Current Pore structures News and Events

Current Pore structures News and Events, Pore structures News Articles.
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Carbon nanocomposites are now one step closer to practical industrial
Multifunctional materials were designed to allow self-diagnostic monitoring through an inexpensive technique. These materials were created by adding the carbon nanoparticles to polymer matrices. Essentially, the use of such materials has the potential to replace sensors in weight critical systems such as aircraft structures, with the material itself being able to provide measurements. (2020-11-23)

Metal-organic frameworks become flexible
Materials consisting of inorganic and organic components can combine the best of two worlds: under certain circumstances, the so-called MOFs - short for metal-organic frameworks - are structured in the same order as crystals and are at the same time porous and deformable. This opens up the prospect of intelligent materials for energy-saving technical applications. However, so far only a few flexible MOFs have been identified. (2020-11-17)

Novel glass materials made from organic and inorganic components
Researchers from the Universities of Jena and Cambridge have succeeded in creating a new class of hybrid glass materials that combine organic and inorganic components. To do this, the scientists use special material combinations in which chemical bonds between organometallic and inorganic glasses can be generated. They included materials composed of organometallic networks. This is primarily because their framework structures can be created in a targeted manner. (2020-11-16)

New phase of modeling the viscous coupling effects of multiphase fluid flow
Researchers led by Kyushu University found a way to incorporate key phenomena called viscous coupling effects into models of multiphase flow in porous materials. The technique combines two approaches--pore network modeling and the lattice Boltzmann method--to provide detailed pore-scale information and good computational efficiency. The work could have implications for many applications that involve multiphase flow in porous materials, such as oil recovery and carbon dioxide storage. (2020-11-16)

Image release: Galaxies in the Perseus Cluster
New VLA images show how the crowded environment of a cluster of galaxies affects the individual galaxies, helping astronomers better understand some of the complex details of such an environment. (2020-11-12)

Study reveals how to improve natural gas production in shale
A new hydrocarbon study contradicts conventional wisdom about how methane is trapped in rock, revealing a new strategy to more easily access the valuable energy resource. (2020-11-12)

Chemists discover the structure of a key coronavirus protein
MIT chemists have determined the molecular structure of a protein found in the SARS-CoV-2 virus. This protein forms a cation-selective channel and plays a key role in the virus's ability to replicate itself. If researchers could devise ways to block this channel, they may be able to reduce the pathogenicity of the virus and interfere with viral replication. (2020-11-12)

New prognostic markers for colon cancer identified
The study recently published by MedUni Vienna and collaborative partners nominates ILSs as novel prognostic players orchestrating the pathobiology of metastatic colorectal cancer. (2020-11-11)

RNA structures of coronavirus reveal potential drug targets
The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus RNA genome structure was studied in detail by researchers from the University of Groningen, the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Warsaw, and Leiden University. The RNA structures are potential targets for the development of drugs against the virus. The results were published on 10 November as 'Breakthrough paper' in the journal Nucleic Acid Research. (2020-11-10)

CrystEngComm celebrates the CSD in a special issue
The journal CrystEngComm has published a special issue to mark the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) reaching 1 million structures, with 33 papers that highlight the breadth of applications made possible with this data. (2020-11-10)

Coating plastics by porous nanofilm
A research team has developed a new method for creating metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films that can be applied to sensors and electric devices. (2020-11-09)

When malaria parasites trick liver cells to let themselves in
A new study led by Maria Manuel Mota, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular, now shows that malaria parasites secrete the protein EXP2 that is required for their entry into hepatocytes. These findings, published today in the scientific journal Nature Communications, open a new avenue for prophylactic anti-malarial strategies, since blocking or decreasing the infection of the liver can prevent the disease. (2020-11-06)

New insights into 3D printing of spacers and membranes
To also address the controversies on the feasibility of 3D printing for membranes, researchers from SUTD and NTU have coined a new term 'hybrid additive manufacturing' for the water treatment industry. (2020-11-06)

