Current Population growth News and Events

Current Population growth News and Events, Population growth News Articles.
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New modified wheat could help tackle global food shortage
Researchers at the University of York have created a new modified wheat variety that increases grain production by up to 12%. (2020-11-25)

Plant research seals importance of microbes for survival and growth
Scientists have revealed that plants have a 'sealing' mechanism supported by microbes in the root that are vital for the intake of nutrients for survival and growth. (2020-11-20)

A bypass route for the coronary vessels in the heart?
When the heart develops, some of its coronary blood vessels develop from cells lining the inner surface of the heart's ventricular chambers (endocardium). Novel findings suggest that new blood vessel growth in the heart can be stimulated with the VEGF-B growth factor from the same source after myocardial infarction to increase blood delivery to the damaged area. (2020-11-19)

Prostate cancer: CRYM protein inhibits tumour growth
Prostate cancer is caused by elevated hormone levels, and tumours are generally treated using hormone therapy. A research team headed by Lukas Kenner of MedUni Vienna in collaboration with David Heery from the University of Nottingham/UK and Sarka Pospisilova and Suzanne Turner of the University of Brno/Czech Republic have shown that the protein μ-crystallin (CRYM) plays a significant part in tumour growth. The higher the levels of this protein that are present, the better the prognosis. (2020-11-18)

Records from six growth studies analyzed to provide milestone data
For the first time ever, craniofacial growth in children can be studied comprehensively using data from six historic adolescent growth studies. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine analyzed more than 15,000 cranial radiographs from nearly 2,000 participants to create the Craniofacial Growth Consortium Study (CGCS). (2020-11-17)

Global fisheries could alleviate a global food emergency in extreme situations
A new international study argues that, if managed sustainably in advance, global fisheries could alleviate food shortages even after a nuclear war. (2020-11-09)

Shifts in water temperatures affect eating habits of larval tuna at critical life stage
Small shifts in ocean temperature can have significant effects on the eating habits of blackfin tuna during the larval stage of development, when finding food and growing quickly are critical to long-term survival. (2020-11-05)

Dietary supplement may help in the treatment of fatty liver
A recent study by researchers at the University of Jyväskylä was successful in partially preventing fatty liver disease in rats. Rats with fatty liver disease were fed with a dietary supplement that is known to increase the growth of good bacteria in the gut. Simultaneous with the increased abundance of the bacteria, the liver fat content decreased significantly. In addition, preliminary results from a human study seem promising. (2020-11-04)

Violent encounters between gorillas slow population growth rate
A new study by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund and UC Davis used five decades of data to show how social behavior explains fluctuations in the growth rate of a subpopulation of mountain gorillas. The researchers found that as gorilla group density increases, violent encounters between groups occur more frequently. As a result, infant mortality has increased dramatically, causing the population growth to slow down significantly in recent years. (2020-11-04)

Plot twist
The black rats weren't supposed to be there, on Palmyra Atoll. Likely arriving at the remote Pacific islet network as stowaways with the US Navy during World War II, the rodents, with no natural predators, simply took over. Omnivorous eating machines, they dined on seabird eggs, native crabs and whatever seed and seedling they could find. (2020-11-04)

????Strain of rhizobacteria shown to naturally and sustainably promote rice growth
''Our study has demonstrated that B. pumilus LZP02 colonizes rice roots and promotes growth by improving carbohydrate metabolism and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis,'' explained Zhigang Wang, one of the scientists involved in the research. ''These findings show a new light on how microbes and plants communicate in a friendly way.'' (2020-11-04)

Neanderthal children grew and were weaned similar to us
From the analysis of three milk teeth belonging to Neanderthal children who lived between 70,000 and 45,000 years ago in Northeastern Italy, it emerges that their growth rate was very similar to ours: the discovery leads to exclude that late weaning could be among the causes that led to the disappearance of this human species (2020-11-02)

Random effects key to containing epidemics
To control an epidemic, authorities will often impose varying degrees of lockdown. In the journal Chaos, scientists have discovered, using mathematics and computer simulations, why dividing a large population into multiple subpopulations that do not intermix can help contain outbreaks without imposing contact restrictions within those local communities. When infection numbers are high, random effects can be ignored. But subdividing a population can create communities so small that the random effects matter. (2020-10-27)

