Nav: Home

Current Positron emission tomography News and Events

Current Positron emission tomography News and Events, Positron emission tomography News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
A fast and precise look into fiber-reinforced composites
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have improved a method for small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to such an extent that it can now be used in the development or quality control of novel fiber-reinforced composites. (2019-11-12)
Chronic adversity dampens dopamine production
People exposed to a lifetime of psychosocial adversity may have an impaired ability to produce the dopamine levels needed for coping with acutely stressful situations. (2019-11-12)
Satellite observations show shifting trends in nitrogen oxide lifetimes over North American cities
For the first time, remote satellite observations are used to measure the lifetime of the urban air pollutants known as NOx above select major North American cities, showing how they've changed over time. (2019-11-07)
Aviation emissions' impacts on air quality larger than on climate, study finds
New research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has quantified the climate and air quality impacts of aviation, broken down by emission type, altitude and location. (2019-11-07)
China meets ultra-low emissions in advance of the 2020 goal
Scientists from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science (AMSS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), along with other collaborators, recently revealed that China's coal-fired power plants met ultra-low emission (ULE) standards ahead of schedule and also achieved substantial emission reductions between 2014 and 2017. (2019-11-05)
To monitor cancer therapy, Penn researchers tag CAR T cells with imaging markers
The researchers genetically engineered CAR T cells with molecular tags, which they were able to monitor in an animal model using position emission tomography (PET) imaging. (2019-11-05)
Flotillin is a novel diagnostic blood marker of Alzheimer's disease
Flotillin levels significantly decreased in the CSF and serum of AD patients compared with those of non-AD controls, respectively. (2019-11-04)
Just 15 years of post-Paris emissions to lock in 20 cm of sea level rise in 2300: study
Unless governments significantly scale up their emission reduction efforts, the 15 years' worth of emissions released under their current Paris Agreement pledges alone would cause 20 cm of sea-level rise over the longer term, according to new research published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by researchers at Climate Analytics and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK). (2019-11-04)
Skull dimensions of Dominicans and Haitians differ despite close physical proximity
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have conducted a craniometric study (measuring the main part of the skull) on understudied and marginalized groups and found that skull dimensions of Dominicans and Haitians, who occupy a relatively small island of Hispaniola, are different from each other. (2019-10-31)
Traffic exhaust at residential address increases the risk of stroke
High levels of traffic exhaust at one's residence increases the risk of stroke even in low-pollution environments, according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and other universities in Sweden. (2019-10-30)
Mitochondrial activity in lung tumors predicts response to drug inhibitor
Researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a new biomarker using a noninvasive imaging method that tracks mitochondrial activity in lung tumors. (2019-10-30)
OU-led study reveals dry season increase in photosynthesis in Amazon rain forest
A University of Oklahoma-led study demonstrated the potential of the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument on board the Copernicus Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite to measure and track chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis of tropical forests in the Amazon. (2019-10-21)
Study reveals how age affects perception of white LED light
Although LEDs are increasingly used in low-energy lighting and displays, consumers sometimes find their light harsh or unpleasant. (2019-10-16)
On the causes of regional haze
In recent years, the rampant haze in some cities and regions has attracted great attention, and people usually pay attention to the microscopic mechanism of its chemical process. (2019-10-15)
Single-particle spectroscopy of CsPbBr3 perovskite reveals the origin low electrolumine
Researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) used the method of single-particle spectroscopy to study electroluminescence in light-emitting devices. (2019-10-09)
PET offers more precise screening method to select candidates for radionuclide therapy
PET scanning can offer more precise selection of patients for neuroendocrine tumor therapy, allowing some patients to qualify who would otherwise have been ineligible, according to an article featured in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2019-10-08)
SUTD physicists unlock the mystery of thermionic emission in graphene
SUTD researchers discover a new theory that paves the way for the design of better graphene electronics and energy converters. (2019-10-07)
China is on track to meet its ultra-low emissions goals for 2020
Polluting emissions from Chinese thermal power plants declined significantly between 2014 and 2017, according to research involving UCL. (2019-10-07)
Study pinpoints Alzheimer's plaque emergence early and deep in the brain
By scanning whole brains of Alzheimer's model mice from an early age, researchers were able to precisely trace the terrible march of amyloid plaques from deep brain structures outward along specific circuits. (2019-10-04)
New imaging platform examines mechanisms behind coral bleaching
