Current Positive emotions News and Events

Current Positive emotions News and Events, Positive emotions News Articles.
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Predi-COVID preliminary results
Launched under the aegis of the Research Luxembourg COVID-19 Task Force on April 24th, ''Predi-COVID '' is a cohort study promoted by the Luxembourg Institute of Health that aims to identify the key risk factors and biomarkers associated with COVID-19 severity and comprehend the long-term health consequences of the disease. The protocol of the study was published on November 24th in the British Medical Journal Open, reinforcing the international visibility and success of this highly collaborative ''Made in Luxembourg'' project. (2020-11-24)

Study involving seven children's hospitals shows COVID-19 typically mild in children
In the largest U.S. study of its kind to date, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and other PEDSnet sites report that of more than 135,000 pediatric patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 in pediatric health systems, 4% tested positive for the virus. However, the researchers also found patients from ethnic minorities, adolescents, patients with history of public insurance, and those with certain underlying medical conditions were more likely to test positive. (2020-11-23)

Scientists identify brain cells that help drive bodily reaction to fear, anxiety
UNC School of Medicine discovered that artificially forcing the activity of BNST cells in mice produced an arousal response in the form of dilated pupils and faster heart rate, and worsened anxiety-like behaviors. This helps illuminate the neural roots of emotions, and point to the possibility that the human-brain counterpart of the newly identified population of arousal-related neurons might be a target of future treatments for anxiety disorders and other illnesses involving abnormal arousal responses. (2020-11-23)

Memories create 'fingerprints' that reveal how the brain is organized
While the broad architecture and organization of the human brain is universal, new research shows how the differences between how people reimagine common scenarios can be observed in brain activity and quantified. These unique neurological signatures could ultimately be used to understand, study, and even improve treatment of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. (2020-11-20)

Study of hope and optimism: New paper examines research in emerging fields
A new paper published by the John Templeton Foundation explores the latest scientific and philosophical research on the related but distinct virtues of hope and optimism. The 45-page white paper, written by Michael Milona, a philosophy professor at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, examines findings on the benefits and risks involved in both hope and optimism. It examines projects by more than 29 researchers worldwide on topics related to the effects of hope and optimism in education, faith, healthcare, politics, and more. (2020-11-19)

Lovestruck by oxytocin! Novel roles of the hormone in controlling male sexual function
Hormones are the master regulators of sexual functions in mammals. The hormone oxytocin has a well-established role in social bonding, sexual function, maternal instinct, nursing, and lactation. Researchers from Okayama University have now explored the roles of oxytocin in male sexual function for the first time. Findings from the study suggest that oxytocin-mediated control of male sexual function via the spinal cord may in fact be instrumental in treating erectile dysfunction. (2020-11-18)

Health care workers most at risk for COVID-19
Health care workers -- particularly nurses -- have a higher prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection than non-health care workers, according to researchers at Rutgers, which released baseline results from a large prospective study of participants at Rutgers and affiliated hospitals recruited during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-16)

Media, NGO framing of climate change affects how people think about issue: studies
In a pair of studies, Hong Tien Vu of the University of Kansas found that the way media organizations and global climate change NGOs frame their messages on the topic does in fact influence how people look at the issue, which in turn affects what action, if any, is taken to fight the problem. (2020-11-16)

Are diagnostic imaging studies with positive conclusions or titles published faster?
According to the American Journal of Roentgenology, positive conclusions--but not titles--were associated with a shorter time from study completion to publication, which may contribute to an overrepresentation of positive results in the imaging diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) literature. Because an inflated perception of test performance could adversely influence clinical decision making and patient care, bias reduction strategies should undergo trials by both journal editors and researchers in the imaging DTA community. (2020-11-13)

Accuracy of rapid COVID test may be lower than previously suggested
The accuracy of a rapid finger-prick antibody test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for covid-19 infection, may be considerably lower than previously suggested, finds a study published by The BMJ. (2020-11-11)

Empathy and perspective taking: How social skills are built
Being able to feel empathy and to take in the other person's perspective are two abilities through which we understand what is going on in the other's mind. But it is still unclear what exactly they constitute. The Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences has now developed a model which explains what empathy and perspective taking are made of: It is not one specific competence rather than many individual factors that vary according to the situation. (2020-11-10)