Air pollution, green space and built environment characteristics may influence body mass index durin
A new study of almost 80,000 children living in urban areas of Catalonia has, for the first time, analysed the relationship between urban exposures and BMI growth trajectories (2020-10-26)

A molecular break for root growth
The dynamic change in root growth of plants plays an important role in their adjustment to soil conditions. Depending on the location, nutrients or moisture can be found in higher or lower soil layers. This is why, depending on the situation, a short or a long root is advantageous. Caroline Gutjahr, Professor of Plant Genetics at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), and her team investigate how plant hormones influence the growth of roots. (2020-10-26)

New technology tracks role of macrophages in cancer spread
A Morgridge imaging study of macrophages -- immune cells that are important to human health, but paradoxically can help some cancers grow and spread -- is offering better ways to understand these cells and target them with immunotherapies. (2020-10-26)

How bacteria adapt their machinery for optimum growth
The tiny 'machines' that keep the processes in bacterial cells going are made up of a large number of different proteins and RNA molecules. Depending on their growth rate, bacteria have to produce these in different concentrations. Bioinformatics researchers from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have developed a model that explains for the first time the precise composition of this molecular 'cocktail' for a central cellular system. Their findings, which are also relevant for biotechnology, are presented in the scientific journal Nature Communications. (2020-10-16)

World first study shows that some microorganisms can bend the rules of evolution
The dominant thinking in evolution focuses on inheritance between parent and offspring - or 'vertical gene transfer (VGT)'. But now scientists are paying more attention to 'horizontal gene transfer (HGT)': the transmission of DNA other than from parent to offspring, as this transfer can tell us about the evolution of a number of other organisms such as bacteria. It can also help us to better understand antibiotic resistance. (2020-10-13)

Phosphorus deficit may disrupt regional food supply chains
Phosphorus-based fertilizer is essential in modern agriculture. In regions with high population growth, more phosphorus will be needed to produce more food. A new study shows that world regions with high population growth rates are also the regions with the highest phosphorus deficit. It also quantifies the environmental impact of a business-as-usual scenario in the phosphorus supply chain to 2050 and identifies alarming rates of pollution and greenhouse gas emissions associated with the phosphorus supply. (2020-10-07)

Nights warming faster than days across much of the planet
Global warming is affecting daytime and night-time temperatures differently - and greater night-time warming is more common than greater daytime warming worldwide - new research shows. (2020-09-30)

In the arctic, extreme air pollution kills trees, limits growth by reducing sunlight
At the most heavily polluted site on Earth, dendroecology, dendrochemistry, and process-based forward modelling were used to explore the relationship of tree growth and mortality with industrial pollution. (2020-09-29)

Copycat plant booster improves on nature
A molecular mimic designed to promote plant growth and limit witchweed infestation shows promise in initial trials. (2020-09-28)

Secondary variant of Photorhabdus luminescens interacts with plant roots
One of the basic approaches in organic farming is to use organisms beneficial to the system to combat pests. The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is one such beneficial organism. Yet, it seems this is not the only ability of Photorhabdus that can be exploited for organic plant cultivation. A German research team has discovered additional properties that could significantly extend its range of uses. (2020-09-24)

Study reveals higher COVID-19 mortality in men could be explained by differences in circulating proteins and immune system cells
New research presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Diseases (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) suggests that the higher risk of poor COVID-19 outcomes in men could be explained by differences in circulating proteins and immune system cells compared with women. The study is by Gizem Kilic, Radbound University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands, and colleagues. (2020-09-24)

New insights into colorectal cancer: Growth factor R-spondin suppresses tumor growth
R-spondin, which enhances the growth of healthy cells in the gut, suppresses the growth of intestinal adenoma cells, thus reducing the formation of intestinal tumors. (2020-09-23)

Glyphosate residue in manure fertilizer decrease strawberry and meadow fescue growth
A new study finds that glyphosate residue from herbicides in manure fertilizer decrease the growth of strawberry and meadow fescue as well as runner production of strawberry. (2020-09-18)

Coconut rhinoceros beetle makes unexpected 'host shift' to Guam's cycad trees
Researchers at the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam have documented what biologists call a ''host shift'' of the coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam. The beetle, first documented as an invasive species in Guam in 2007, has been devastating the island's ubiquitous coconut trees and is now also burrowing into Guam's endangered native cycad tree, Cycas micronesica. (2020-09-16)