The non-invasive approach developed by Professors Vadim Backman and Luisa Marcelino could help marine biologists monitor coral health in the face of climate change. (2019-10-02)
Curbing diesel emission could reduce big city mortality
US cities could see a decline in mortality rates and an improved economy through midcentury if federal and local governments maintain stringent air pollution policies and diminish concentrations of diesel freight truck exhaust, according to Cornell University research. (2019-09-30)
MSU researchers lead team that observes exotic radioactive decay process
Researchers from the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University and TRIUMF have observed a rare nuclear decay. (2019-09-26)
Faster than ever -- neutron tomography detects water uptake by roots
The high-speed neutron tomography developed at HZB generates a complete 3D image every 1.5 seconds and is thus seven times faster than before. (2019-09-25)
A new member in AIE family
Three molecules based on tetraphenyl-1,3-butadienes (TPBs) showed aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics and sensitive conformational properties, in which the emission wavelengths could be changed in different states, attributed to the phenyl groups at the 4-position of the 1,3-butadienes. (2019-09-24)
West Africa: human-induced air pollution is higher than expected
Emissions of volatile organic pollutants in West Africa are 100 to 150 times higher than current estimates for the region. (2019-09-24)
UMass Amherst climate scientist contributes to IPCC session
This week, representatives of 195 member governments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are meeting in Monaco with dozens of climate scientists who have prepared a draft 'Summary for Policymakers' of their 'Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC).' UMass Amherst climate scientist Robert DeConto, one of the lead authors and contributor to the report, is there in the working plenary session and will be available for reporters and media to discuss findings after it is final. (2019-09-24)
Artificial materials reconstruct the porpoise's echolocation
Here, a study proposed a physical directional emission model to bridge the gap between porpoises' biosonar and artificial metamaterial. (2019-09-19)
Investments to address climate change are good business
New research suggests that over the next few decades, acting to reduce climate change is expected to cost much less than the damage otherwise inflicted by climate change on people, infrastructure and ecosystems. (2019-09-19)
Preventing climate change cheaper than dealing with its damage
World leaders need to urgently accelerate efforts to prevent 'profound, if not catastrophic' climate change in future, a distinguished group of scientists has warned. (2019-09-19)
UBC researchers design roadmap for hydrogen supply network
Researchers at the University of British Columbia have developed a hydrogen supply chain model that can enable the adoption of zero-emission, hydrogen-powered cars -- transforming them from a novelty into everyday transportation in just 30 years. (2019-09-12)
Elaborate Komodo dragon armor defends against other dragons
Just beneath their scales, Komodo dragons wear a suit of armor made of tiny bones. (2019-09-12)
Study offers verdict for China's efforts on coal emissions
Researchers from China, France and the USA have evaluated China's success in stemming emissions from its coal-fired power plants (CPPs). (2019-09-12)
Giant balloon-like structures discovered at center of Milky Way
An international team of astronomers, including Northwestern University's Farhad Yusef-Zadeh, has discovered one of the largest structures ever observed in the Milky Way. (2019-09-11)
Towering balloon-like features discovered near centre of the Milky Way
An international team of astronomers including members from the University of Oxford, has discovered one of the largest features ever observed in the center of the Milky Way: a pair of enormous radio-emitting bubbles that tower hundreds of light-years above and below the central region of our galaxy. (2019-09-11)
Towering balloon-like features discovered near center of the Milky Way
An international team of astronomers has discovered one of the largest features ever observed in the center of the Milky Way -- a pair of enormous radio-emitting bubbles that tower hundreds of light-years above and below the central region of our galaxy. (2019-09-11)
Brain changes may help track dementia, even before diagnosis
Even before a dementia diagnosis, people with mild cognitive impairment may have different changes in the brain depending on what type of dementia they have, according to a study published in the September 11, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-09-11)
Decrease in greenhouse gas emissions linked to Soviet Union's collapse
As the authors posit, the collapse of the Soviet Union led to decreasing meat product consumption, abandonment of cultivated land, and restructuring of food sales chains; which, in turn, elicited a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. (2019-09-05)
Future of LEDs Gets Boost from Verification of Localization States in InGaN Quantum Wells
LEDs made of indium gallium nitride provide better luminescence efficiency than many of the other materials used to create blue and green LEDs, but a big challenge of working with InGaN is its known dislocation density defects that make it difficult to understand its emission properties. (2019-09-04)
Graphene layer enables advance in super-resolution microscopy
Researchers at Göttingen University developed a new method that uses the unusual properties of graphene to interact with fluorescing molecules. (2019-09-03)
Changes in ice volume control seabed methane emissions
New research shows that episodes of methane emission from the seabed off western Svalbard correlate with changing ice volumes in the Arctic. (2019-08-29)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.