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'Fang'tastic: researchers report amphibians with snake-like dental glands
Utah State University biologist Edmund 'Butch' Brodie, Jr. and colleagues from Brazil's Butantan Institute describe oral glands in a family of terrestrial caecilians, serpent-like amphibians related to frogs and salamanders. (2020-07-03)
Research reveals fishing pressures affect tropical and temperate reefs differentl
In a study published recently in Ecology and Evolution, an international team of researchers focused on what can happen to ocean ecosystems when fishing pressure increases or decreases, and how this differs between tropical to temperate marine ecosystems. (2020-06-30)
Bugs resort to several colours to protect themselves from predators
New research has revealed for the first time that shield bugs use a variety of colours throughout their lives to avoid predators. (2020-06-25)
Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?
New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals. (2020-06-24)
Sunnier but riskier
Conservation efforts that open up the canopy of overgrown habitat for threatened timber rattlesnakes are beneficial to snakes but could come at a cost, according to a new study. (2020-06-24)
Size matters in the sex life of salmon
For Atlantic salmon, size matters when it comes to love. (2020-06-23)
Fish evolution in action: Land fish forced to adapt after leap out of water
Many blennies - a remarkable family of fishes - evolved from an aquatic 'jack of all trades' to a 'master of one' upon the invasion of land, a new study led by UNSW scientists has shown. (2020-06-17)
Bird feeding helps females more than males
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that female birds benefit more from extra food in the winter. (2020-06-12)
'Matador' guppies trick predators
Trinidadian guppies behave like matadors, focusing a predator's point of attack before dodging away at the last moment, new research shows. (2020-06-11)
Mysterious Australian Night Parrots may not see in the dead of night
Australia's most elusive bird, the Night Parrot, may not be much better at seeing in the dark than other parrots active during the day. (2020-06-09)
Parasitic fungi keep harmful blue-green algae in check
When a lake is covered with green scums during a warm summer, cyanobacteria -- often called blue-green algae -- are usually involved. (2020-06-09)
A hormone -- plant style
Researchers from the Faculties of Chemistry and Biology at Bielefeld University have now found a method that might make the production of a biologically significant precursor of jasmonic acid more efficient and cheaper. (2020-05-29)
New study finds cannibalism in predatory dinosaurs
Big theropod dinosaurs such as Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus ate pretty much everything -- including each other, according to a new study. (2020-05-28)
Reintroduction of wolves tied to return of tall willows in Yellowstone National Park
The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of tall willows in the park, according to a new Oregon State University-led study. (2020-05-28)
What information is coded in bird alarm calls -- a new study from Korea
Recordings of the Oriental tit's alarm responses showed that alarm calls to snakes have special acoustic properties different from calls to chipmunks, even though both predators can enter bird's nests and destroy broods. (2020-05-25)
The European viper uses cloak-and-dazzle to escape predators
Research of the University of Jyväskylä demonstrates that the characteristic zig-zag pattern on a viper's back performs opposing functions during a predation event. (2020-05-21)
Peculiar behavior of the beetle Toramus larvae
When studying the larval morphology of Toramini (Coleoptera: Erotylidae) we found that larvae of the genus Toramus attach their exuviae to their distal abdomen, with each exuvia from the preceding instar attached to the next to form a vertical pile. (2020-05-21)
How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
New research from Kyoto University show that the coal tit (Periparus ater) can eavesdrop and react to the predatory warning calls of the Japanese tit (Parus minor) and evokes a visual image of the predator in their mind (2020-05-19)
Jurassic stick insect performed mimicry to defend against predators
Yang et al. reported the earliest mimetic and defensive strategies of a stick insect from the Middle Jurassic of China, Aclistophasma echinulatum gen. et sp. nov., exquisitely preserving abdominal extensions and femoral spines. (2020-05-18)
Sea skaters are a super source of inspiration
A study of marine Halobates species highlights how their waterproofing techniques, size and acceleration capability helped them colonize the ocean. (2020-05-15)
Saving livestock by thinking like a predator
Humans have struggled to reduce the loss of livestock to carnivores for thousands of years, and yet, solutions remain elusive. (2020-05-14)
T. rex was a champion walker, super-efficient at lower speeds
