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Current Pollen News and Events, Pollen News Articles.
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Pollen-based 'paper' holds promise for new generation of natural components
NTU Singapore scientists have created a paper-like material derived from pollen that bends and curls in response to changing levels of environmental humidity. (2020-04-06)
Traces of ancient rainforest in Antarctica point to a warmer prehistoric world
Researchers have found evidence of rainforests near the South Pole 90 million years ago, suggesting the climate was exceptionally warm at the time. (2020-04-01)
New discovery: Evidence for a 90-million-year-old rainforest near the South Pole
Researchers have found unexpected fossil traces of a temperate rainforest near the South Pole 90 million years ago, suggesting the continent had an exceptionally warm climate in prehistoric times. (2020-04-01)
NTU scientists transform ultra-tough pollen into flexible material
Scientists at NTU Singapore have found a way to turn pollen, one of the hardest materials in the plant kingdom, into a soft and flexible material, with the potential to serve as 'building blocks' for the design of new categories of eco-friendly materials. (2020-03-19)
Beetles changed their diet during the Cretaceous period
Like a snapshot, amber preserves bygone worlds. An international team of paleontologists from the University of Bonn has now described four new beetle species in fossilized tree resin from Myanmar, which belong to the Kateretidae family. (2020-03-18)
New details revealed on how plants maintain optimal sperm-egg ratio
Molecular biologist Alice Cheung and colleagues at UMass Amherst used powerful new molecular biochemistry, microscopy and genetic techniques to solve, in unprecedented detail, the mechanisms of how flowering plants avoid polyspermy. (2020-03-18)
Bumblebees aversion to pumpkin pollen may help plants thrive
Cornell University researchers have found that squash and pumpkin pollen have physical, nutritional and chemical defense qualities that are harmful to bumblebees. (2020-03-11)
How quickly do flower strips in cities help the local bees?
Many cities are introducing green areas to protect their fauna. (2020-03-02)
Researchers make asthma breakthrough
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have made a breakthrough that may eventually lead to improved therapeutic options for people living with asthma. (2020-02-26)
Discovery at 'flower burial' site could unravel mystery of Neanderthal death rites
* First articulated Neanderthal skeleton to be found in over 20 years. (2020-02-18)
Fossilized insect from 100 million years ago is oldest record of primitive bee with pollen
Beetle parasites clinging to a primitive bee 100 million years ago may have caused the flight error that, while deadly for the insect, is a boon for science today. (2020-02-12)
Bumble bees prefer a low-fat diet
Are bees dying of malnourishment? Professor Sara Diana Leonhardt examines the interactions between plants and insects with her work group at the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan. (2020-02-05)
Understanding the mechanisms of seemingly chaotic synchronization in trees
The synchronization of seed production by trees has garnered attention due to its importance in agriculture, forestry and ecosystem management. (2019-12-19)
When flowers reached Australia
University of Melbourne research has established when and where flowering plants first took a foothold. (2019-12-12)
Justinianic plague not a landmark pandemic?
