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Current Prescription drugs News and Events

Current Prescription drugs News and Events, Prescription drugs News Articles.
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Brand drug discount cards increase private insurer costs by 46%
Discount cards for brand-name drugs provided to patients increased private insurer costs by 46% and varied in their impact on out-of-pocket payments by patients, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-11-11)
Drug discount cards could actually cost patients more
New research published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) reveals that brand-name drug discount cards are leading to higher health care spending in Canada -- increased costs that are ultimately passed on to patients. (2019-11-11)
ACP issues policy recommendations aimed at mitigating the rising costs of prescription drugs
In two new policy papers, the American College of Physicians (ACP) calls for changes aimed at mitigating the rising cost of prescription drugs. (2019-11-11)
Babies exposed to TNFi or tofacitinib in utero experience very few serious infections
A new study found that very few serious infections were seen in children born to mothers with chronic inflammatory diseases who used non-TNFi biologics or tofacitinib during pregnancy compared to children not exposed to these drugs and children exposed to TNFi biologics in utero. (2019-11-09)
Post-market price changes alone account for most recent spending growth for biologics
New research findings presented at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting found that annual spending on biologic DMARDS (biologics) by US public programs and beneficiaries nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016. (2019-11-09)
High numbers of youth report using prescription opioids in the past year
A new analysis of US data finds an unexpectedly high prevalence of prescription opioid use among youth. (2019-11-08)
Medication use during pregnancy is common in women with preeclampsia
Use of medications during pregnancy is more common in women with preeclampsia than in those without, according to a British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology analysis of women who gave birth at a hospital in Finland in 2002-2016. (2019-11-06)
Liver-chip predicts the toxicity of drug candidates across species
Researchers have created a 'Liver-Chip' using Organs-on-Chips technology that can predict and characterize the liver toxicity of various drug candidates and compounds in rats, dogs, and humans. (2019-11-06)
Study calculates links between prescription medications and risk for suicide
A review of 922 prescription medications taken by almost 150 million people over an 11-year period shows that just 10 of these drugs were associated with an increased rate of suicide attempts. (2019-11-05)
Substance use, misuse and dependence: A PLOS Medicine special issue
This week sees publication of the first research papers that will form part of PLOS Medicine's latest Special Issue, which is devoted to understanding the substantial challenges caused by substance use and misuse and seeking to inform responses in the health sector and beyond. (2019-11-05)
Poll reveals older adults' risky use of antibiotics, opportunities to improve prescribing
Half of older Americans got help from the infection-fighting power of antibiotics in the past 2 years, a new poll finds, but a sizable minority didn't follow the instructions on their pill bottle. (2019-11-04)
Survey: Seriously ill Medicare beneficiaries can face considerable financial hardship
In a nationwide survey, 53% of seriously ill Medicare beneficiaries reported having problems paying a medical bill. (2019-11-04)
Biosimilar drugs can reduce costs but still face challenges in the US
Biologics used to treat patients can be incredibly expensive, so there was significant hope that biosimilar drugs -- which are highly similar to an existing biologic drug on the market -- could serve as a less-costly substitute. (2019-11-04)
Eye doctors prescribe fewer opioids without compromising pain control
After eye surgery, patients get more opioids than necessary, according to findings by University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center published in JAMA Ophthalmology. (2019-10-31)
Of all professions, construction workers most likely to use opioids and cocaine
Construction workers are more likely to use drugs than workers in other professions, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU College of Global Public Health. (2019-10-30)
Significantly fewer pregnant women take antidepressants
A pregnancy is not always a happy event and as many as 10-15% of pregnant women in Denmark have depressive symptoms. (2019-10-29)
Opioid prescribing and use drop significantly after state imposes regulations
A state-mandated policy restricting opioid prescriptions along with increased public awareness and education about the opioid epidemic preceded drastic reductions in opioid prescribing and use for surgical patients at the University of Vermont Medical Center (UVMMC) without impacting patient satisfaction with their postoperative pain management. (2019-10-29)
US-born residents more than 5 times likely to use prescription opioids than new immigrants
The longer immigrants live in the United States, the more likely they are to use prescription opioids -- a fact that contradicts popular views linking wealth and health, and suggests that American culture is uniquely favorable toward prescribing opioids. (2019-10-29)