Mindfulness interventions can change health behaviors -- integrated model helps to explain how they work
A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness of mindfulness approaches to promote positive changes in health behaviors. New neurobiologically based models of ''mindful self-regulation'' help to explain the how mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) work to help people make healthy behavior changes, according to a review in the November/December issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. (2020-11-10)

it's not if, but how people use social media that impacts their well-being
New research from UBC Okanagan indicates what's most important for overall happiness is how a person uses social media. Derrick Wirtz, an associate professor of teaching in psychology at the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, took a close look at how people use three major social platforms--Facebook, Twitter and Instagram--and how that use can impact a person's overall well-being. (2020-11-02)

Boosting the capacity of supercapacitors
Carefully designed covalent organic frameworks could make supercapacitor electrodes that have a greater ability to store electric charge. (2020-11-01)

Positive outlook predicts less memory decline
The happier we feel, the less likely we are to experience memory decline. (2020-10-29)

High rate of symptomless COVID-19 infection among grocery store workers
Grocery store employees are likely to be at heightened risk of COVID-19 infection, with those in customer-facing roles 5 times as likely to test positive as their colleagues in other positions, suggests the first study of its kind, published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine. (2020-10-29)

Study of COVID-19 levels in oncology staff suggests need for more extensive testing
A study of oncology staff carried out immediately after the spring peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK indicates that many had been infected with the coronavirus as they tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies. This included staff who did not show any symptoms. (2020-10-29)

Close to 17 percent of patients recovered from COVID-19 could still carry virus
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, presents new data that address important questions pertaining to the containment of the coronavirus pandemic: When should COVID-19 quarantine really end and which continuing symptoms may be more indicative of a positive test in recovered patients? Investigators report that close to 17 percent of patients considered fully recovered from COVID-19 tested positive for the virus in follow-up screening. (2020-10-28)

Brazilian youth's important role in fight against climate change - study
Marginalised young people in Brazilian cities can play an important role in responding to the threat of climate change, but youth engagement needs to be both 'playful' and take youth 'seriously' to support them in expressing their full potential in bringing about local change according to a new study. (2020-10-26)

Keeping the spark lit into the golden years
Have you passed your supposed prime and feel like it takes more to get fired up? The good news is you're far from alone. And you can do something about it. (2020-10-23)

Research shows aging chimps, like humans, value friendships
Chimpanzee and human friendships show many parallels, according to new research published this week in Science by associate professor Martin Muller at The University of New Mexico Anthropology department, associate professor of Anthropology and co-director of the Comparative Human and Primate Physiology Center Melissa Emery Thompson, and their colleagues. (2020-10-22)

Mass screening method could slash COVID-19 testing costs, trial finds
Using a new mathematical approach to screen large groups for COVID-19 could be around 20 times cheaper than individual testing, a study suggests. (2020-10-21)

Hot-button words trigger conservatives and liberals differently
Researchers have linked a brain region to what they call neural polarization, offering a glimpse into the partisan brain in the weeks leading up to what is arguably the most consequential U.S. presidential election in modern history. (2020-10-20)

Hesitancy about a COVID-19 vaccine is linked to beliefs about origin of the virus
More than a third of people (34%) in Turkey and one sixth of people (17%) in the UK are 'hesitant' about a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a study by UCL and Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey. (2020-10-19)

Newborn brains lack maturity to process emotions as adults do
Humans aren't born with mature brain circuitry that attaches emotions to the things they see or hear in their environment, a new study shows. Researchers studying brain scans of newborns found that the part of the brain involved in experiencing emotions isn't functionally connected in a mature way with the regions that process visual or auditory stimuli. (2020-10-19)

Malice leaves a nasty smell
Unhealthy behaviours trigger moral judgments that are similar to the basic emotions that contribute to our ability to survive. Two different hypotheses are to be found in the current scientific literature as to the identity of these emotions. After developing a new approach to brain imaging, a research team from the University of Geneva shows that unhealthy behaviours trigger brain responses that are similar to those prompted by bad smells. (2020-10-16)

Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
Discussions about immigration are heated, even antagonistic. But what happens when supporters and opponents undertake to show more empathy? A study carried out at the University of Geneva reveals that people who support immigration are ready and willing to adopt an empathetic approach and a wider perspective. By contrast, when opponents of immigration are asked to engage in perspective taking, they feel more competition with their ''adversary.'' (2020-10-14)

Stay in touch with your emotions to reduce pandemic-induced stress
The coronavirus has ushered in a lot of stress. A team of psychologists at the University of Iowa say people can reduce stress by identifying their emotions and taking mindful action to address them. The findings come from a national survey gauging how Americans are faring during the pandemic. (2020-10-14)

Watching nature on TV can boost wellbeing, finds new study
Watching high quality nature programmes on TV can uplift people's moods, reduce negative emotions, and help alleviate the kind of boredom associated with being isolated indoors. (2020-10-13)

Faster COVID-19 testing with simple algebraic equations
A mathematician from Cardiff University has developed a new method for processing large volumes of COVID-19 tests which he believes could lead to significantly more tests being performed at once and results being returned much quicker. (2020-10-07)

Same-gender couples interact better than heterosexual couples
Same-gender couples have higher-quality interactions with one another than heterosexual couples in Southern California, a new UC Riverside study finds. The study also holds that couples with two men have the smallest social networks. (2020-10-07)

Symptoms of COVID-19 are a poor marker of infection, new UK population study shows
86% of UK residents who tested positive for COVID-19 during lockdown did not have the specific virus symptoms (cough, and/or fever, and/or loss of taste/smell), finds a new study by UCL researchers. The authors say a more widespread testing programme is needed to catch 'silent' transmission and reduce future outbreaks. (2020-10-07)

Smartphone surveys find a connection between daily spiritual experiences and well-being
Using smartphone check-ins twice a day for two weeks, sociologists in a national study have found a link between individuals' daily spiritual experiences and overall well-being, say researchers from Baylor University and Harvard University. (2020-10-02)

Breast cancer medication risk
New research led by Flinders University has found a link between beta-blockers and survival outcomes in some breast cancer patients. Beta-blockers, commonly used to manage cardiovascular disease, were negatively associated with survival outcomes in patients with HER2 (Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2) positive advanced breast cancer, according to a new paper in the Frontiers In Oncology. (2020-09-29)

Social media use linked with depression, secondary trauma during COVID-19
Can't stop checking social media for the latest COVID-19 health information? You might want to take a break, according to researchers at Penn State and Jinan University who discovered that excessive use of social media for COVID-19 health information is related to both depression and secondary trauma. (2020-09-29)

VA Boston and BU researchers streamline PTSD diagnosis with machine learning
Now, researchers from the VA Boston Healthcare System and the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) have used machine learning to explore streamlining the ''gold standard'' diagnostic tool for PTSD. (2020-09-29)

Friendly interactions with Chinese people reduced COVID-19 prejudice
A new study finds that friendly interactions with Chinese people reduced Covid-19 prejudice as the virus hit the UK back in February. At the time, opinion polls suggested that one in three Brits already saw the virus as a personal threat and the British press were reporting a rise in hate crimes towards Chinese people. Researchers studied how UK residents felt towards the Chinese community as the pandemic reached our shores, and how these feelings might relate to British support for anti-Chinese policies. (2020-09-27)

COVID-19 spurs anxious, upsetting dreams
The anxiety, stress and worry brought on by COVID-19 is not limited to daytime hours. The pandemic is affecting our dreams as well, infusing more anxiety and negative emotions into dreams and spurring dreams about the virus itself, particularly among women, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-09-25)

Loving-kindness meditation will make you happier
Researchers from HSE University compared the effect of two meditation practices - loving-kindness meditation (LKM) and compassion meditation (CM). Loving-kindness meditation turned out to be more effective when it comes to increasing happiness, but, in contrast with previous studies, compassion meditation also did not result in a growth of negative emotions. The paper was published in Mindfulness journal. (2020-09-24)

Talking alone: Researchers use artificial intelligence tools to predict loneliness
A team led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine has used artificial intelligence technologies to analyze natural language patterns to discern degrees of loneliness in older adults. (2020-09-24)

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