Current Polar research News and Events

Current Polar research News and Events, Polar research News Articles.
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A long distance connection: polar climate affects trade wind strength in tropics
The impact of sea surface temperature variations in the tropical Pacific on global climate has long been recognized. For instance, the episodic warming of the tropical Pacific during El Niño events causes melt of sea ice in far-reaching parts of the Southern Ocean via its effect on the global atmospheric circulation. A new study, published this week in the journal Science Advances by an international team, demonstrates that the opposite pathway exists as well. (2020-11-20)

Blue whales return to South Georgia after near extinction
An international research team led by UK scientists has revealed the return of critically endangered Antarctic blue whales to the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, 50 years after whaling all but wiped them out. The new study follows recent research that humpback whales are also returning to the region. (2020-11-19)

Well oriented
Polypropylene (PP) is one of the most widely used plastics in the world. By controlling the spatial orientation of the propylene building blocks and additional polar components, it should be possible to create a new generation of attractive, engineered, specialty plastics, with improved wettability or enhanced degradability, based on PP. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Japanese scientists have introduced the basis for a new class of palladium catalysts for such polymerizations. (2020-10-30)

Back to the future of climate
Hot and humid: Using minerals from ancient soils, ETH researchers are reconstructing the climate that prevailed on Earth some 55 million years ago. Their findings will help them to better assess how our climate might look in the future. (2020-10-27)

Researchers provide most detailed and complete record yet of Earth's last magnetic reversal
Earth's magnetic fields typically switch every 200 to 300 millennia. Yet, the planet has remained steady for more than twice that now, with the last magnetic reversal occurring about 773,000 years ago. A team of researchers based in Japan now has a better understanding of the geophysical events leading up to the switch and how Earth has responded since then. (2020-10-21)

Mass loss driven shape evolution model unveils formation of flattened 'snowman' (486958) Arrokoth
An international research team led by Assoc. Prof. ZHAO Yuhui from the Purple Mountain Observatory has built and applied a mass-loss-driven shape evolution model (MONET) and suggested that the current flattened shape of Arrokoth could be of evolutionary origin due to volatile outgassing in a timescale of about 1-100 Myr, which provides a natural explanation for the flattening shape of the body. (2020-10-12)

Arctic weather observations can improve hurricane track forecast accuracy
Comparison of mid-range forecast model accuracy of Atlantic hurricane tracks from 2007 to 2019 revealed that when strong winds associated with upper-level troughs caused hurricanes to move northward, track forecast accuracy was lower. The accuracy of track forecasts in such cases was improved by including data collected over the Arctic Ocean in 2017, by reducing the error in forecasting upper-level troughs. Therefore, additional data collection at high latitudes can improve mid-latitude hurricane track forecasting. (2020-10-08)

Polar ice, atmospheric water vapor biggest drivers of variation among climate models
A Florida State University researcher is part of a team that has found varying projections on global warming trends put forth by climate change scientists can be explained by differing models' predictions regarding ice loss and atmospheric water vapor. (2020-10-07)

Predicting sports performance with "big data"
Smartphones and wearable devices are not simple accessories for athletes. A CNRS researcher has developed a simple mathematical model for studying the performance of endurance athletes. A recent collaboration with a scientist from the Polar Electro Oy company (Finland) made it possible to apply the model to data gathered from approximately 14,000 runners training in real conditions. (2020-10-06)

Interplanetary storm chasing
Harvard researchers create a new 3D model that could explain the formation of a hexagon storm on Saturn -- a hurricane about 20,000 miles in diameter. (2020-10-06)

On the trail of causes of radiation events during space flight
Scientists have made significant progress in understanding the sources of radiation events that could impact human space-flight operations. Relativistic Electron Precipitation (REP) events are instances when high energy electrons move through areas of space at significant fractions of the speed of light. These REP events may pose challenges to human spaceflight, specifically during extravehicular activity (EVA). (2020-10-05)

