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Current Precipitation News and Events

Current Precipitation News and Events, Precipitation News Articles.
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Warmer temperatures slow COVID-19 transmission, but not by much
Researchers at Mount Auburn Hospital looked at the impact of temperature, precipitation, and UV index on COVID-19 case rates in the United States during the spring months of 2020. (2020-06-01)
Volcanic eruptions reduce global rainfall
POSTECH Professor Seung-Ki Min's joint research team identifies the mechanism behind the reduction in precipitation after volcanic eruptions. (2020-05-27)
Researchers uncover the arks of genetic diversity in terrestrial mammals
Mapping the distribution of life on Earth, from genes to species to ecosystems, is essential in informing conservation policies and protecting biodiversity. (2020-05-22)
But it's a dry heat: Climate change and the aridification of North America
Discussions of drought often center on the lack of precipitation. (2020-05-19)
El Niño-linked decreases in soil moisture could trigger massive tropical-plant die offs
New research has found that El Niño events are often associated with droughts in some of the world's more vulnerable tropical regions. (2020-05-11)
Study shows wetter climate is likely to intensify global warming
New study indicates the increase in rainfall forecast by global climate models is likely to hasten the release of carbon dioxide from tropical soils, further intensifying global warming by adding to human emissions of this greenhouse gas into Earth's atmosphere. (2020-05-06)
Using cloud-precipitation relationship to estimate cloud water path of mature tropical cyclones
Scientists find the cloud water path of mature tropical cyclones can be estimated by a notable sigmoid function of near-surface rain rate. (2020-04-27)
The cause of the red coloration in stalagmites
A study by the UPV/EHU confirms the cause of the mysterious red colour of the stalagmites in the Goikoetxe Cave located in the Urdaibai Biosphere Reserve, and its potential use as an indicator of palaeoclimate changes on the Cantabrian seaboard between 7,000 and 5,000 years ago. (2020-04-27)
Study suggests rainfall triggered 2018 Kīlauea eruption
In May 2018 Kīlauea volcano on the island of Hawaii erupted, touching off months of intense activity. (2020-04-22)
NASA finds Tropical Storm Jeruto's displaced rainfall
NASA analyzed weakening Tropical Storm Jeruto's rainfall and found one small area of moderate rainfall displaced from the center, because of strong wind shear. (2020-04-16)
NASA observes rainfall from tornado-spawning storms in the southern US
For two days in mid-April, severe storms raced through the southern U.S. and NASA created an animation using satellite data to show the movement and strength of those storms. (2020-04-15)
Precipitation will be essential for plants to counteract global warming
A new Columbia Engineering study shows that increased water stress--higher frequency of drought due to higher temperatures, is going to constrain the phenological cycle: in effect, by shutting down photosynthesis, it will generate a lower carbon uptake at the end of the season, thus contributing to increased global warming. (2020-04-13)
NASA continues tracking Tropical Cyclone Harold's excessive rainfall
powerful Tropical Cyclone Harold from the Solomon Islands to the island of Tonga in the South Pacific. (2020-04-09)
NASA finds very heavy rainfall in major tropical cyclone Harold
On April 8, Tropical Cyclone Harold is a major hurricane, a Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, as it exits Fiji and heads toward the island of Tonga. (2020-04-08)
NASA finds Tropical Storm Irondro's heavy rainfall displaced
NASA analyzed Tropical Storm Irondro's rainfall and found heaviest rainfall was being pushed far southeast of the center because of strong wind shear. (2020-04-06)
NASA finds heavy rainfall in powerful tropical cyclone Harold
One of NASA's satellites that can measure the rate in which rainfall is occurring in storms passed over powerful Tropical Cyclone Harold just after it made landfall in Vanuatu in the Southern Pacific Ocean. (2020-04-06)
Changes to drylands with future climate change
While drylands around the world will expand at an accelerated rate because of future climate change, their average productivity will likely be reduced, according to a new study. (2020-04-03)
Plants and animals aren't so different when it comes to climate
A new study reveals that plants and animals are remarkably similar in their responses to changing environmental conditions across the globe, which may help explain how they are distributed today and how they will respond to climate change in the future. (2020-03-24)
Limited nuclear war could have big impact on world food supplies
A war between India and Pakistan using less than 1% of nuclear weapons worldwide could lead to the worst global food losses in modern history, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that is the first of its kind. (2020-03-16)
Fall precipitation predicts abundance of curly top disease and guides weed management
Transmitted by an insect known as the beet leafhopper, curly top disease is a viral disease affecting many crops, including melons, peppers, sugar beets, and tomatoes. (2020-03-12)
More accurate climate change model reveals bleaker outlook on electricity, water use
A model developed by Purdue University researchers more accurately captures how climate change will impact electricity and water use. (2020-03-05)
