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Current Predators News and Events

Current Predators News and Events, Predators News Articles.
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The recent spread of coyotes across North America did not doom deer populations
Coyotes eat deer, but not enough to limit the deer population at a large scale. (2019-03-20)
New SDSU study examines role of sea urchins on California kelp
California sheephead and spiny lobsters may be helping control sea urchin populations in Southern California kelp forests, where sea otters -- a top urchin predator -- have long been missing, according to a new San Diego State University (SDSU) study published in the journal Ecology. (2019-03-14)
Hungry moose more tolerant of wolves' presence
Research in western Wyoming shows that close proximity of wolves does cause moose to move, but not enough to drive them from their preferred habitats -- especially late in the winter. (2019-03-13)
Mowing for monarchs
You might think that mowing fields wouldn't benefit monarch butterfly populations. (2019-03-12)
New study explores impacts of marine and freshwater predators on ecosystems and society
A new study from a team of leading scientists reports on the diverse ways that aquatic predators, such as sharks and alligators, can impact ecosystems and also benefit human society. (2019-03-11)
New study informs debate on predator-prey relationships
Experts have shed new light on the relationship between predators and their prey after studying how elk responded to the risk posed by grey wolves in an American national park. (2019-03-07)
Landscapes of fear, and the large carnivores they feature, important in African ecosystems
A new study focused on Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, where entire populations of large-mammal predators were nearly extinguished during the Mozambican Civil War, illustrates how the loss of an ecosystem's top carnivores can have far-reaching consequences for prey and plant populations, turning 'landscapes of fear' into 'landscapes of fearlessness' in which emboldened herbivores graze and suppress plants. (2019-03-07)
Ecologists find a 'landscape of fearlessness' in a war-torn savannah
Using a series of well-designed experiments in Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, a Princeton-led research team confirmed each step in a trophic cascade between the elimination of predators (including leopards, African wild dogs, and hyenas) and growth of local plants. (2019-03-07)
Disrupting wolf movement may be more effective at protecting caribou
Researchers used motion-triggered cameras to capture photographs of wolves, caribou, and other wildlife species in the Canadian Oil Sands to study the habitat use patterns of these animals and test management strategies aimed at reducing the impacts of the linear developments on caribou. (2019-03-06)
Dingoes should remain a distinct species in Australia
Since the arrival of British settlers over 230 years ago, most Australians have assumed dingoes are a breed of wild dog. (2019-03-05)
Motion cameras more effective than fences and wolf culling at saving caribou
New research suggests there may be more effective and less invasive strategies to reduce the ability of wolves to encounter caribou: motion-triggered cameras capture photographs of wolves, caribou, and other wildlife species in the Canadian Oil Sands to study the habitat use patterns of the animals and test management strategies aimed at reducing the impacts of the linear developments on caribou. (2019-03-05)
U-M biologists capture super-creepy photos of Amazon spiders making meals of frogs, lizards
Warning to arachnophobes and the faint of heart: This is the stuff of nightmares, so you might want to proceed with caution. (2019-02-28)
Put eggs all in one basket, or spread them around? Birds know best
A species of Central American cuckoo, the greater ani, forms groups of two or three females that nest communally to protect their eggs from predators, but sometimes a female will go outside the communal group and lay an egg in an outsider's nest. (2019-02-27)
Jumping spider mimics two kinds of ants as it grows
Spiders that pretend to be ants to fool predators have an unusual problem when it comes to sex. (2019-02-27)
Return of the wolves: How deer escape tactics help save their lives
As gray wolves return to Washington state, a new study finds that one species of deer is changing its behavior to spend more time away from roads, at higher elevations and in rockier landscapes. (2019-02-27)
Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock
Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows. (2019-02-26)
Pink or brown?
