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Current Positive emotions News and Events

Current Positive emotions News and Events, Positive emotions News Articles.
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Foreign leaders generate more emotional response from Dublin voters than Irish politicians on Brexit
Among the 11 elected leaders studied, Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney evoked the weakest emotional response from the audience with a 29.5 rating. (2019-10-17)
Consumers trust influencers less when there is a variety of choices for a product
Consumers have been relying on opinion leader recommendations to make choices about product quality and purchases for a long time. (2019-10-16)
Cultivating joy through mindfulness: An antidote to opioid misuse, the disease of despair
New research shows that a specific mind-body therapy, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), increases the brain's response to natural, healthy rewards while also decreasing the brain's response to opioid-related cues. (2019-10-16)
Mindfulness may reduce opioid cravings, study finds
People suffering from opioid addiction and chronic pain may have fewer cravings and less pain if they use both mindfulness techniques and medication for opioid dependence, according to Rutgers and other researchers. (2019-10-15)
Bad behavior between moms driven by stereotypes, judgment
Mothers are often their own toughest critics, but new Iowa State University research shows they judge other mothers just as harshly. (2019-10-09)
A new strategy to alleviate sadness: Bring the emotion to life
Anthropomorphizing the emotion of sadness (thinking of sadness as a person) can decrease levels of sadness, which can help people consequently avoid making impulsive buying decisions. (2019-10-02)
People with anxiety may strategically choose worrying over relaxing
Relaxing is supposed to be good for the body and soul, but people with anxiety may actively resist relaxation and continue worrying to avoid a large jump in anxiety if something bad does happen, according to Penn State research. (2019-09-30)
Does being a 'superwoman' protect African American women's health?
A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers explores whether different facets of being a strong black woman, which researchers sometimes refer to as 'superwoman schema,' ultimately protect women from the negative health impacts of racial discrimination -- or cause more harm. (2019-09-30)
Molecular link between chronic pain and depression revealed
Researchers at Hokkaido University have identified the brain mechanism linking chronic pain and depression in rats. (2019-09-26)
Nonverbal signals can create bias against larger groups
If children are exposed to bias against one person, will they develop a bias against that person's entire group? (2019-09-23)
For kids who face trauma, good neighbors or teachers can save their longterm health
New research shows just how important positive childhood experiences are for long-term health, especially for those who experience significant adversity as a child. (2019-09-16)
Same but different: unique cancer traits key to targeted therapies
Melbourne researchers have discovered that the key to personalised therapies for some types of lung cancers may be to focus on their differences, not their similarities. (2019-09-13)
Negative posts on Facebook business pages outweigh positive posts 2 to 1
There are more than 60 million business pages on Facebook and that number is from 2017. (2019-09-13)
How marketers can shape customer sentiment during events
Marketers' ability to influence user-generated content surrounding customers' brand or firm-related interactions, and its sentiment in particular, may be an un-tapped use of social media in marketing. (2019-09-12)
Case management in primary care associated with positive outcomes
In a systematic review, researchers identified three characteristics of case management programs that consistently yielded positive results: case selection for frequent users with complex problems, high-intensity case management interventions and a multidisciplinary care plan. (2019-09-09)
For better adult mental and relational health, boost positive childhood experiences
Positive childhood experiences, such as supportive family interactions, caring relationships with friends, and connections in the community, are associated with reductions in chances of adult depression and poor mental health, and increases in the chances of having healthy relationships in adulthood, a new study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests. (2019-09-09)
Association of positive childhood experiences and adult mental health, depression
Reporting more positive childhood experiences was associated with a lower likelihood of adult depression or poor mental heath, or both, and a greater likelihood of adults reporting social and emotional support even after accounting for adverse childhood experiences in this observational study based on survey data representative of the entire population of adults in Wisconsin in 2015. (2019-09-09)
South African study highlights links between low language ability and poor mental health
A new study from our researchers at the universities of Bath (UK) and Stellenbosch (South Africa) focuses on language acquisition for young people in Khayelitsha near Cape Town. (2019-09-06)
As light as a lemon: How the right smell can help with a negative body image
The scent of a lemon could help people feel better about their body image, new findings from University of Sussex research has revealed. (2019-09-05)
Obesity and psychosocial well-being among patients with cancer
In a study published in Psycho-Oncology, excess weight was linked with poorer psychosocial health among older adults diagnosed with breast cancer or prostate cancer. (2019-09-05)
Emoji buttons gauge emergency department sentiments in real time
Simple button terminals stationed around emergency departments featuring 'emoji' reflecting a range of emotions are effective in monitoring doctor and patient sentiments in real time. (2019-09-04)
Can AI spot liars?