Climate crisis ages fish, amphibians and reptiles
Climatic conditions are changing at an unprecedented rate, affecting mainly fish, amphibians and reptiles, ectothermic animals that are unable to generate their own internal heat. With heat waves and rising temperatures, these organisms experience not only increased growth rates and heat stress, but also further ageing. (2020-09-16)

In the absence of otters, climate warming leads to Aleutian Reef decline
Sea otters prey on urchins and keep their population in check. When otters disappear, urchin populations explode, leading to overgrazing on kelp and a decline in kelp forests. (2020-09-10)

How birth control, girls' education can slow population growth
Education and family planning have long been tied to lower fertility trends. But new research from the University of Washington analyzes those factors to determine, what accelerates a decline in otherwise high-fertility countries. (2020-09-08)

Study finds hospital-diagnosed overweight or obesity linked with markedly higher risk of death over 40 years
Individuals whose overweight or obesity is diagnosed in hospital are 60% more likely to die compared to the general population, according to a nationwide Danish study that followed over 1.9 million people for up to 40 years, being presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO), held online this year from 1-4 September. (2020-09-02)

Vertebral body tethering shows clinical success as treatment for scoliosis
Scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity affecting pediatric patients. A posterior spinal fusion (PSF) is the gold standard treatment for patients with curves exceeding 45 degrees, but the procedure's drawbacks include the loss of spinal mobility, persistent pain and adjacent segment disc disease. However, a new retrospective study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine shows an alternative to PSF called vertebral body tethering (VBT) yields promising results with fewer long-term consequences for a specific group of scoliosis patients. (2020-08-27)

Blocking cellular communication stops SARS-CoV-2
Many viruses use and manipulate the communication pathways of their host cells to boost their own replication. Now biochemists and virologists from Goethe University and University Hospital Frankfurt have drawn a complete picture of communication within human cells infected with SARS-CoV-2. In cell culture experiments, the researchers succeeded in stopping virus replication with a series of cancer drugs tested in clinical practice. The drugs target the places where several of the cell's communication pathways meet. (2020-08-25)

Living at higher altitudes associated with higher levels of child stunting
Children living at high altitudes found to be more stunted, on average, than peers at lower altitudes. The deficit increases above 500 meters above sea level, and persists as children age, indicating the need to tailor nutrition interventions targeted at children living in high altitudes. (2020-08-24)

Newly identified gut cells nurture lymph capillaries
IBS research team has identified new subsets of gut connective cells, which are crucial for lymphatic growth.The findings imply a crucial link between the physiology of intestinal environment and biological interactions between cell types. (2020-08-14)

Changes in climate and land cover affecting European migratory bird populations
Changes in climate and habitat on the breeding and non-breeding grounds of migratory birds are both playing an important part in driving their long-term population changes. (2020-08-14)

Harvard research identifies business travel as driver of economic growth
Research from Harvard Kennedy School's Growth Lab finds a direct link between a country's incoming business travel and the growth of new and existing industries. The findings, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, support a Growth Lab hypothesis that moving 'knowhow' is critical to economic growth, and business travel plays a key part in that process. The research also raises new concerns about the economic implications of the international travel restrictions imposed to combat COVID-19. (2020-08-11)

Forest growth in drier climates will be impacted by reduced snowpack, PSU study finds
A new study suggests that future reductions in seasonal snowpack as a result of climate change may negatively influence forest growth in semi-arid climates, but less so in wetter climates. (2020-08-10)

Genes related to down syndrome abnormalities may protect against solid tumors
Scientists from Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago discovered that a set of genes with decreased expression in individuals with Down syndrome may lead to clinical abnormalities in this population, such as poor muscle development and heart valve problems. Impairment in these same genes may also protect people with Down syndrome from developing solid tumors. Their findings were published in Scientific Reports. (2020-08-06)

More carbon in the ocean can lead to smaller fish
As humans continue to send large quantities of carbon into the atmosphere, much of that carbon is absorbed by the ocean, and UConn researchers have found high CO2 concentrations in water can make fish grow smaller. (2020-08-04)

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