They're neither white and gold or black and blue. But in an optical puzzle akin to The Dress, colourful snails are causing scientists at the University of Nottingham to turn to technology to definitively decide whether some snails' shells are pink or brown. (2019-02-25)
A tasty Florida butterfly turns sour
A 15-year study led by University of Arizona entomologist Katy Prudic found that, when living apart from the unsavory bug it mimics, the viceroy butterfly becomes yucky, making biologists rethink old theories about animal mimicry. (2019-02-22)
New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex
A newly discovered, diminutive -- by T. rex standards -- relative of the tyrant king of dinosaurs reveals crucial new information about when and how T. rex came to rule the North American roost. (2019-02-21)
'Seeing' tails help sea snakes avoid predators
New research has revealed the fascinating adaptation of some Australian sea snakes that helps protect their vulnerable paddle-shaped tails from predators. (2019-02-15)
You are what you eat: A color-changing insect modifies diet to become distasteful
When young spotted lanternflies grow they become brightly red. Around this time, they also begin to feed almost exclusively on the tree of heaven, from which they suck bitter juices into their bodies. (2019-02-08)
Study finds experimental extreme draining of reservoir has unexpected ecological impacts
The experimental extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon to aid downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon is showing benefits but also a mix of unintended consequences, including changing the aquatic food web and releasing potential predators downstream. (2019-02-07)
Solving the mystery of Serengeti's vanishing wild dogs
More than 25 years ago, African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) disappeared from Serengeti National Park. (2019-01-31)
Road proximity may boost songbird nest success in tropics
In the world's temperate regions, proximity to roads usually reduces the reproductive success of birds, thanks to predators that gravitate toward habitat edges. (2019-01-29)
Anemones are friends to fish
Any port in a storm, any anemone for a small fish trying to avoid being a predator's dinner. (2019-01-29)
How sponges undermine coral reefs from within
Coral reefs are demolished from within, by bio-eroding sponges. Seeking refuge from predators, these sponges bore tunnels into the carbonate coral structures, thus weakening the reefs. (2019-01-25)
It's a bird-eat-bird world
Baby birds and eggs are on the menu for at least 94 species of animals in Australia's forests and woodlands, according to new research from the University of Queensland. (2019-01-24)
In polar regions, warm-blooded marine predators rule
Even though diversity typically decreases from the tropics to the poles, in the frigid waters of the high latitudes, warm-blooded marine mammals and birds thrive, both in number and species richness. (2019-01-24)
Crocodiles have complex past
A new study offers a different version to the evolutionary past of modern-day crocodiles and alligators. (2019-01-24)
Scientists identify toxic antipredator defense mechanism in locusts
A team of scientists led by Prof. KANG Le at the Institute of Zoology reported an unprecedented animal defense mechanism by which an olfactory aposematic (warning) signal can be converted to a hypertoxic chemical to facilitate an antipredator defense in locusts. (2019-01-24)
Illinois team helping to unravel the mysteries of the hagfish's slimy defense
The hagfish dates back at least 300 million years. The secret of survival for these eel-like sea creatures can be found in the rate and volume of slime it produces to fend off predators. (2019-01-22)
'Outdated' management plan increases risks to Alaska's large carnivores
Alaskan wildlife management that prioritizes reducing bear and wolf populations so hunters can kill more moose, caribou and deer is both backward and lacks scientific monitoring. (2019-01-15)
Murky water keeps fish on edge
A study led by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University found fish become anxious and more cautious when water quality is degraded by sediment, an effect that could stunt their growth and damage their health. (2019-01-09)
Who's tougher? Baby sharks or daddy sharks?
One would assume that since humans and many animals tend to get stiffer and perhaps tougher as they reach adulthood, the same would be true for sharks. (2019-01-03)
Camera trap study reveals the hidden lives of island carnivores
Researchers placed 160 cameras on 19 of the 22 Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin to see which carnivores were living there. (2018-12-21)
New insights on animal movement in fire-prone landscapes
A new Biological Reviews article considers how fire histories affect animals' movement and shape the distribution of species. (2018-12-19)
Social animals have more parasite infections but lower infection-related costs
Animals living in large groups tend to have more parasites than less social animals do, but according to a new study in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, they may also be better protected from the negative effects of those parasites. (2018-12-19)
Lower oxygen levels to impact the oceanic food chain
The North Pacific Ocean is losing oxygen, pushing species significant to the marine ecosystem to shallower water where there's more sunlight, higher temperatures and greater risk of predators. (2018-12-19)
URI researchers: Small changes in oxygen levels have big implications for ocean life
Oceanographers at the University of Rhode Island have found that even slight levels of ocean oxygen loss, or deoxygenation, have big consequences for tiny marine organisms called zooplankton. (2018-12-19)
Salmon may lose the ability to smell danger as carbon emissions rise
New research shows that the powerful sense of smell Pacific salmon rely on for migration, finding food and avoiding predators might be in trouble as carbon emissions continue to be absorbed by the ocean. (2018-12-18)
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