Drug overdose deaths in CT doubled in 6 years
Opioid overdose deaths in Connecticut doubled in the past 6 years, largely driven by use of multiple drugs together, according to a team of researchers from the University of Connecticut and Yale University. (2019-10-29)
Scientists are developing a way to counter ulcerative colitis
Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a long-term condition that results in inflammation and ulcers of the colon and rectum. (2019-10-28)
Length of time in US associated with immigrants' opioid use
The more time first-generation immigrants spend in the United States the more likely it appears they will use prescription opioids. (2019-10-25)
Simple conversations can reduce opioid prescriptions after hysterectomy
Women who undergo a hysterectomy are often prescribed at least twice as many opioids as they use - but there may be a simple way to change that. (2019-10-22)
Prescribing rates for anxiety and sleeping drugs highest in deprived areas
Prescriptions for drugs to treat anxiety, alcohol withdrawal and sleep problems are highest in the most deprived areas in England, according to a new study from the University of Warwick. (2019-10-22)
Mayo Clinic study: 20% of patients are prescribed opioids after cardiac device implantation surgery
One in five patients is prescribed opioids after having a pacemaker or similar device implanted, according to a large US study conducted at Mayo Clinic published in HeartRhythm. (2019-10-21)
Closures affect 1 in 8 pharmacies in the US
Despite an overall increase in the number of pharmacies in the U.S. from 2009 to 2015, one in eight pharmacies, or 9,654, had closed during this period. (2019-10-21)
Repurposing heart drugs to target cancer cells
This study has highlighted a novel senolytic drug - drug that eliminates senescent cells -- that are currently being used to treat heart conditions that could be repurposed to target cancer cells, and a range of other conditions. (2019-10-21)
Opioids often prescribed after cesarean delivery even when not needed
Nearly 90% of women who did not use opioids in the hospital after cesarean delivery were nonetheless discharged with a prescription for opioids, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. (2019-10-20)
New study may have the reason why heart medication gives muscle pain
The McMaster research team found muscle cells treated with statins released the amino acid called glutamate at much higher levels than muscle cells that were untreated. (2019-10-15)
Opioid Rx dosages drop 22% in Penn Medicine's NJ practices following changes to state law
The total amount of opioids dispensed per new opioid prescription decreased by 22% in Penn Medicine outpatient practices in New Jersey after the state passed a law limiting prescriptions to a five-day supply for new opioid prescriptions. (2019-10-11)
National focus on overdose prevention should include alcohol too, study suggests
The need to prevent and rapidly treat opioid overdoses is in the spotlight. (2019-10-11)
Food insecure Canadian households may have trouble affording prescription medication
Food insecurity is linked to higher disease rates but not much is known about the reasons for this. (2019-10-11)
Taking RTKI drugs during radiotherapy may not aid survival, worsens side effects
Taking certain cancer-fighting drugs while undergoing radiation therapy may not increase survival for patients, but may, instead, increase side effects, according to a team of researchers. (2019-10-10)
Statins linked to higher risk of diabetes and skin infections
Statins have been reported to be beneficial for infections such as pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia. (2019-10-09)
Study assesses cost of overpayments for topical prescription medications
This study examined how common and at what cost is the practice of so-called 'clawbacks' for topical prescription drugs when an insured patient's copayment exceeds the insurer's cost for the drug. (2019-10-09)
Cancer patients who exercise have less heart damage from chemotherapy
Patients with cancer should receive a tailored exercise prescription to protect their heart, reports a paper published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2019-10-07)
Computer kidney sheds light on proper hydration
A new computer kidney developed at the University of Waterloo could tell researchers more about the impacts of medicines taken by people who don't drink enough water. (2019-10-07)
Antipsychotics linked to accumulation of hospital days in persons with Alzheimer's disease
People with Alzheimer's disease who used antipsychotic drugs had a higher number of accumulated hospital days than people with Alzheimer's disease who did not use antipsychotics, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. (2019-10-07)
Ingestible sensor allows patients to be independent but still supported during TB treatment
Ingestible sensor enables patients to take tuberculosis drugs independently and receive timely support from medical staff. (2019-10-04)
Just add water: U-M chemists suggest a fix for insoluble drugs
Stable metal organic frameworks are prized for their ability to capture carbon dioxide or harvest atmospheric water, but U-M researchers have developed a use for unstable metal organic frameworks: as a system for drug delivery. (2019-10-03)
Kidney function may affect risks associated with prescription opioids
Compared with other pain medications, prescription opioids were linked with higher risks of death and hospitalization, particularly with higher doses. (2019-10-03)
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