Complex local conditions keep fields of dunes from going active all at once
New research on sand dunes in China describes how even neighboring dunes can long remain in different and seemingly conflicting states -- confounding the assessment of stabilization efforts and masking the effects of climate change. (2020-02-26)
Seeds in Tibet face impacts from climate change
A new study published in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications examines how warming and increased precipitation (rain and snow) harms the seeds in the ground of the Tibetan Plateau and elsewhere. (2020-02-25)
Let it snow: Researchers put cloud seeding to the test
Cloud seeding has become an increasingly popular practice in the western United States, where states grapple with growing demands for water. (2020-02-24)
UW researchers contribute to quantifiable observation of cloud seeding
Scientists found that cloud seeding in the Idaho mountains produced a total of about 235 Olympic-sized swimming pools' worth of water. (2020-02-24)
Colorado river flow dwindles due to loss of reflective snowpack
Due to the disappearance of its sunlight-reflecting seasonal snowpack, the Colorado River Basin is losing more water to evaporation than can be replaced by precipitation, researchers report. (2020-02-20)
Climate change could trigger more landslides in High Mountain Asia
More frequent and intense rainfall events due to climate change could cause more landslides in the High Mountain Asia region of China, Tibet and Nepal, according to the first quantitative study of the link between precipitation and landslides in the region. (2020-02-11)
Forest soils recovering from effects of acid rain
Study shows improvement of soils and streams in the southern Appalachians. (2020-02-05)
Mountain vegetation dries out Alpine water fluxes
ETH researchers confirm the paradox: rather than withering during droughts, plants at higher elevations absolutely thrive, as a study just published in the journal Nature Climate Change shows. (2020-01-29)
More rain and less snow means increased flood risk
By analyzing more than two decades of data in the western US, scientists have shown that flood sizes increase exponentially as a higher fraction of precipitation falls as rain, offering insight into how flood risks may change in a warming world with less snow. (2020-01-27)
The skin of the earth is home to pac-man-like protists
The most common groups of soil protists behave exactly like Pac-Man: moving through the soil matrix, gobbling up bacteria according to a new article in Science Advances. (2020-01-24)
Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events
Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity and density that are paralleled by losses in an important ecosystem service: biocontrol of herbivores by parasitoids. (2020-01-21)
Scientists explain how leaf apex enhances water drainage
Chinese scientists from the Technical Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have recently shown how the tiny apex structure in plant leaves controls water drainage and confers an evolutionary advantage. (2020-01-15)
No need to dig too deep to find gold!
Why are some porphyry deposits rich in copper while others contain gold? (2020-01-14)
Widespread droughts affect southern California water sources six times a century
A University of Arizona-led study used the annual growth rings of trees to reconstruct a long-term climate history and examine the duration and frequency of ''perfect droughts'' in Southern California's main water sources. (2020-01-13)
Toward a smarter way of recharging the aquifer
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis have solved a mystery: how did arsenic show up in aquifer water that had been triple purified? (2020-01-09)
The start of biological spring in Africa is linked to the quantity of hours of sunshine
The start of the increase in the verdure of vegetation (equivalent to the start of spring) in Africa is directly connected to the amount of hours of sunshine a day, that is to say the it would be the 'photoperiod' which controls this process and not the arrival of the first rains, as was believed until now. (2020-01-08)
Research shows increased sediment flux in the Yangtze river headwater
Sediment flux (SF) in the Tuotuo River on the central Tibetan Plateau (TP), considered the main headwater of the Yangtze River, has significantly increased over the past three decades, according to new research led by scientists from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2019-12-19)
Limiting global warming would relieve populations from wet and dry extremes in China
Scientists find that heavy precipitation events would intensify with global warming all over China, affecting all the populations around. (2019-12-17)
Model simulation experiments give scientists a clearer understanding of factors that influence monsoon behavior
The Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System (FGOALS-f3-L) model datasets prepared for the sixth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6) Global Monsoons Model Intercomparison Project (GMMIP) provide a valuable tool to assess sea surface temperature trends and its influence on monsoon circulation and precipitation patterns, while also providing a clearer understanding of how topography can affect the global monsoon system as it passes over landscapes with high altitudes. (2019-12-12)
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