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Current Primary care News and Events

Current Primary care News and Events, Primary care News Articles.
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Direct-to-patient telemedicine cardiology follow-ups may safely save families time, cost
Health provider follow-ups delivered via computer or smartphone is a feasible alternative to in-person patient follow-ups for some pediatric cardiac conditions, according to the findings of a pilot study presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions this week. (2019-11-14)
Training family doctors to better support domestic violence survivors
Women who are experiencing domestic violence feel better supported, more confident and less depressed when they are counselled by trained family doctors, according to new research. (2019-11-13)
Contacts with primary care physicians did not increase after the Affordable Care Act
At the same time the Affordable Care Act increased the number of insured Americans, analysis of health care industry data shows a continued decline in contact with primary care physician services. (2019-11-12)
A national decline in primary care visits associated with more comprehensive visits and electronic follow-up
The number of primary care visits may be declining nationally, but analysis reveals that in-person visits have become more comprehensive and follow-up care has moved online. (2019-11-12)
Capacity to address patient social needs affects primary care clinician burnout
Clinicians noted the importance of social needs interventions being timely, accessible and tailored to each individual patient, while being responsive to patient feedback. (2019-11-12)
Practice characteristics and job satisfaction among GPs in 11 countries
Organizational and functional features of general practitioner practices in 11 countries were studied in search of underlying reasons for job dissatisfaction. (2019-11-12)
Stress testing the healthcare system
Austrian scientists can for the first time determine the resilience of the health care system in a region. (2019-11-11)
GP clinics could help bridge mental health treatment gap, study finds
Patients experiencing mild to moderate mental health issues could be managed effectively by GP practices, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. (2019-11-07)
Tailor-made for older adults, new tools improve doctor-patient relations
A Wilmot Cancer Institute-led study in JAMA Oncology shows that when physicians fully appreciate the concerns of older adults with cancer, such as function and forgetfulness, it elevates patient care and satisfaction. (2019-11-07)
Care plans reduce risk of ending up in hospital for patients with severe mental illness
The chances of a patient with a serious mental illness ending up in hospital because of their condition are reduced by almost 40 per cent if they have a care plan, according to research from the University of York. (2019-11-04)
New study reveals girls more likely to be admitted to hospital after self-harming
Girls in Wales are much more likely to end up in hospital after self-harming than boys according to new research led by Swansea University. (2019-10-29)
Survey reveals the hidden costs of care cascades
Just about any medical test can turn up an incidental finding that leads to a cascade of follow-up tests. (2019-10-29)
Antihistamine use for anaphylaxis symptoms linked with delay seeking emergency treatment
New research suggests that giving antihistamine medicine to a child experiencing anaphylaxis -- a sudden and severe allergic reaction that can quickly be fatal -- usually does more harm than good by delaying emergency treatment. (2019-10-25)
Study finds functional medicine model is associated with improvements in health-related QOL
In the first retrospective cohort study of the functional medicine model, Cleveland Clinic researchers found that functional medicine was associated with improvements in health-related quality of life. (2019-10-25)
Gap in care found for patients with chronic kidney disease: study
Millions of Canadians living with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be going without critical testing from their primary care practitioners that would give them a good idea of the severity of the disease so they could intervene earlier with more appropriate care, according to a new study. (2019-10-24)
New research shows lower rates of cancer screening in women with diabetes
Cancer screening rates are up to a quarter lower in women with diabetes, varying by type of cancer, and putting them at risk of poorer cancer outcomes, concludes new research in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]). (2019-10-24)
Study looks at distribution of new cases of diabetes, density of specialists
Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital analyzed national data on the prevalence of diabetes and the number of internal medicine specialists in each U.S. state. (2019-10-23)
Central Valley workplaces can be hostile for minority doctors
Despite the dire need for primary health care providers in California's Central Valley, workplace discrimination and harassment can cause them to change practices or leave the region entirely. (2019-10-23)
Health care intervention: Treating high-need, high-cost patients
Patients with complex needs -- serious mental and physical health problems and substance use disorders -- flock to emergency rooms costing the health care system billions every year. (2019-10-17)
40% of people did not visit a family doctor after being released from prison
A new study analyzing the experiences of people released from provincial prison in Ontario in 2010 has found that 60% of people who were in Ontario's prison system were seen by a family doctor in the two years after being released from prison compared to 85% of people in the general population. (2019-10-11)
