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The brains of nonpartisans are different from those who register to vote with a party
The brains of people with no political allegiance are different from those who strongly support one party, major new research shows. (2020-08-10)
Indigenous property rights protect the Amazon rainforest
One way to cut back on deforestation in the Amazon rainforest - and help in the global fight against climate change - is to grant more of Brazil's indigenous communities full property rights to tribal lands. (2020-08-10)
Study: Americans prize party loyalty over democratic principles
It is conventional wisdom that Americans cherish democracy -- but a new study by Yale political scientists reports that only a small fraction of U.S. voters are willing to sacrifice their partisan and policy interests to defend democratic principles. (2020-08-10)
New model shows how voting behavior can drive political parties apart
If voters gravitate toward the center of the political spectrum, why are the parties drifting farther apart? (2020-08-10)
Journalists' Twitter use shows them talking within smaller bubbles
Journalists in Washington, D.C., have long been accused of living in a ''Beltway bubble.'' Their interactions on Twitter, however, show them congregating in even smaller ''microbubbles,'' says a recent study. (2020-08-05)
Sharing a secret...the quantum way
Researchers at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, have demonstrated a record setting quantum protocol for sharing a secret amongst many parties. (2020-07-31)
A rebranding of 'freedom'?
According to recent Gallup polls, socialism is now more popular than capitalism among Democrats and young people, and support for ''some form of socialism'' among all Americans is at 43% (compared to 25% in 1942). (2020-07-31)
The need for progressive national narratives
The recent rise of authoritarian nationalist movements has reinforced the tendency of many on the left, and some on the right, to reject all forms of nationalism, writes Rogers M. (2020-07-31)
New survey finds large racial divide in concern over ability to pay for COVID-19 treatment
People of color are far more likely to worry about their ability to pay for healthcare if diagnosed with COVID-19 than their White counterparts, according to a new survey from nonprofit West Health and Gallup. (2020-07-29)
Supportive communities and progressive politics can reduce suicide risk among LGBTQ girls
Many LGBTQ youth continue to experience stigma and discrimination despite Canada's progress in protecting human rights. (2020-07-28)
NZ-China agreement has brought strong economic gains, Otago research
An Otago economist argues New Zealand should expand its trade agreements in the wake of COVID-19, as his new research shows the country benefited from the NZ-China free trade agreement. (2020-07-28)
Men are more likely than women to endorse COVID-19 conspiracy theories
A new study found men are more likely than women to endorse conspiracy theories connected to COVID-19. (2020-07-27)
Machine learning system can detect foreign social media influence campaigns using content alone
Researchers have developed an automated machine learning system they say can detect social media posts involved in coordinated political influence campaigns -- such as Russia's alleged efforts to sway the results of the 2016 elections in the United States -- regardless of platform and based only on the content of the posts. (2020-07-22)
Chinese, American scientists leading efforts on COVID-19
Despite the political tensions between the United States and China, scientists in the two countries are working together more than ever to study the COVID-19 virus, a new study suggests. (2020-07-21)
How governments resist World Heritage 'in Danger' listings
Some national governments repeatedly resist the placement of 41 UNESCO World Heritage sites on the World Heritage in Danger list. (2020-07-20)
Changes in farming urgent to rescue biodiversity
Humans depend on farming for their survival but this activity takes up more than one-third of the world's landmass and endangers 62% of all threatened species. (2020-07-20)
A call to arms: Enlisting private land owners in conservation
In 1872 the United States created Yellowstone, the first National Park in the world. (2020-07-17)
Extinction Rebellion's activists more likely to be new to protesting, study shows
Extinction Rebellion supporters are more likely to be new to protesting than other environmental activists, a new study shows. (2020-07-15)
Do campaign finance reforms truly help make elections more competitive?
