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Current Predators News and Events, Predators News Articles.
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Mites can change their diet depending on environmental conditions
A team of scientists from Tyumen State University together with their foreign colleagues discovered that soil mites change their dietary preferences if their habitat is transformed by human activity. (2019-12-12)
Azteca ant colonies move the same way leopards' spots form
What could Azteca ants in coffee farms in Mexico have in common with leopards' spots and zebras' stripes? (2019-12-11)
Habitat restoration alone not enough to support threatened caribou: UBC study
New UBC research suggests restoring habitat may not be enough to save threatened woodland caribou--an iconic animal that's a major part of boreal forests in North America and a key part of the culture and economy of many Indigenous peoples in Canada. (2019-11-27)
Shrewd savannah species choose friends with benefits on the African plains
For species trying to boost their chances of avoiding predation, it could be a classic case of 'it's not what you know, it's who you know that matters,' according to new research. (2019-11-27)
Coastal fog linked to high levels of mercury found in mountain lions, study finds
Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have discovered elevated levels of mercury in mountain lions, the latest indication that the neurotoxin is being carried in fog, deposited on the land, and making its way up the food chain. (2019-11-26)
A decade after the predators have gone, Galapagos Island finches are still being spooked
On some of the Galapagos Islands where human-introduced predators of Darwin's finches were eradicated over a decade ago, the finches are still acting as though they are in danger, according to research published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology. (2019-11-20)
Jackdaw mobs flip from chaos to order as they grow
Chaotic mobs of jackdaws suddenly get organised once enough birds join in, new research shows. (2019-11-15)
Is evolution predictable?
An international team of scientists working with Heliconius butterflies at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama was faced with a mystery: how do pairs of unrelated butterflies from Peru to Costa Rica evolve nearly the same wing-color patterns over and over again? (2019-11-14)
Bigger doesn't mean better for hatchery-released salmon
A recent study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecosphere examines hatchery practices in regards to how Chinook salmon hatcheries in the PNW are affecting wild populations over the past decades. (2019-11-14)
Healthy mangroves help coral reef fisheries under climate stress
Healthy mangroves can help fight the consequences of climate change on coral reef fisheries, according to a University of Queensland-led study. (2019-11-12)
Jurassic dinosaurs trotted between Africa and Europe
Dinosaur footprints found in several European countries, very similar to others in Morocco, suggest that they could have been dispersed between the two continents by land masses separated by a shallow sea more than 145 million years ago. (2019-10-25)
Lonesome no more: White sharks hang with buddies
White sharks form communities, researchers have revealed. Although normally solitary predators, white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) gather in large numbers at certain times of year in order to feast on baby seals. (2019-10-21)
Toad disguises itself as deadly viper to avoid attack -- world-first study reports
The first study of a toad mimicking a venomous snake reveals that it likely imitates one of Africa's largest vipers in both appearance and behaviour, according to results published in the Journal of Natural History. (2019-10-20)
Scientists discover new species of wasp-mimicking praying mantis
Cleveland Museum of Natural History Director of Research and Collections Dr. (2019-10-17)
Right whale mothers 'whisper' to their calves to avoid attracting predators
As new moms, North Atlantic right whales tone down their underwater vocalizations and 'whisper' to their young calves to avoid attracting predators, a new study by scientists at Syracuse University, Duke University and NOAA Fisheries' Northeast Fisheries Center finds. (2019-10-10)
Hush, little baby: Mother right whales 'whisper' to calves
A recent study led by Syracuse University biology professor Susan Parks in Biology Letters explores whether right whale mother-calf pairs change their vocalizations to keep predators from detecting them. (2019-10-09)
Reef fish caring for their young are taken advantage of by other fish
Among birds, the practice of laying eggs in other birds' nests is surprisingly common. (2019-10-09)
Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs
By rearing frogs with parents -- or foster parents -- of different colors, a team from the University of Pittsburgh working at the Smithsonian in Panama discovered that behavior in response to color may be more important than genetics in the evolution of new species. (2019-10-03)
Predators and hidey-holes are good for reef fish populations
New research highlights two factors that play a critical role in supporting reef fish populations and - ultimately - creating conditions that are more favorable for the growth of both coral reefs and seagrass. (2019-10-01)
Mob mentality rules jackdaw flocks