Study examines care for knee osteoarthritis in the United States
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research provides an overview of US physicians' recommendations for physical therapy, lifestyle counseling, pain medications for treating knee osteoarthritis. (2019-10-09)
Lymphoma stage at diagnosis may predict when and where new cancer forms
Colorado study shows the stage at which lymphoma is originally diagnosed impacts the types of second cancers that may form after treatment. (2019-10-08)
Pharmacists provide patient value in team-based care
As part of an innovative model being used at UNT Health Science Center, Dr. (2019-10-08)
Coordinated care model leads to decreases in unscheduled, preventable hospitalizations
Oregon Medicaid enrollees are less likely to make unscheduled trips to the hospital following the implementation of the state's accountable-care model, new research shows. (2019-10-07)
Growing minority of teachers in Northern Ireland working across sectarian divide
A study by researchers at the University of Ulster has found that more teachers in Northern Ireland than ever before are working across the sectarian divide, with teachers from Catholic communities working in Protestant schools and vice versa. (2019-10-06)
Barrier to rural opioid treatment: Driving distance to methadone clinics
People who live in rural counties in five states heavily affected by the opioid epidemic must drive longer distances to obtain methadone, a treatment for opioid addiction, compared to individuals from urban counties, say Yale researchers. (2019-10-01)
Collaboration may improve access to HIV testing, primary care
Getting better access to testing and proper primary care for individuals vulnerable to HIV could be as simple as a telephone call or email among health providers. (2019-10-01)
BU finds physical therapy access may reduce opioid prescriptions
Low back pain is one of the most common conditions Americans seek care for--and one of the more common reasons for an opioid prescription. (2019-09-30)
Expanding Medicaid means chronic health problems get found & health improves, study finds
Nearly one in three low-income people who enrolled in Michigan's expanded Medicaid program discovered they had a common chronic illness that had never been diagnosed before, according to a new study. (2019-09-30)
Risk of heart valve infections rising in hospitals
People with heart disease or defective or artificial heart valves are at increased risk of developing a potentially deadly valve infection. (2019-09-29)
First large-scale study of universal screening for autism raises questions about accuracy
In the first large, real-world study of universal screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in toddlers, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that the most widely used and researched screening tool is less accurate than shown in previous studies conducted in research laboratory settings. (2019-09-27)
Better methods needed for predicting risk of liver disease
While blood samples can reliably identify people with a low risk of developing severe liver disease, better methods are needed in primary care for identifying people in most need of care. (2019-09-27)
Prediction system significantly increases palliative care consults
A trigger system powered by predictive analytics increased palliative care consultations by 75 percent after its implementation (2019-09-25)
Tool kit provides real world guidelines for counseling for weight loss in primary care
Healthcare practitioners and researchers have a new tool to combat obesity in primary care settings, according to a study published in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society. (2019-09-24)
Study casts doubt on effectiveness of named GP scheme
An NHS scheme to give every patient aged 75 and over in England a named GP responsible for their care has failed to deliver hoped-for improvements, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care. (2019-09-23)
Case management in primary care associated with positive outcomes
In a systematic review, researchers identified three characteristics of case management programs that consistently yielded positive results: case selection for frequent users with complex problems, high-intensity case management interventions and a multidisciplinary care plan. (2019-09-09)
Factors associated with longer wait times in colorectal cancer specialty care referrals
Delay in referral to specialty care for patients who have symptoms of colorectal cancer may lead to poor health outcomes. (2019-09-09)
Primary care physicians outline barriers to managing chronic kidney disease
On July 10, 2019 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced they were aiming to reduce the number of Americans developing end-stage renal disease by 25% by 2030. (2019-09-09)
Black, Hispanic patients more likely to be brought to safety-net hospital emergency rooms
A new national study done by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center showed large differences in the emergency department (ED) and hospital destinations of minority (Black and Hispanic) patients who are transported by emergency medical services (EMS) when compared with their non-Hispanic white counterparts. (2019-09-06)
Researchers find alarming risk for people coming off chronic opioid prescriptions
A recent study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine found an alarming outcome: Patients coming off opioids for pain were three times more likely to die of an overdose in the years that followed. (2019-09-05)
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