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Current Predators News and Events

Current Predators News and Events, Predators News Articles.
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About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet
Large open-water fish predators such as tunas or sharks hunt for prey more intensively in the temperate zone than near the equator. (2020-04-01)
When warblers warn of cowbirds, blackbirds get the message
This is the story of three bird species and how they interact. (2020-03-31)
International team discover new species of flying reptiles
A community of flying reptiles that inhabited the Sahara 100 million years ago has been discovered by a University of Portsmouth palaeontologist and an international team of scientists. (2020-03-26)
Fossil finds give clues about flying reptiles in the Sahara 100 million years ago
Three new species of toothed pterosaurs -- flying reptiles of the Cretaceous period, some 100 million years ago -- have been identified in Africa by an international team of scientists led by Baylor University. (2020-03-25)
A small forage fish should command greater notice, researchers say
A slender little fish called the sand lance plays a big role as 'a quintessential forage fish' for puffins, terns and other seabirds, humpback whales and other marine mammals, and even bigger fish such as Atlantic sturgeon, cod and bluefin tuna in the Gulf of Maine and northwest Atlantic Ocean. (2020-03-25)
Vibes before it bites: 10 types of defensive behaviour for the false coral snake
The False Coral Snake (Oxyrhopus rhombifer) may be capable of recognising various threat levels and demonstrates ten different defensive behaviours, seven of which are registered for the first time for the species. (2020-03-23)
'Fatal attraction': Small carnivores drawn to kill sites, then ambushed by larger kin
University of Washington researchers have discovered that large predators play a key yet unexpected role in keeping smaller predators and deer in check. (2020-03-18)
Banded mongoose study reveals how its environment influences the spread of infectious disease
A new study led by Kathleen Alexander explores the ways that landscapes can influence animal behavior, fostering dynamics that either encourage or limit the spread of infectious diseases. (2020-03-12)
Keeping cats indoors could blunt adverse effects to wildlife
A new study shows that hunting by house cats can have big effects on local animal populations because they kill more prey, in a given area, than similar-sized wild predators. (2020-03-11)
Ship noise hampers crab camouflage
Colour-changing crabs struggle to camouflage themselves when exposed to noise from ships, new research shows. (2020-03-09)
Dragonflies are efficient predators
A study led by the University of Turku, Finland, has found that small, fiercely predatory damselflies catch and eat hundreds of thousands of insects during a single summer -- in an area surrounding just a single pond. (2020-03-03)
Whether horseradish flea beetles deter predators depends on their food plant and their life stage
Horseradish flea beetles use glucosinolates from their host plants for their own defense. (2020-03-02)
Male-killing bugs hold key to butterflies' curious color changes
An international team of researchers have shed new light on the complex reproductive process which dictates that only female offspring of the Danaus chrysippus survive -- all in close proximity to Kenya's capital, Nairobi. (2020-02-28)
Male-killing bacteria linked to butterfly color changes
Like many poisonous animals, the African monarch butterfly's orange, white and black pattern warns predators that it is toxic. (2020-02-28)
USU herpetologist reports surprising evolutionary shift in snakes
A multi-national team of scientists reports a case of a vertebrate predator switching from a vertebrate prey to an invertebrate prey for the selective advantage of obtaining the same chemical class of defensive toxins. (2020-02-24)
Watching TV helps birds make better food choices
By watching videos of each other eating, blue tits and great tits can learn to avoid foods that taste disgusting and are potentially toxic, a new study has found. (2020-02-20)
The paradox of dormancy: Why sleep when you can eat?