While smaller dinosaurs needed speed, huge predators like T. rex were optimized for energy-efficient walking, according to a study published May 13, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alexander Dececchi of Mount Marty College, South Dakota and colleagues. (2020-05-13)
T. rex's long legs were made for marathon walking
A new study by the University of Maryland's Thomas Holtz and his colleagues suggests that long legs evolved among the biggest dinosaurs to help them conserve energy as they ambled along searching for prey, rather than for speed as previously assumed. (2020-05-13)
Severe coral loss leaves reefs with larger fish but low energy turnover
Research on the Great Barrier Reef has found severe coral loss to be associated with substantial increases in the size of large, long-living herbivorous fish. (2020-05-06)
Outsmarting the enemy: Treefrogs rely on illusions to find a mate without being eaten
Researchers at Purdue University have discovered that male treefrogs reduce their attractiveness to predators and parasites by overlapping their mating calls with their neighbors. (2020-05-06)
White-faced capuchin monkeys come down from the trees on Panama's Coiba Island
An arboreal lifestyle is thought to be central to primate origins, and most extant primate species still live in the trees. (2020-04-28)
Crabeater seal data used to predict changes in Antarctic krill distribution
The western Antarctic Peninsula is experiencing rapid environmental change, with warming temperatures and decreasing sea ice. (2020-04-27)
What protects minority languages from extinction?
A new study by Jean-Marc Luck from Paris and Anita Mehta from Oxford published in EPJ B, uses mathematical modelling to suggest two mechanisms through which majority and minority languages come to coexist in the same area. (2020-04-22)
Lizards develop new 'love language'
Free from the risk of predators and intent to attract potential mates, male lizards relocated to experimental islets in Greece produce a novel chemical calling card, according to new research from biologists in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. (2020-04-21)
To warn or to hide from predators?: New computer simulation provides answers
Some toxic animals are bright to warn predators from attacking them, and some hide the warning colors, showing them only at the very last moment when they are about to be attacked. (2020-04-17)
Earth Day alert to save our frogs
With climate action a theme of Earth Day 2020 (April 22, 2020), a new research paper highlights the plight of some of the most at-risk amphibian species - and shortfalls in most conservation efforts. (2020-04-16)
Human handling stresses young monarch butterflies
People handle monarch butterflies. A lot. Every year thousands of monarch butterflies are caught, tagged and released during their fall migration by citizen scientists helping to track their movements. (2020-04-15)
Fossil record analysis hints at evolutionary origins of insects' structural colors
Researchers from Yale-NUS College in Singapore and University College Cork have analyzed preserved scales from wing cases of two fossil weevils from the Late Pleistocene era to better understand the origin of light-scattering nanostructures present in present-day insects. (2020-04-14)
About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet
Large open-water fish predators such as tunas or sharks hunt for prey more intensively in the temperate zone than near the equator. (2020-04-01)
When warblers warn of cowbirds, blackbirds get the message
This is the story of three bird species and how they interact. (2020-03-31)
International team discover new species of flying reptiles
A community of flying reptiles that inhabited the Sahara 100 million years ago has been discovered by a University of Portsmouth palaeontologist and an international team of scientists. (2020-03-26)
Fossil finds give clues about flying reptiles in the Sahara 100 million years ago
Three new species of toothed pterosaurs -- flying reptiles of the Cretaceous period, some 100 million years ago -- have been identified in Africa by an international team of scientists led by Baylor University. (2020-03-25)
A small forage fish should command greater notice, researchers say
A slender little fish called the sand lance plays a big role as 'a quintessential forage fish' for puffins, terns and other seabirds, humpback whales and other marine mammals, and even bigger fish such as Atlantic sturgeon, cod and bluefin tuna in the Gulf of Maine and northwest Atlantic Ocean. (2020-03-25)
Vibes before it bites: 10 types of defensive behaviour for the false coral snake
The False Coral Snake (Oxyrhopus rhombifer) may be capable of recognising various threat levels and demonstrates ten different defensive behaviours, seven of which are registered for the first time for the species. (2020-03-23)
'Fatal attraction': Small carnivores drawn to kill sites, then ambushed by larger kin
University of Washington researchers have discovered that large predators play a key yet unexpected role in keeping smaller predators and deer in check. (2020-03-18)
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