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Current Pollen News and Events

Current Pollen News and Events, Pollen News Articles.
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Earliest evidence of insect-angiosperm pollination found in Cretaceous Burmese amber
Most of our food is from angiosperms, while more than 90% of angiosperms require insect pollination - making this pollination method hugely important. (2019-11-11)
New fossil pushes back physical evidence of insect pollination to 99 million years ago
A study co-led by researchers at Indiana University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has pushed back the first-known physical evidence of insect flower pollination to 99 million years ago, during the mid-Cretaceous period. (2019-11-11)
Allergy shots may be an effective treatment for pediatric pollen food allergy syndrome
A new study being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting in Houston shows allergy shots (subcutaneous immunotherapy) can be effective in reducing PFAS symptoms for pediatric patients. (2019-11-08)
Preserved pollen tells the history of floodplains
Fossil pollen can help reconstruct the past and predict the future. (2019-10-30)
Human activities boosted global soil erosion already 4,000 years ago
Soil erosion reduces the productivity of ecosystems, it changes nutrient cycles and it thus directly impacts climate and society. (2019-10-29)
Mutated ferns shed light on ancient mass extinction
At the end of the Triassic around 201 million years ago, three out of four species on Earth disappeared. (2019-10-28)
Deflating beach balls and drug delivery
Gwennou Coupier and his colleagues at Grenoble Alps University, Grenoble, France have shown that macroscopic-level models of the properties of microscopic hollow spheres agree very well with theoretical predictions. (2019-10-25)
Information theory as a forensics tool for investigating climate mysteries
During Earth's last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly. (2019-10-16)
Biologists track the invasion of herbicide-resistant weeds into southwestern Ontario
A team led by biologists from the University of Toronto have identified the ways in which herbicide-resistant strains of the invasive common waterhemp weed have emerged in fields of soy and corn in southwestern Ontario. (2019-09-30)
Swapping pollinators reduces species diversity, study finds
In a new paper published in Evolution Letters, Carolyn Wessinger and Lena Hileman demonstrate that abandoning one pollinator for another to realize immediate benefits could compromise a flower's long-term survival. (2019-09-10)
Researchers determine pollen abundance and diversity in pollinator-dependent crops
A new study provides valuable insights into pollen abundance and diversity available to honeybee colonies employed in five major pollinator-dependent crops in Oregon and California. (2019-08-30)
Computational approach speeds up advanced microscopy imaging
Researchers have developed a way to enhance the imaging speed of two-photon microscopy up to 5 times without compromising resolution. (2019-08-27)
Wild ground-nesting bees might be exposed to lethal levels of neonics in soil
In a first-ever study investigating the risk of neonicotinoid insecticides to ground-nesting bees, University of Guelph researchers have discovered hoary squash bees are being exposed to lethal levels of the chemicals in the soil. (2019-08-26)
Japanese trees synchronize allergic pollen release over immense distances
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) researchers used tree pollen data for 120 sites across Japan to observe pollen synchronicity at regional and national levels. (2019-08-26)
Cleaning pollutants from water with pollen and spores -- without the 'achoo!' (video)
In addition to their role in plant fertilization and reproduction, pollens and spores have another, hidden talent: With a simple treatment, these cheap, abundant and renewable grains can be converted into tiny sponge-like particles that can be used to grab onto pollutants and remove them from water, scientists report. (2019-08-26)
The journey of the pollen
When insects carry the pollen from one flower to another to pollinate them, the pollen must attach to and detach from different surfaces. (2019-08-20)
Microplastic drifting down with the snow
Over the past several years, microplastic particles have repeatedly been detected in sea-water, drinking water, and even in animals. (2019-08-14)
Where are the bees? Tracking down which flowers they pollinate
Earlham Institute (EI), with the University of East Anglia (UEA), have developed a new method to rapidly identify the sources of bee pollen to understand which flowers are important for bees. (2019-08-08)
Fighting a mighty weed
Weeds are pesky in any situation. Now, imagine a weed so troublesome that it has mutated to resist multiple herbicides. (2019-08-07)
Quantum dots capture speciation in sandplain fynbos on the West Coast of South Africa
