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Current Population growth News and Events

Current Population growth News and Events, Population growth News Articles.
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Study develops updated national birth weight reference
A new paper provides an updated national birth weight reference for the United States using the most recent, nationally representative birth data. (2019-06-14)
A new picture of dengue's growing threat
New research shows the expanded risk of dengue virus infection through 2080, with detailed maps for 2020, 2050 and 2080. (2019-06-10)
Education trumps age-structure in terms of providing a demographic dividend
The relationship between population changes and economic growth has been a controversial topic among demographers for many years. (2019-06-10)
Leopard coral grouper: Overexploited
Researchers measured the population stock in Saleh Bay, Indonesia of the commercially valuable leopard coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus), a species subject to population collapse due to high fishing pressure. (2019-06-06)
Counting the uncounted
Though abundance is a fundamental measure in ecology and environmental management, detecting all individuals in a population is usually impossible when monitoring, so estimates of abundance must account for imperfect detection. (2019-06-06)
Is there a demographic need for migration in Europe?
A European Commission-IIASA flagship report has found that an increase in the EU population aged 65+ is certain -- regardless of higher fertility or migration. (2019-06-04)
Snowflakes inform scientists how tooth enamel is formed
Physicists and mathematicians use the classical Stefan problem to explain the principles of crystal formation, such as snowflakes . (2019-05-29)
The message that addiction is a disease makes substance users less likely to seek help
Research finds that people with substance-use problems who read a message describing addiction as a disease are less likely to report wanting to engage in effective therapies, compared to those who read a message that addiction behaviors are subject to change. (2019-05-28)
New study dismisses green growth policies as a route out of ecological emergency
The new study examines green growth policies as articulated in major reports by the World Bank, the OECD and the UN Environment Programme, and tests the theory against extant empirical evidence and models of the relationship between GDP and both material footprint and CO2 emissions. (2019-05-27)
PSA, a prostate cancer marker, activates vascular and lymphangiogenic growth factors
A new study indicates that PSA, a prostate cancer marker, is one of the catalysts that activate vascular endothelial and lymphangiogenic growth factors which contribute to the spread of cancer. (2019-05-24)
New leaf shapes for thale cress
Max Planck researchers equip the plant with pinnate leaves. (2019-05-23)
Progress in family planning in Africa accelerating
A new study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows that women in eight sub-Saharan African countries are gaining access to and using modern contraception at a faster rate than previously projected. (2019-05-20)
Scientists propose rethinking 'endangered species' definition to save slow-breeding giants
Conservation decisions based on population counts may fail to protect large, slow-breeding animals from irrevocable decline, according to new research coinciding with World Endangered Species Day. (2019-05-17)
Human capital benefits of military boost economy by billions
A recent study finds that US government spending on military personnel has a positive impact on the nation's human capital -- essentially improving the American workforce. (2019-05-17)
It's not just fish, plastic pollution harms the bacteria that help us breathe
Ten percent of the oxygen we breathe comes from just one kind of bacteria in the ocean. (2019-05-14)
Bone cells suppress cancer metastases
A subpopulation of bone cells releases factors that can halt the growth of breast cancer that's traveled to the bone, putting the cells in stasis. (2019-05-13)
Collagen fibres grow like a sunflower
In a new study published in EPJ E, two researchers at the Universite Paris-sud in Orsay, France, examine the patterns developed by collagen fibers, found in the tissues of virtually all animals. (2019-05-13)
Low-cost intervention boosts undergraduate interest in computer science
A recent study finds that an online intervention taking less than 30 minutes significantly increased interest in computer science for both male and female undergraduate students. (2019-05-06)
Tumor cells' drug addiction may be their downfall
Work by researchers at the Babraham Institute in partnership with the global biopharmaceutical company AstraZeneca shows how cancer cells' acquired resistance to anti-cancer drugs proves fatal once the treatment compound is withdrawn. (2019-05-02)
Why can't we all get along (like Namibia's pastoralists and wildlife?)