Climate: Iodic acid influences cloud formation at the North Pole
An international team of scientists from EPFL, the Paul Scherrer Institute and Stockholm University has identified a novel driver of new aerosol particle formation in the Arctic during the summer to fall transition. The authors show that iodic acid is important for forming new particles which subsequently influence the formation of clouds and their radiative effect over the Arctic pack ice. (2020-10-01)

Some polar bears in far north are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice
The small subpopulation of polar bears in Kane Basin were doing better, on average, in recent years than in the 1990s. The bears are experiencing short-term benefits from thinning and shrinking multiyear sea ice that allows more sunlight to reach the ocean surface, which makes the system more ecologically productive. (2020-09-23)

Aberrant electronic and structural alterations in pressure tuned perovskite NaOsO3
In summary, a comprehensive temperature-dependent electrical transport, Raman scattering, synchrotron XRD, and DFT study has been carried out to understand the effect of external pressure on perovskite NaOsO3. (2020-09-18)

Has Earth's oxygen rusted the Moon for billions of years?
To the surprise of many planetary scientists, the oxidized iron mineral hematite has been discovered at high latitudes on the Moon, according to a study led by University of Hawaii researchers. (2020-09-02)

Birds of a feather flock together, but timing depends on typhoons
Six black-naped terns -- a coastal seabird found in the Pacific and Indian Oceans -- have given researchers a glimpse into how they navigate tropical typhoons. The research team based in Japan published their analysis on May 30 in Marine Biology, a Springer journal. (2020-08-24)

Greenland ice sheet shows losses in 2019
The Greenland Ice Sheet recorded a new record loss of mass in 2019. This was the finding of a team of international researchers after evaluating data from satellite observations and modelling data. (2020-08-20)

Equatorial winds ripple down to Antarctica
A CIRES-led team has uncovered a critical connection between winds at Earth's equator and atmospheric waves 6,000 miles away at the South Pole. The team has found, for the first time, evidence of a Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) -- an atmospheric circulation pattern that originates at the equator--at McMurdo, Antarctica. (2020-08-17)

Japanese biologists discover new species of sea worm in the southern ocean
A Japanese research team observed a new species of polychaetes amid the seafloor materials collected near the South Orkney Islands, a remote region of the Southern Ocean about 400 miles northeast of the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. They named it 'Flabelligena Gillet', 2001. (2020-08-12)

Waning attention to climate change amid pandemic could have lasting effects
With COVID-19 dominating the headlines, searches for climate change are on the decline. That worries authors of a new study showing that even brief, involuntary attention to environmental issues moves people to care more and act. (2020-08-05)

Scientists discover new penguin colonies from space
A new study using satellite mapping technology reveals there are nearly 20% more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than was previously thought. The results provide an important benchmark for monitoring the impact of environmental change on the population of this iconic bird. (2020-08-04)

Dome A in Antarctica is the best site for optical astronomical observation on Earth
A research team led by Prof. SHANG Zhaohui from National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) has proved that Dome A in Antarctica is the best site for optical astronomical observation on Earth. (2020-08-03)

A snapshot of melting Arctic sea ice during the summer of 2018
A study appearing July 29 in the journal Heliyon details the changes that occurred in the Arctic in September of 2018, a year when nearly 10 million kilometers of sea ice were lost throughout the summer. Its findings give an overview of how sea ice has receded over the 40 years of the satellite era and show how the summer's extensive decline is linked to global atmospheric processes as far south as the tropics. (2020-07-29)

New technique enables mineral ID of precious Antarctic micrometeorites
The composition of Antarctic micrometeorites and other tiny but precious rocks such as those from space missions--is really hard to analyze without some sample loss. But a new technique should make it easier, cheaper and faster to characterize them while preserving more of the sample. The findings were published on the peer reviewed journal Meteoritics & Planetary Science on May 21. (2020-07-28)

New depth map of the Arctic Ocean
An international team of researchers has published the most detailed submarine map of the Artic Ocean. The study, which counts on the participation of the experts Miquel Canals, José Luis Casamor and David Amblàs, from the Consolidated Research Group on Marine Geosciences of the University of Barcelona, has been published in Nature's journal Scientific Data. (2020-07-27)

