-10-21)

Tocilizumab vs standard care on preventing worsening in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia
Researchers in this randomized clinical trial compared the effect of early administration of tocilizumab with standard therapy in preventing clinical worsening in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia. (2020-10-20)

Effect of tocilizumab in adults hospitalized with COVID-19 with moderate or severe pneumonia
This randomized clinical trial assessed whether tocilizumab improves outcomes of patients hospitalized with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 pneumonia compared to usual care. (2020-10-20)

The atomic makeup of M. pneumoniae's 'nap' structure glides into view
Using X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, an international team of scientists unravel the atomic structure of the proteins P1 and P40/P90 which make up the ''Nap'' structure - a protein complex that the bacterium M. pneumoniae uses to attach and move around human cells to cause pneumonia. This will allow us to better understand the ''Nap'' structure and develop medicine and vaccines that stop the bacterium from infecting humans. (2020-10-14)

Study shows similar antibody response to key SARS-CoV-2 'spike' protein in COVID-19
New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that antibody responses to related to the key 'spike' protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus are similar in COVID-19 patients with and without diabetes, boosting hopes that vaccines involving this same protein will have a high chance of being as effective in vulnerable patients with diabetes as they will be in the general population. (2020-10-08)

Users of blood pressure medicine have a lower risk of dying from influenza and pneumonia
Thousands of Danes use ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers against elevated blood pressure or heart problems, and they may have an improved chance of surviving severe influenza or pneumonia infections. This is shown by a study from the Department of Clinical Epidemiology at Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark. (2020-10-02)

People with Parkinson's disease have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19
A new database analysis of approximately 80,000 patients shows that people with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a 30% higher death rate from COVID-19 than people without the neurodegenerative condition. The new analysis of patient data in the TriNetX COVID-19 research network conducted by University of Iowa researchers and published in Movement Disorders suggests that Parkinson's disease is an independent risk factor for dying from COVID-19. (2020-10-01)

TGen and HonorHealth study suggests alternative method of diagnosing lung infection
As ventilator use in hospitals skyrockets during the COVID-19 pandemic, results of a study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute, City of Hope, HonorHealth Research and Innovation Institute, and the University of Arizona suggests a better way to diagnose ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The findings of this study, which was supervised by Patrick Pirrotte, Ph.D., Director of TGen's Collaborative Center for Translational Mass Spectrometry, were published today in the scientific journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. (2020-10-01)

AI can detect COVID-19 in the lungs like a virtual physician, new study shows
A University of Central Florida researcher is part of a new study showing that artificial intelligence can be nearly as accurate as a physician in diagnosing COVID-19 in the lungs. The study, recently published in Nature Communications, shows the new technique can also overcome some of the challenges of current testing. (2020-09-30)

Twin studies suggest impaired type I interferon signaling may contribute to severe COVID-19 symptoms
Two new studies report specific mechanisms of impaired type I interferon (IFN) signaling in some hospitalized patients suffering from severe cases of COVID-19, suggesting that screens for these defects could help identify patients at the highest risk of life-threatening complications from SARS-CoV-2 infection. (2020-09-24)

Scientists Discover Genetic and Immunologic Underpinnings of Some Cases of Severe COVID-19
New findings by scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators help explain why some people with COVID-19 develop severe disease. The findings also may provide the first molecular explanation for why more men than women die from COVID-19. (2020-09-24)

Study on the effect of rosemary and ginger essential oils against Klebsiella pneumoniae
This study aims at investigating the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effect of rosemary and ginger essential oil-based nano-sized formulations on colistin resistant K. pneumonia clinical isolates. (2020-09-21)

Study shows one quarter of hospitalized young patients aged 18-39 years with COVID-19 developed pneumonia
New research to be presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that one quarter of hospitalized younger patients with COVID-19 aged 18-39 years developed pneumonia, underlining the danger the disease represents to young people. (2020-09-17)

Vaccine proves effective against the most severe type of pneumonia
A pneumococcal vaccine was effective at protecting children in Laos against the most severe type of pneumonia, a new study has found. (2020-09-10)