The importance of good neighbors in catalysis
Are you affected by your neighbors? So are nanoparticles in catalysts. New research from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, published in the journals Science Advances and Nature Communications, reveals how the nearest neighbors determine how well nanoparticles work in a catalyst. (2020-11-03)

The craters on Earth
A two-volume atlas presents and explains the impact sites of meteorites and asteroids worldwide (2020-11-03)

RUDN University chemists developed new magnetic and luminescent lanthanide-siloxane-based compounds
A team of chemists from RUDN University synthesized new organosilicon compounds containing terbium and europium ions. These complexes have an unusual cage-like crystal structure that contains four metal ions. The team was the first to study the magnetic and photophysical properties of such compounds and to observe their magnetic phase transition and luminescence properties. (2020-11-03)

Scientists discover new structures in the smallest ice cube
A research team led by Prof. JIANG Ling and Prof. YANG Xueming from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. LI Jun from Tsinghua University, revealed the coexistence of five cubic isomers in the smallest ice cube, including two with chirality. (2020-10-29)

Magnetic nature of complex vortex-like structures in a Kagome crystal Fe3Sn2
Three-dimensional magnetic bubbles were demonstrated from the view of integral magnetizations for the first time, which clarify the physics behind complex multi-ring and arc-shaped vortices obtained from two-dimensional transmission electron microscopy magnetic imaging. (2020-10-28)

Liquid nanofoam: A game changer for future football helmets
A liquid nanofoam liner undergoing testing could prolong the safe use of football helmets, says a Michigan State University researcher. (2020-10-28)

Computer vision helps find binding sites in drug targets
Scientists from the iMolecule group at Skoltech developed BiteNet, a machine learning (ML) algorithm that helps find drug binding sites, i.e. potential drug targets, in proteins. BiteNet can analyze 1,000 protein structures in 1.5 minutes and find optimal spots for drug molecules to attach. (2020-10-27)

Beaches can survive sea-level rises as long as they have space to move
An international team of coastal scientists has dismissed suggestions that half the world's beaches could become extinct over the course of the 21st century. (2020-10-27)

Ancient lake contributed to past San Andreas fault ruptures
he San Andreas fault, which runs along the western coast of North America and crosses dense population centers like Los Angeles, California, is one of the most-studied faults in North America because of its significant hazard risk. Based on its roughly 150-year recurrence interval for magnitude 7.5 earthquakes and the fact that it's been over 300 years since that's happened, the southern San Andreas fault has long been called 'overdue' for such an earthquake. (2020-10-26)

New tricks for old antibiotics
The study published in the journal Immunity reveals that tetracyclines (broad spectre antibiotics), by partially inhibiting cell mitochondria activity, induce a compensatory response on the organism that decreases tissue damage caused during infection. This finding opens new doors in the field of disease tolerance and positions this group of antibiotics as potential adjuvant treatment for sepsis, due to their effects that go beyond the control of bacterial burden. (2020-10-22)

Highly selective membranes
Membranes with microscopic pores are useful for water filtration. The effect of pore size on water filtration is well-understood, as is the role of ions, charged atoms, that interact with the membrane. For the first time, researchers have successfully described the impact water molecules have on other water molecules and on ions as part of the filtration mechanism. The researchers detail a feedback system between water molecules which opens up new design possibilities for highly selective membranes. Applications could include virus filters. (2020-10-20)

A new material for separating CO2 from industrial waste gases, natural gas, or biogas
With the new material, developed at the University of Bayreuth, the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) can be specifically separated from industrial waste gases, natural gas, or biogas, and thereby made available for recycling. The separation process is both energy efficient and cost-effective. (2020-10-20)

Repairing the photosynthetic enzyme Rubisco
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry decipher the molecular mechanism of Rubisco Activase (2020-10-20)

