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Current Predators News and Events

Current Predators News and Events, Predators News Articles.
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Guppies teach us why evolution happens
New study on guppies shows that animals evolve in response the the environment they create in the absence of predators, rather than in response to the risk of being eaten. (2019-09-18)
Ecologists find strong evidence of fishing down the food web in freshwater lake
Research by ecologists at the University of Toronto and Ontario's Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry shows strong evidence in a freshwater lake of ''fishing down the food web'' - the deliberate shift away from top predatory fish on the food chain to smaller species closer to the base. (2019-09-18)
International scientists shed new light on demise of two extinct New Zealand songbirds
They may not have been seen for the past 50 and 110 years, but an international study into their extinction has provided answers to how the world lost New Zealand's South Island kokako and huia. (2019-09-03)
Toxic frogs with weak defenses persist in the gene pool alongside stronger competitors
A multi-national team of evolutionary biologists investigated how two types of poison frog co-exist when we expect only one. (2019-09-02)
Crouching lion, hidden giraffe
The behavior of giraffe groups with calves is influenced more strongly by the risk of predators than is the behavior of all-adult groups, which is mostly determined by the availability of food. (2019-08-29)
Separate polarization and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators
Fiddler crabs see the polarization of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or a predator. (2019-08-21)
Decades-old puzzle of the ecology of soil animals solved
An international research team led by the University of Goettingen has deciphered the defence mechanism of filamentous fungi. (2019-08-20)
Fear of predators causes PTSD-like changes in brains of wild animals
A new study by Western University demonstrates that the fear predators inspire can leave long-lasting traces in the neural circuitry of wild animals and induce enduringly fearful behaviour, comparable to effects seen in PTSD research. (2019-08-07)
Industrial fishing behind plummeting shark numbers
A team of researchers, led by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), has discovered that sharks are much rarer in habitats nearer large human populations and fish markets. (2019-08-06)
Intense look at La Brea Tar Pits explains why we have coyotes, not saber-toothed cats
The most detailed study to date of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits is helping Americans understand why today we're dealing with coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off. (2019-08-05)
Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators
Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. (2019-08-02)
Caterpillars of the peppered moth perceive color through their skin
It is difficult to distinguish caterpillars of the peppered moth from a twig. (2019-08-02)
For anemonefish, male-to-female sex change happens first in the brain
The anemonefish is a gender-bending marvel. It starts out as a male, but can switch to female when circumstances allow, for example, when the only female present dies or disappears. (2019-07-23)
Predators' fear of humans ripples through wildlife communities, emboldening rodents
Giving credence to the saying, 'While the cat's away, the mice will play,' a new study indicates that pumas and medium-sized carnivores lie low when they sense the presence of humans, which frees up the landscape for rodents to forage more brazenly. (2019-07-17)
Spawn of the triffid? Tiny organisms give us glimpse into complex evolutionary tale
Two newly discovered organisms point to the existence of an ancient organism that resembled a tiny version of the lumbering, human-eating science fiction plants known as 'triffids,' according to research in Nature. (2019-07-17)
Effectiveness of using natural enemies to combat pests depends on surroundings
A new study of cabbage crops in New York -- a state industry worth close to $60 million in 2017, according to the USDA -- reports for the first time that the effectiveness of releasing natural enemies to combat pests depends on the landscape surrounding the field. (2019-07-15)
Fear of predators increases risk of illness
Predators are not only a deadly threat to many animals, they also affect potential prey negatively simply by being nearby. (2019-07-09)
Insects need empathy
In February, environmentalists in Germany collected 1.75 million signatures for a 'save the bees law.' Citizens can stop insect declines by halting habitat loss and fragmentation, producing food without pesticides and limiting climate change, say the authors of this Perspectives piece in Science. (2019-06-27)
How the dragon got its frill