A study of diverse datasets, including pollen, coinage, and funeral practices, reveals that the effects of the late antique plague pandemic commonly known as the Justinianic Plague may have been overestimated. (2019-12-02)
Conservation of biodiversity is like an insurance policy for the future of mankind
Fens and bogs are valuable research environments for paleoecologists due to ancient fossils that have survived in the peatland for thousands of years. (2019-11-26)
Earliest evidence of insect-angiosperm pollination found in Cretaceous Burmese amber
Most of our food is from angiosperms, while more than 90% of angiosperms require insect pollination - making this pollination method hugely important. (2019-11-11)
New fossil pushes back physical evidence of insect pollination to 99 million years ago
A study co-led by researchers at Indiana University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has pushed back the first-known physical evidence of insect flower pollination to 99 million years ago, during the mid-Cretaceous period. (2019-11-11)
Allergy shots may be an effective treatment for pediatric pollen food allergy syndrome
A new study being presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting in Houston shows allergy shots (subcutaneous immunotherapy) can be effective in reducing PFAS symptoms for pediatric patients. (2019-11-08)
Preserved pollen tells the history of floodplains
Fossil pollen can help reconstruct the past and predict the future. (2019-10-30)
Human activities boosted global soil erosion already 4,000 years ago
Soil erosion reduces the productivity of ecosystems, it changes nutrient cycles and it thus directly impacts climate and society. (2019-10-29)
Mutated ferns shed light on ancient mass extinction
At the end of the Triassic around 201 million years ago, three out of four species on Earth disappeared. (2019-10-28)
Deflating beach balls and drug delivery
Gwennou Coupier and his colleagues at Grenoble Alps University, Grenoble, France have shown that macroscopic-level models of the properties of microscopic hollow spheres agree very well with theoretical predictions. (2019-10-25)
Information theory as a forensics tool for investigating climate mysteries
During Earth's last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly. (2019-10-16)
Biologists track the invasion of herbicide-resistant weeds into southwestern Ontario
A team led by biologists from the University of Toronto have identified the ways in which herbicide-resistant strains of the invasive common waterhemp weed have emerged in fields of soy and corn in southwestern Ontario. (2019-09-30)
Swapping pollinators reduces species diversity, study finds
In a new paper published in Evolution Letters, Carolyn Wessinger and Lena Hileman demonstrate that abandoning one pollinator for another to realize immediate benefits could compromise a flower's long-term survival. (2019-09-10)
Researchers determine pollen abundance and diversity in pollinator-dependent crops
A new study provides valuable insights into pollen abundance and diversity available to honeybee colonies employed in five major pollinator-dependent crops in Oregon and California. (2019-08-30)
Computational approach speeds up advanced microscopy imaging
Researchers have developed a way to enhance the imaging speed of two-photon microscopy up to 5 times without compromising resolution. (2019-08-27)
Wild ground-nesting bees might be exposed to lethal levels of neonics in soil
In a first-ever study investigating the risk of neonicotinoid insecticides to ground-nesting bees, University of Guelph researchers have discovered hoary squash bees are being exposed to lethal levels of the chemicals in the soil. (2019-08-26)
Japanese trees synchronize allergic pollen release over immense distances
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) researchers used tree pollen data for 120 sites across Japan to observe pollen synchronicity at regional and national levels. (2019-08-26)
Cleaning pollutants from water with pollen and spores -- without the 'achoo!' (video)
In addition to their role in plant fertilization and reproduction, pollens and spores have another, hidden talent: With a simple treatment, these cheap, abundant and renewable grains can be converted into tiny sponge-like particles that can be used to grab onto pollutants and remove them from water, scientists report. (2019-08-26)
The journey of the pollen
When insects carry the pollen from one flower to another to pollinate them, the pollen must attach to and detach from different surfaces. (2019-08-20)
Microplastic drifting down with the snow
Over the past several years, microplastic particles have repeatedly been detected in sea-water, drinking water, and even in animals. (2019-08-14)
Where are the bees? Tracking down which flowers they pollinate
Earlham Institute (EI), with the University of East Anglia (UEA), have developed a new method to rapidly identify the sources of bee pollen to understand which flowers are important for bees. (2019-08-08)
Fighting a mighty weed
Weeds are pesky in any situation. Now, imagine a weed so troublesome that it has mutated to resist multiple herbicides. (2019-08-07)
Quantum dots capture speciation in sandplain fynbos on the West Coast of South Africa
With a tongue up to 7 cm long, the long-tongue fly Moegistorhynchus longirostris often battle to fly, especially in the wind. (2019-08-05)
Plant probe could help estimate bee exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides
Bee populations are declining, and neonicotinoid pesticides continue to be investigated -- and in some cases banned -- because of their suspected role as a contributing factor. (2019-07-17)
Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators
Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production. (2019-07-12)
Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance
A team of researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the University of La Rochelle is now the first to have demonstrated that organic farming benefits honeybee colonies, especially when food is scarce in late spring. (2019-06-26)
B chromosome first -- mechanisms behind the drive of B chromosomes uncovered
B chromosomes are supernumerary chromosomes, which often are preferentially inherited and showcase an increased transmission rate. (2019-06-20)
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