Scientists interviewed pastoralists in Namibia's Namib Desert to see how they felt about conflicts with wildlife, which can include lions and cheetahs preying on livestock and elephants and zebras eating crops. (2019-05-02)
Study finds improved WIC food packages reduced obesity risk for children
A decade ago, the federal government overhauled nutrition standards for food packages in its primary food assistance program for young mothers and their children. (2019-04-23)
Rutgers researchers discover crucial link between brain and gut stem cells
Researchers at Rutgers University have identified a new factor that is essential for maintaining the stem cells in the brain and gut and whose loss may contribute to anxiety and cognitive disorders and to gastrointestinal diseases. (2019-04-15)
Microbiome of baby's first stool is associated with overweight at age 3 years
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the early microbiome (population of gut bacteria) in newborn babies is able to predict the risk of the child subsequently becoming overweight. (2019-04-12)
Advanced virtual technology captures how coral reefs recover after bleaching
Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and engineers at UC San Diego have used new imaging software to detect dramatic recovery after a bleaching event on the reefs surrounding remote Palmyra Atoll in the tropical Pacific. (2019-04-11)
Cancer: Central role of cell 'skeleton' discovered
All cells possess a cytoskeleton which allows them to move and maintain their shape. (2019-04-10)
The decline of state-level IVC filter utilization
National inferior vena cava (IVC) filter utilization in the Medicare population has declined over the last decade according to a prior Harvey L. (2019-04-04)
Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization, study finds
In a study of 200 years of pre-industrial Quebecois genealogical history, researchers at Brown found that fertility-related changes in natural selection during the pre-industrial era paved the way for economic and technological progress. (2019-04-04)
Creating blood vessels on demand
Researchers discover new cell population that can help in regenerative processes. (2019-04-03)
Human history through tree rings: Trees in Amazonia reveal pre-colonial human disturbance
The Brazil nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa) is well known around the world today and has been an important part of human subsistence strategies in the Amazon forest from at least the Early Holocene. (2019-04-03)
New record on the growth of graphene single crystals
An exciting rapid growth of large graphene single crystal on liquid Cu with the rate up to 79 μm s-1 based on the liquid metal chemical vapor deposition strategy was released by Lei Fu et al. in Science China Materials. (2019-04-02)
Brain growth inhibited by heavy alcohol use
New research in nonhuman primates shows that heavy use of alcohol can actually slow the rate of growth in developing brains. (2019-04-01)
Origin of Scandinavian wolves clarified
There are no signs that hybrids of dog and wolf have contributed to the Scandinavian wolf population -- a matter that has been discussed, especially in Norway. (2019-03-29)
Biologists find a way to boost intestinal stem cell populations
MIT and University of Tokyo biologists have found that aging takes a toll on intestinal stem cells and may contribute to increased susceptibility to disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. (2019-03-28)
Future of elephants living in captivity hangs in the balance
Scientists at the University of Sheffield and University of Turku are looking at ways to boost captive populations of Asian elephants without relying on taking them from the wild. (2019-03-26)
Craft breweries increase residential property values
Researchers focused on properties sold between 2002 and 2017 in Charlotte, North Carolina, within a half mile of a brewery. (2019-03-25)
Bacterial population growth rate linked to how individual cells control their size
Physicists from the University of Pennsylvania have developed a model that describes how individual parameters, like the variability in growth and the timing of cell division, can influence population dynamics in bacteria. (2019-03-25)
Cost savings from growth hormone insurance strategies not passed on to patients
Increasingly aggressive insurance strategies have lowered the total costs and insurance costs of growth hormone drugs, but those savings are not being passed on to patients, according to new research to be presented Sunday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. (2019-03-24)
Patients bear increased financial burden for growth hormone treatment despite FDA approval
Despite an FDA approval of growth hormone treatment for children with idiopathic short stature (ISS), the mean cost burden to patients and their families has increased over time. (2019-03-24)
Children grow in a different way, scientists demonstrate
An international group of scientists under the supervision of a staff member of Sechenov University (Russia) and Karolinska Institute (Sweden) found out that earlier views on the mechanisms that provide and regulate skeletal growth were wrong. (2019-03-20)
From foam to bone: Plant cellulose can pave the way for healthy bone implants
Researchers from the University of British Columbia and McMaster University have developed what could be the bone implant material of the future: an airy, foamlike substance from plant cellulose that can be injected into the body and provide scaffolding for the growth of new bone. (2019-03-19)
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