Though algorithms are increasingly being deployed in all facets of life, a new USC study has found that they fail basic tests as truth detectors. (2019-09-04)
Friendships factor into start-up success (and failure)
New research co-authored by Cass Business School academics has found entrepreneurial groups with strong friendship bonds are more likely to persist with a failing venture and escalate financial commitment to it. (2019-08-29)
Estimate of the national burden of HPV-positive oropharyngeal head and neck cancers
Investigators from the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center (DFBWCC) have conducted the largest study to date on the incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in the U.S., finding that 75 percent of oropharynx cancers are related to HPV and the U.S. incidence of HPV-related throat cancer is 4.6 per 100,000 people, peaking in those aged 60-64. (2019-08-28)
Neurological brain markers might detect risk for psychotic disorders
People who may hear and see things that are not there could have symptoms of psychosis, better known as psychotic disorders. (2019-08-27)
New evidence that optimists live longer
After decades of research, a new study links optimism and prolonged life. (2019-08-26)
Two studies reveal benefits of mindfulness for middle school students
Two new studies from MIT suggest that mindfulness -- the practice of focusing one's awareness on the present moment -- can enhance academic performance and mental health in middle-schoolers. (2019-08-26)
Oncologists echo findings that suggest a reduced risk of breast cancer recurrence
Oncologists at VCU Massey Cancer Center were invited to co-author an editorial published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology providing expert commentary on findings from a large study conducted by German investigators that a modified drug combination may lead to a decreased chance of disease recurrence for women with high risk, HER-2 negative breast cancer. (2019-08-26)
Water availability determines carbon uptake under climate warming: study
A research group led by Dr. NIU Shuli from the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that water availability in soil determines the direction of carbon-climate feedback. (2019-08-22)
Winning coaches' locker room secret
Researchers found a significant relationship between how negative a coach was at half-time and how well the team played in the second half: The more negativity, the more the team outscored the opposition. (2019-08-15)
Predictability of parent interaction positively influences child's development
A joint project of the University of Turku's FinnBrain study and the University of California-Irvine (US) investigated the impact of the predictability of parent interaction on a child's development. (2019-08-15)
Wiggling it beats a path for a better performance at school
QUT early childhood researchers develop fun rhythm and movement program to support young children's brains. (2019-08-15)
Study reveals the emotional journey of a digital detox while travelling
New research reveals the emotional journey that tourists go on when they disconnect from technology and social media while travelling. (2019-08-13)
AI tool characterizes a song's genre & provides insights regarding perception music
An artificial intelligence tool developed by USC computer science researchers can characterize a song's genre and provides increased understanding how we perceive and process music. (2019-08-12)
Study finds older adults less distracted by negative information
USC researchers looked at 'emotion-induced blindness,' which refers to distractions caused by emotionally arousing stimuli. (2019-08-12)
Study assesses outcomes for meth users with burn injures
UC Davis Health researchers were surprised to find that methamphetamine use is not linked with worse health outcomes among burn patients, but was associated with significantly worse discharge conditions for meth-positive patients. (2019-08-01)
Clearing up the 'dark side' of artificial leaves
While artificial leaves hold promise as a way to take carbon dioxide -- a potent greenhouse gas -- out of the atmosphere, there is a 'dark side to artificial leaves that has gone overlooked for more than a decade,' according to Meenesh Singh, assistant professor of chemical engineering in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering. (2019-07-31)
PE fitness tests have little positive impact for students
A new study reveals that school fitness tests have little impact on student attitudes to PE -- contrary to polarized views on their merits -- and for many students, fitness testing during PE may be wasting valuable class time when used in isolation from the curriculum. (2019-07-30)
How can you reliably spot a fake smile? Ask a computer
Real and fake smiles can be tricky to tell apart, but researchers at the University of Bradford have now developed computer software that can spot false facial expressions. (2019-07-29)
A computer that understands how you feel
Neuroscientists have developed a brain-inspired computer system that can look at an image and determine what emotion it evokes in people. (2019-07-26)
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