A new study by two social scientists at the University of Missouri finds state campaign finance reforms actually have no beneficial effect on the competitiveness of state legislative elections. (2020-07-15)
Colleges that emphasize activism have more civically engaged students
Students tend to be more engaged in activism if the school that they attend emphasizes social and political issues, according to new research featuring faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-07-07)
Study: Crowdsourced data could help map urban food deserts
New research from The University of Texas at Dallas suggests food deserts might be more prevalent in the U.S. than the numbers reported in government estimates. (2020-07-02)
To support lactating emergency physicians, consider these strategies
A new paper highlights strategies that emergency departments can implement to support lactating emergency physicians. (2020-06-30)
Coronavirus: Social distancing accepted when people understand exponential growth
Experiments among U.S. population show: When people fail to see the need for restrictions on public life, explaining the exponential increase of infections creates greater acceptance for measures taken to slow down the infection rate. (2020-06-29)
A new theory about political polarization
A new model of opinion formation shows how the extent to which people like or dislike each other affects their political views -- and vice versa. (2020-06-29)
New pharmaceuticals: public research combines efficiency with contained costs
Is the basic research that goes into the development of new drugs more efficiently conducted by public-sector scientists, pharmaceutical firms, or independent private laboratories? (2020-06-29)
No keys to the kingdom: New single sign-on algorithm provides superior privacy
Single sign-on systems (SSOs) allow us to login to multiple websites and applications using a single username and password combination. (2020-06-29)
The price of taking a stance: How corporate sociopolitical activism impacts bottom line
More businesses are taking a stand on controversial sociopolitical issues, and new research out of the University of Arizona sheds light on how those stances can impact the bottom line. (2020-06-29)
We feel connected when we move together in time with music
Go dancing! A new study conduted at Center for Music in the Brain at Aarhus University, Denmark, suggest that then moving together with music, synchronous movements between individuals increase social closeness. (2020-06-26)
America's political future will be shaped by aging, journal indicates
The latest issue of the journal Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR) from The Gerontological Society of America shows how aging is reshaping politics today in unprecedented ways, and how it will continue to do so for years to come. (2020-06-25)
Twitter posts reveal polarization in Congress on COVID-19
The rapid politicization of the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen in messages members of the US Congress sent about the issue on the social media site Twitter, a new analysis found. (2020-06-24)
Polarized tweets reveal deep divisions in congressional COVID-19 messaging
An analysis of COVID-19-related tweets issued by members of Congress from January 17 through March 31, 2020 finds that Democrats and Republicans quickly polarized along party lines in their messaging about the virus on Twitter. (2020-06-24)
Positive YouTube videos of wolves linked to greater tolerance
A new study from North Carolina State University suggests that people have more tolerance for wolves after seeing positive videos about them, which could make YouTube an important wolf conservation tool. (2020-06-22)
'Game changer' for reporters: 2016 US presidential election coverage
The 2016 US presidential election is considered a 'game changer' for journalists covering the US presidential elections by causing them to dramatically reconsider how they view their role -- either as neutral disseminators of information or impassioned advocates for the truth -- according to researchers at the University of Missouri's School of Journalism. (2020-06-22)
Overconsumption and growth economy key drivers of environmental crises
If we want to mitigate and solve the many global environmental issues the world is facing, we can't rely on technology alone, scientists have warned. (2020-06-19)
"Fake news" lowers trust in mainstream media across party lines, study finds
A Rutgers-led study finds that online misinformation, or ''fake news,'' lowers people's trust in mainstream media across party lines. (2020-06-18)
Report finds that unionist and nationalist identities in NI became stronger in the run-up to Brexit
A research study on political attitudes and identities in Northern Ireland has been released today (Wednesday 17 June) by ARK -- a joint initiative between Queen's University Belfast and Ulster University. (2020-06-16)
Candidates who use humor on Twitter may find the joke is on them
Political candidates' use of humor on social media could sometimes backfire on them with potential supporters, new research suggests. (2020-06-15)
Political 'oil spill': Polarization is growing stronger and getting stickier
Experts have documented that political polarization is intensifying in the United States. (2020-06-11)
Opposition to sexual- and gender-minority rights linked to support for Christian dominance
Many Christian and political conservatives in the U.S. support legislation to deny sexual and gender minorities the rights most Americans enjoy: unfettered access to jobs, housing, services and public facilities; the opportunity to marry as they choose; and the right to adopt a child. (2020-06-11)
Government health, safety regulations backfire with conservatives, study shows
A new study from the University of Notre Dame shows government-imposed restrictions can backfire, depending on political ideology. (2020-06-10)
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