Factors that raise the risk of mortality among children with several acute malnutrition
#AJCN review identifies independent predictors of inpatient mortality among children with severe acute malnutrition: HIV infection, diarrhea, pneumonia, shock, lack of appetite, and low weight-to-height ratio. The authors found that children with a low weight-to-height ratio at hospital admission were at highest risk of mortality. ''Early recognition of these prognostic factors within the community, alongside risk stratification at hospital admission, may help reduce inpatient mortality among children with severe acute malnutrition,'' said author Jonathan Sturgeon. (2020-09-04)

Bronchitis as a child predicts worse lung health in middle age
People who had bronchitis at least once before the age of seven are more likely to develop lung problems in later life, according to new research presented at the 'virtual' European Respiratory Society International Congress. However, the lung diseases they suffer from by the age of 53 were usually asthma and pneumonia rather than chronic bronchitis. (2020-09-03)

Vaccines against respiratory infections linked with less heart failure deaths
Influenza and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with fewer hospital deaths in patients with heart failure. That's the result of a study in nearly 3 million Americans released today at ESC Congress 2020. One out of five individuals will develop heart failure in their lifetime. An estimated 26 million people are affected worldwide. (2020-08-28)

Effect of remdesivir vs standard care on clinical status of patients with moderate COVID-19
This open-label randomized trial compares the effect of remdesivir (5 or 10 days) compared with standard care on clinical status 11 days after treatment initiation among patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection hospitalized with moderate pneumonia. (2020-08-21)

Dilated blood vessels in the lung may explain low oxygen levels in severe cases of COVID-19
A new pilot study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai suggests that COVID-19 is causing significant dilation of the blood vessels of the lung, specifically the capillaries. (2020-08-20)

Experimental COVID-19 vaccine prevents severe disease in mice
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a COVID-19 vaccine candidate from a replicating virus. This experimental vaccine has proven effective at preventing pneumonia in mice. (2020-08-11)

Photodynamic therapy can combat secondary infections in COVID-19 patients
Researchers at the Optics and Photonics Research Center, supported by FAPESP, advocate the technique as an additional treatment for patients with the disease. (2020-08-04)

RSV vaccination of pregnant women could prevent pneumonia in babies
Professor Shabir A. Madhi of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, is the lead author of a study published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday, 30 July 2020. The multinational, multicentre study reports on the first RSV vaccine to provide evidence that inmunisation of pregnant woman could protect young infants under six months old against severe RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). (2020-08-01)

Presenting a SARS-CoV-2 mouse model to study viral responses and vaccine candidates
Researchers who generated a strain of SARS-CoV-2 that can infect mice used it to produce a new mouse model of infection that may help facilitate testing of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics. (2020-07-30)

Flu, pneumonia vaccinations tied to lower risk of Alzheimer's dementia
Flu (influenza) and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research reported at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference® (AAIC®) 2020. (2020-07-27)

Artificial intelligence can help predict the bacteria responsible for pneumonia in emergency rooms
A team of researchers showed that artificial intelligence (AI) could help predict the type of bacteria that caused the infection in patients with pneumonia. The research is presented at ASM Microbe Online, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-07-24)

Using lung X-rays to diagnose COVID-19
This system uses deep learning to train a neural network model that can distinguish between healthy patients, pneumonia patients and COVID-19 patients. This has been achieved using a freely accessible online database that medical professionals from around the world have been feeding with lung X-rays since the onset of the pandemic. (2020-07-21)

No single sign or symptom is sufficient to rule in or rule out community-acquired pneumonia
While the history and physical examination is important, only a few key signs and symptoms significantly change the underlying likelihood of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). (2020-07-21)

Exhaled biomarkers can reveal lung disease
Using specialized nanoparticles, MIT engineers have developed a way to diagnose pneumonia or other lung diseases by analyzing the breath exhaled by the patient. (2020-07-20)

COVID-19: Patients improve after immune-suppressant treatment
Most patients hospitalized with COVID-19 (coronavirus) pneumonia experienced improvement after receiving a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug normally given for rheumatoid arthritis, according to an observational study at Cedars-Sinai. Outcomes for patients who received the drug, tocilizumab, included reduced inflammation, oxygen requirements, blood pressure support and risk of death, compared with published reports of illness and death associated with severely ill COVID-19 patients. (2020-07-15)

Obesity and metabolic syndrome are risk factors for severe influenza, COVID-19
Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of severe disease from viral infection, according to a review of the literature performed by a team of researchers from St. Jude Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, both in Memphis. The research appears this week in the Journal of Virology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-07-15)

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