Why do predators sometimes lay dormant eggs -- eggs which are hardy, but take a long time to hatch, and are expensive to produce? (2020-02-15)
University of Montana researchers study how birds retweet news
Every social network has its fake news. And in animal communication networks, even birds discern the trustworthiness of their neighbors, a study from the University of Montana suggests. (2020-02-14)
Boom and bust for ancient sea dragons
A new study by scientists from the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, shows a well-known group of extinct marine reptiles had an early burst in their diversity and evolution - but that a failure to adapt in the long-run may have led to their extinction. (2020-02-13)
The demise of tropical snakes, an 'invisible' outcome of biodiversity loss
That tropical amphibian populations have been crippled by the chytrid fungus is well-known, but a new study linking this loss to an 'invisible' decline of tropical snake communities suggests that the permeating impacts of the biodiversity crisis are not as apparent. (2020-02-13)
Climate warming disrupts tree seed production
Research involving the University of Liverpool has revealed the effect of climate warming on the complex interactions between tree masting and the insects that eat their seeds. (2020-02-12)
Predators to spare
In 2014, a disease of epidemic proportions gripped the West Coast of the US. (2020-02-12)
Orb-weaver spiders' yellow and black pattern helps them lure prey
Being inconspicuous might seem the best strategy for spiders to catch potential prey in their webs, but many orb-web spiders, which hunt in this way, are brightly coloured. (2020-02-11)
Mediterranean sea urchins are more vulnerable than previously thought
The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, an eatable species of great commercial interest found in the Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic, is more vulnerable than so far believed. (2020-02-07)
One single primitive turtle resisted mass extinction in the northern hemisphere
Sixty-six million years ago, in the emerged lands of Laurasia -now the northern hemisphere- a primitive land tortoise, measuring about 60 cm, managed to survive the event that killed the dinosaurs. (2020-02-03)
Tougher start could help captive-bred game birds
Tougher early lives could help captive-bred game birds develop survival skills for adulthood in the wild, new research suggests. (2020-01-29)
Brilliant iridescence can conceal as well as attract
A new study shows for the first time that the striking iridescent colours seen in some animals increase their chances of survival against predators by acting as a means of camouflage. (2020-01-23)
Even after death, animals are important in ecosystems
Animal carcasses play an important role in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. (2020-01-22)
Global study finds predators are most likely to be lost when habitats are converted for human use
A first of its kind, global study on the impacts of human land-use on different groups of animals has found that predators, especially small invertebrates like spiders and ladybirds, are the most likely to be lost when natural habitats are converted to agricultural land or towns and cities. (2020-01-21)
Cave fights for food: Voracious spiders vs. assassin bugs
Killing and eating of potential competitors has rarely been documented in the zoological literature, even though this type of interaction can affect population dynamics. (2020-01-20)
Human-caused biodiversity decline started millions of years ago
The human-caused biodiversity decline started much earlier than researchers used to believe. (2020-01-17)
Animals should use short, fast movements to avoid being located
Most animals need to move, whether this is to seek out food, shelter or a mate. (2020-01-15)
Cat parasite reduces general anxiety in infected mice, not just fear of feline predators
The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause infected rodents to lose their fear of feline predators, which makes them easier to catch. (2020-01-14)
Animals reduce the symmetry of their markings to improve camouflage
Some forms of camouflage have evolved in animals to exploit a loophole in the way predators perceive their symmetrical markings. (2020-01-14)
Double-checking the science
Biologists help debunk previous studies that say tropical fish are behaving oddly as oceans gets more acidic due to climate change. (2020-01-08)
Researchers united on international road map to insect recovery
It's no secret that many insects are struggling worldwide. But we could fix these insects' problems, according to more than 70 scientists from 21 countries. (2020-01-06)
Stanford study finds whales use stealth to feed on fish
Researchers combined field studies, lab experiments and modeling to figure out how whales manage to capture fish. (2019-12-23)
Permanent predator-prey oscillations
Predator-prey cycles are among the fundamental phenomena of ecological systems. (2019-12-20)
Predatory lacewings do not care whether their prey detoxifies plant defenses or not
A new study shows that herbivores and their predators have evolved efficient strategies to deal with toxic plant secondary metabolites. (2019-12-19)
Perpetual predator-prey population cycles
How can predators coexist with their prey over long periods without the predators completely depleting the resource that keeps them alive? (2019-12-18)
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