Climate change undermines the safety of buildings and infrastructure in Europe
The higher temperatures expected over the next 50 years in Europe will accelerate corrosion of buildings, and will expose infrastructure to higher stresses, thus undermining the safety of constructions. CMCC researchers and members of the scientific network established by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, co-authored two studies, suggesting a review of the EU standards for structural design. (2020-10-14)

Making new materials using AI
POSTECH Professors Daesu Lee and Si-Young Choi's joint research team demonstrates a novel physical phenomenon by controlling variations of the atomic structure. (2020-10-14)

New mechanism affecting nerve impulses discovered
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have discovered a new mechanism by which substances can open a certain type of ion channel and in this way regulate nerve impulses. The study, published in the scientific journal PNAS, identifies a large group of substances that influence the coupling between the various functional parts of an ion channel. The discovery may help in the development of future drugs. (2020-10-12)

Ants adapt tool use to avoid drowning
Researchers have observed black imported fire ants using sand to draw liquid food out of containers, when faced with the risk of drowning. This is the first time this sophisticated tool use has been reported in animals. These findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology. (2020-10-08)

Minimizing the movement problem in single-particle cryo-EM
While single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has enabled access to structures of proteins that were previously intractable and, most recently, has done much to inform our understanding of SARS-CoV-2 structure, the technique still has some weaknesses. (2020-10-08)

Research shows cell perturbation system could have medical applications
Research by a team from Northwestern Engineering shows that the Nanofountain Probe Electroporation system may lead to quicker and more customized medical treatment plans. (2020-10-02)

Scientists kill cancer cells by 'shutting the door' to the nucleus
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that blocking the construction of nuclear pores complexes--large channels that control the flow of materials in and out of the cell nucleus--shrank aggressive tumors in mice while leaving healthy cells unharmed. The study, published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, reveals a new Achilles heel for cancer that may lead to better treatments for deadly tumors such as melanoma, leukemia and colorectal cancer. (2020-09-28)

PLUS takes 3D ultrasound images of solids
A two-in-one technology provides 3D images of structural defects, such as those that can develop in aircraft and power plants. (2020-09-25)

Materials scientists learn how to make liquid crystal shape-shift
A new 3D-printing method will make it easier to manufacture and control the shape of soft robots, artificial muscles and wearable devices. Researchers at UC San Diego show that by controlling the printing temperature of liquid crystal elastomer, they can control the material's degree of stiffness and ability to contract--known as degree of actuation. What's more, they are able to change the stiffness of different areas in the same material by exposing it to heat. (2020-09-25)

A Sudoku-solving algorithm holds promise for protein medicine
Computational biologists from the University of Toronto have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that has the potential to design novel protein molecules as finely tuned therapeutics. (2020-09-23)

NIST scientists get soft on 3D printing
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new method of 3D-printing gels and other soft materials. Published in a new paper, it has the potential to create complex structures with nanometer-scale precision. (2020-09-22)

Marine sponges inspire the next generation of skyscrapers and bridges
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are using the glassy skeletons of marine sponges as inspiration for the next generation of stronger and taller buildings, longer bridges, and lighter spacecraft. The researchers showed that the diagonally-reinforced square lattice-like skeletal structure of Euplectella aspergillum, a deep-water marine sponge, has a higher strength-to-weight ratio than the traditional lattice designs that have used for centuries in the construction of buildings and bridges. (2020-09-21)

Secret of plant dietary fibre structure revealed
Researchers from The University of Queensland and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have uncovered the mechanics of how plant cell walls balance the strength and rigidity provided by cellulose with its ability to stretch and compress. This discovery helps explain how plant structures can range from floppy grasses to hard wood trees and is important for understanding dietary fibre properties in nutrition. The findings also have applications in medicine, agriculture and a range of other industries. (2020-09-17)

TRESK regulates brain to track time using sunlight as its cue
Research from the University of Kent has found that TRESK, a calcium regulated two-pore potassium channel, regulates the brain's central circadian clock to differentiate behaviour between day and night. (2020-09-14)

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