The frilled dragon exhibits a distinctive large erectile ruff. Researchers (UNIGE and SIB) report that an ancestral embryonic gill of the dragon embryo turns into a neck pocket that expands and folds, forming the frill. (2019-06-25)
Parental care has forced great crested grebes to lay eggs with an eye on seagulls
Ornithologists from St Petersburg University, Elmira Zaynagutdinova and Yuriy Mikhailov, studied the features of the great crested grebes (Podiceps cristatus) nesting in the nature reserve 'North Coast of the Neva Bay'. (2019-06-21)
Biting backfire: Some mosquitoes actually benefit from pesticide application
The common perception that pesticides reduce or eliminate target insect species may not always hold. (2019-06-17)
No evidence for increased egg predation in the Arctic
Climate and ecosystems are changing, but predation on shorebird nests has changed little across the globe over the past 60 years, finds an international team of 60 researchers. (2019-06-14)
New 'king' of fossils discovered in Australia
Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. (2019-06-13)
Secondhand horror: Indirect predator odor triggers reproductive changes in bank voles
The study of University of Jyväskylä and University of Vienna shows that voles are able to determine the difference between the smell of a predator, the smell of a non-stressed vole, and the smell of a vole who encountered a predator. (2019-06-13)
What's your poison? Scrupulous scorpions tailor venom to target
Replenishing venom takes time and energy -- so it pays to be stingy with stings. (2019-06-10)
U of G researchers discover meat-eating plant in Ontario, Canada
Pitcher plants growing in wetlands across Canada have long been known to eat creatures -- mostly insects and spiders -- that fall into their bell-shaped leaves and decompose in rainwater collected there. (2019-06-07)
New model predicts impact of invasive lionfish predators on coral reefs
A new model is providing insight into the impact of invasive lionfish on coral reefs in the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. (2019-06-06)
To see how invading predators change an ecosystem, watch the prey, say researchers
To study the impacts of invading predators, a Princeton-led team used three lizard species: one curly-tailed predator and two prey species, green and brown anoles. (2019-06-05)
Some songbird nests are especially vulnerable to magpie predation
A new study has revealed a range of factors that cause a variation in predation by magpies on farmland songbirds. (2019-05-29)
How language developed: Comprehension learning precedes vocal production
Green monkeys' alarm calls allow conclusions about the evolution of language. (2019-05-27)
How to prevent mosquitofish from spreading in water ecosystems
Preventing the introduction of the mosquitofish and removing its population are the most effective actions to control the dispersal of this exotic fish in ponds and lakes, according to a study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. (2019-05-24)
Surprise: The survival of coral reefs hinges on the hidden lives of the sea's tiniest fishes
The survival of coral reef ecosystems and their menagerie of rainbowed residents relies on seldom seen, historically overlooked cryptobenthic reef fishes -- the smallest of marine vertebrates. (2019-05-23)
Parasites dampen beetle's fight or flight response
Beetles infected with parasitic worms put up less of a fight against simulated attacks from predators and rival males, according to a study by Felicia Ebot-Ojong, Andrew Davis and Elizabeth Jurado at the University of Georgia, USA, publishing May 22, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2019-05-22)
Penguins and their chicks' responses to local fish numbers informs marine conservation
Endangered penguins respond rapidly to changes in local fish numbers, and monitoring them could inform fisheries management and marine conservation. (2019-05-21)
The return of the wolves
Researchers examine global strategies for dealing with predators. (2019-05-20)
Size is everything
The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped. (2019-05-20)
The bird that came back from the dead
New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a rare process called 'iterative evolution'. (2019-05-09)
Lions vs. porcupines
Lions can bring down wildebeests and giraffes, but when they try to hunt porcupines, the spiky rodents often come out on top. (2019-05-07)
Study shows birds use social cues to make decisions
A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that some birds prioritize social information over visual evidence when making breeding choices. (2019-05-02)
Why can't we all get along (like Namibia's pastoralists and wildlife?)
Scientists interviewed pastoralists in Namibia's Namib Desert to see how they felt about conflicts with wildlife, which can include lions and cheetahs preying on livestock and elephants and zebras eating crops. (2019-05-02)
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