With a tongue up to 7 cm long, the long-tongue fly Moegistorhynchus longirostris often battle to fly, especially in the wind. (2019-08-05)
Plant probe could help estimate bee exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides
Bee populations are declining, and neonicotinoid pesticides continue to be investigated -- and in some cases banned -- because of their suspected role as a contributing factor. (2019-07-17)
Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators
Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production. (2019-07-12)
Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance
A team of researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the University of La Rochelle is now the first to have demonstrated that organic farming benefits honeybee colonies, especially when food is scarce in late spring. (2019-06-26)
B chromosome first -- mechanisms behind the drive of B chromosomes uncovered
B chromosomes are supernumerary chromosomes, which often are preferentially inherited and showcase an increased transmission rate. (2019-06-20)
Flickering sky islands generate andean biodiversity
As the climate changed over the past million years, areas of paramo around Andean peaks in Colombia grew and contracted, giving rise to species unique to this habitat. (2019-06-14)
Pollen collected by US honey bees in urban settings shows dramatic seasonal variation
The diversity and availability of pollen foraged by honey bees across urban and suburban areas in the US varies drastically with the seasons, according to a study published June 12, 2019 in PLOS ONE by Juliana Rangel from Texas A&M University, USA, and colleagues. (2019-06-12)
Pollen allergies occur more frequently in anxiety sufferers
Seasonal allergies to different types of grass or tree pollen are more common in people with anxiety disorders, while patients with depression are more likely to suffer from perennial allergies triggered by allergens such as animal hair. (2019-05-28)
How corn's ancient ancestor swipes left on crossbreeding
Determining how one species becomes distinct from another has been a subject of fascination dating back to Charles Darwin. (2019-05-24)
Eastern forests shaped more by Native Americans' burning than climate change
Native Americans' use of fire to manage vegetation in what is now the Eastern United States was more profound than previously believed, according to a Penn State researcher who determined that forest composition change in the region was caused more by land use than climate change. (2019-05-21)
As bumblebee diets narrow, ours could too
A new study from the University of California, Riverside, reveals the loss of plant diversity harms the humble bumble at a critical stage in its development from egg to adult. (2019-05-15)
Close relatives can coexist: two flower species show us how
Scientists have discovered how two closely-related species of Asiatic dayflower can coexist in the wild despite their competitive relationship. (2019-05-07)
The hunger gaps: How flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. (2019-05-01)
With flower preferences, bees have a big gap between the sexes
For scores of wild bee species, females and males visit very different flowers for food -- a discovery that could be important for conservation efforts, according to Rutgers-led research. (2019-04-24)
New key stages discovered in how plants prepare to make sex cells for reproduction
Scientists at Stanford have built a detailed timeline of the gene activity leading up to meiosis in corn, a finding with potential implications for plant breeding as well as sexually reproductive organisms more broadly. (2019-04-24)
Field trial with neonicotinoids: Honeybees are much more robust than bumblebees
The insecticide clothianidin affects different species of bees in different ways. (2019-04-23)
The buzz about bumble bees isn't good
While many scientists are focused on the decline of honey bees, relatively few study bumble bees. (2019-04-23)
Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn
Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn, according to Rutgers-led research that helps explain the genetic instability in certain strains and may lead to better breeding of corn and other crops. (2019-04-15)
New research reveals climate change secrets hidden in the Yukon permafrost
A study from U of T Mississauga uses new research techniques to reveal alarming information about climate change in Canada's north. (2019-04-10)
Identifying the grass pollen that gets up your nose
Scientists could be a step closer to providing more precise pollen forecasts to people who live with asthma or hay fever. (2019-04-08)
Pollen detectives work to predict asthma and hay fever
The presence of different strains of grass pollen in the atmosphere can help predict when hay fever and asthma could strike, a study involving a University of Queensland researcher has found. (2019-04-08)
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