Climate change is impacting the spread of invasive animal species
What factors influence the spread of invasive animal species in our oceans? (2020-07-22)

Popular seafood species in sharp decline around the world
The first-ever global study of long-term trends in the population biomass of exploited marine fish and invertebrates for all coastal areas on the planet. (2020-07-21)

Good news: European sea bass absorb virtually no microplastic in their muscle tissue
Laboratory study: AWI researchers gave young European see bass feed laced with microplastic for months, but found virtually no microplastic particles in the fish fillets. (2020-07-20)

Hammer-on technique for atomic vibrations in a crystal
Vibrations of atoms in a crystal of the semiconductor gallium arsenide (GaAs) are impulsively shifted to a higher frequency by an optically excited electric current. The related change in the spatial distribution of charge between gallium and arsenic atoms acts back on their motions via electric interactions. (2020-07-14)

NASA's TESS delivers new insights into an ultrahot world
KELT-9 b is one of the hottest planets known. New measurements from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) have enabled astronomers to greatly improve their understanding of this bizarre world. (2020-06-30)

New compounds from starfish of Kuril basin show efficacy against cancer cells.
Russian scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), G. B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC FEB RAS), and A.V. Zhirmunsky National Scientific Center for Marine Biology (NSCMB FEB RAS) have discovered four new steroid substances which target cells of human breast cancer, and colorectal carcinoma. They were extracted from the starfish Ceramaster patagonicus, a Kuril basin seabed dweller. A related article appears in Marine Drugs. (2020-06-26)

Sledge dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'
Sledge dogs are much older and have adapted to Arctic conditions much earlier than previously thought. In a new study from the QIMMEQ project, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show that ancestors of modern sledge dogs have worked and lived with humans for over 9,500 years. (2020-06-25)

Antarctic penguins happier with less sea ice
Researchers have been surprised to find that Adélie penguins in Antarctica prefer reduced sea-ice conditions, not just a little bit, but a lot. As climate models project rapid reduction of the continent's sea ice over the rest of the century, this iconic polar predator could be a rare global warming winner. Their research findings are published on June 24, 2020 in Science Advances. (2020-06-24)

Satellites have drastically changed how we forecast hurricanes
The powerful hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas on September 8, 1900, killing an estimated 8,000 people and destroying more than 3,600 buildings, took the coastal city by surprise. (2020-06-22)

After a century of searching, scientists find new liquid phase
Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder's Soft Materials Research Center (SMRC) have discovered an elusive phase of matter, first proposed more than 100 years ago and sought after ever since. (2020-06-10)

A tiny arctic shrub reveals secrets of plant growth on Svalbard
It's not easy being a tiny willow on the wind-and snow-blasted islands of the Norwegian territory of Svalbard. It turns out that Salix polaris, the polar willow, handles these tough conditions by growing as best it can in response to July temperatures -- a response that researchers recorded all over the archipelago. (2020-06-05)

Breaking the mold: An unusual choice of material yields incredibly long-lasting batteries
Scientists from the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, develop a novel silica-based cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries, thereby enabling the realization of batteries that can last for over 2000 charge/discharge cycles. The possibility of successfully using the unconventional silica could spark a paradigm shift in rechargeable battery designs. (2020-06-03)

Philippine volcanic eruption could prompt El Niño warming next winter
Climatological models suggest that gases from an erupting Philippine volcano could have significant impact on the global climate if more explosive eruptions occur. (2020-06-02)

Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 meters per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 meters per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found. (2020-05-28)

Designing a flexible material to protect buildings, military personnel
Now, a team of engineers led by Guoliang Huang, a James C. Dowell Professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Missouri College of Engineering, has designed a flexible material that can help buildings withstand multiple waves of energy traveling through a solid material, including the simultaneous forward and backward and side-to-side motions found in earthquakes. (2020-05-26)

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