Jackdaws are more likely to join a mob to drive off predators if lots of their fellow birds are up for the fight, new research shows. (2019-10-01)
What did ancient crocodiles eat? Study says as much as a snout can grab
To study the diet of ancient crocodiles, two researchers--one from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and one from Stony Brook University--combined mathematical analyses of the animals' shapes, surveys of modern crocodiles' diet, modeling methods for reconstructing the diet of fossil groups, and forensic-style interpretations of damaged bones from the distant past. (2019-09-30)
Viruses as modulators of interactions in marine ecosystems
Viruses are mainly known as pathogens - often causing death. (2019-09-26)
Bats use private and social information as they hunt
As some of the most savvy and sophisticated predators out there, bats eavesdrop on their prey and even on other bats to collect a wide variety of information as they hunt. (2019-09-24)
Guppies teach us why evolution happens
New study on guppies shows that animals evolve in response the the environment they create in the absence of predators, rather than in response to the risk of being eaten. (2019-09-18)
Ecologists find strong evidence of fishing down the food web in freshwater lake
Research by ecologists at the University of Toronto and Ontario's Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry shows strong evidence in a freshwater lake of ''fishing down the food web'' - the deliberate shift away from top predatory fish on the food chain to smaller species closer to the base. (2019-09-18)
International scientists shed new light on demise of two extinct New Zealand songbirds
They may not have been seen for the past 50 and 110 years, but an international study into their extinction has provided answers to how the world lost New Zealand's South Island kokako and huia. (2019-09-03)
Toxic frogs with weak defenses persist in the gene pool alongside stronger competitors
A multi-national team of evolutionary biologists investigated how two types of poison frog co-exist when we expect only one. (2019-09-02)
Crouching lion, hidden giraffe
The behavior of giraffe groups with calves is influenced more strongly by the risk of predators than is the behavior of all-adult groups, which is mostly determined by the availability of food. (2019-08-29)
Separate polarization and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators
Fiddler crabs see the polarization of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or a predator. (2019-08-21)
Decades-old puzzle of the ecology of soil animals solved
An international research team led by the University of Goettingen has deciphered the defence mechanism of filamentous fungi. (2019-08-20)
Fear of predators causes PTSD-like changes in brains of wild animals
A new study by Western University demonstrates that the fear predators inspire can leave long-lasting traces in the neural circuitry of wild animals and induce enduringly fearful behaviour, comparable to effects seen in PTSD research. (2019-08-07)
Industrial fishing behind plummeting shark numbers
A team of researchers, led by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), has discovered that sharks are much rarer in habitats nearer large human populations and fish markets. (2019-08-06)
Intense look at La Brea Tar Pits explains why we have coyotes, not saber-toothed cats
The most detailed study to date of ancient predators trapped in the La Brea Tar Pits is helping Americans understand why today we're dealing with coyotes dumping over garbage cans and not saber-toothed cats ripping our arms off. (2019-08-05)
Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators
Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. (2019-08-02)
Caterpillars of the peppered moth perceive color through their skin
It is difficult to distinguish caterpillars of the peppered moth from a twig. (2019-08-02)
For anemonefish, male-to-female sex change happens first in the brain
The anemonefish is a gender-bending marvel. It starts out as a male, but can switch to female when circumstances allow, for example, when the only female present dies or disappears. (2019-07-23)
Predators' fear of humans ripples through wildlife communities, emboldening rodents
Giving credence to the saying, 'While the cat's away, the mice will play,' a new study indicates that pumas and medium-sized carnivores lie low when they sense the presence of humans, which frees up the landscape for rodents to forage more brazenly. (2019-07-17)
Spawn of the triffid? Tiny organisms give us glimpse into complex evolutionary tale
Two newly discovered organisms point to the existence of an ancient organism that resembled a tiny version of the lumbering, human-eating science fiction plants known as 'triffids,' according to research in Nature. (2019-07-17)
Effectiveness of using natural enemies to combat pests depends on surroundings
A new study of cabbage crops in New York -- a state industry worth close to $60 million in 2017, according to the USDA -- reports for the first time that the effectiveness of releasing natural enemies to combat pests depends on the landscape surrounding the field. (2019-07-15)
Fear of predators increases risk of illness
Predators are not only a deadly threat to many animals, they also affect potential prey negatively simply by being nearby. (2019-07-09)
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