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Current Primary care News and Events

Current Primary care News and Events, Primary care News Articles.
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Case management in primary care associated with positive outcomes
In a systematic review, researchers identified three characteristics of case management programs that consistently yielded positive results: case selection for frequent users with complex problems, high-intensity case management interventions and a multidisciplinary care plan. (2019-09-09)
Factors associated with longer wait times in colorectal cancer specialty care referrals
Delay in referral to specialty care for patients who have symptoms of colorectal cancer may lead to poor health outcomes. (2019-09-09)
Primary care physicians outline barriers to managing chronic kidney disease
On July 10, 2019 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced they were aiming to reduce the number of Americans developing end-stage renal disease by 25% by 2030. (2019-09-09)
Black, Hispanic patients more likely to be brought to safety-net hospital emergency rooms
A new national study done by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center showed large differences in the emergency department (ED) and hospital destinations of minority (Black and Hispanic) patients who are transported by emergency medical services (EMS) when compared with their non-Hispanic white counterparts. (2019-09-06)
Researchers find alarming risk for people coming off chronic opioid prescriptions
A recent study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine found an alarming outcome: Patients coming off opioids for pain were three times more likely to die of an overdose in the years that followed. (2019-09-05)
In Health Affairs: Moving deliveries to hospitals in low- and middle-income countries
In many low- and middle-income countries, maternal and neonatal mortality remains high. (2019-09-03)
Does appointment time influence primary care opioid prescribing?
Physicians at primary care appointments were more likely to prescribe opioids for pain later in the day and as appointments ran more behind schedule, although the absolute difference in the prescribing rate across the day was modest in this analysis of electronic health records. (2019-08-30)
Changing treatment practices for alcohol use disorder could save lives
Treatment practices in Canada and abroad need to change in order to help more people with alcohol use disorder, according to a CAMH-led article just published in The Lancet. (2019-08-29)
Depression linked to costly chronic medical conditions and disability among aging minorities
More than 50% of older Chinese American immigrants experience depressive symptoms linked to increased disabilities and chronic health conditions, according to two new Rutgers studies. (2019-08-28)
Elderly have poor prognosis after recovery in long-term acute care hospitals
While long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) are designed to help patients recover and regain independence, fewer than one in five older adults who were transferred to such facilities were alive five years later, leaving them with a worse prognosis than terminal illnesses such as advanced cancer, according to research at UC San Francisco and The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. (2019-08-26)
Patient charges mean young people visit doctor less
When young adults pass the age limit for paying patient co-payments, or out-of-pocket prices, their medical consultations in primary care decrease by 7 percent, a study shows. (2019-08-21)
Machine learning models help clinicians identify people who need advanced depression care
Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University researchers have created decision models capable of predicting which patients might need more treatment for their depression than what their primary care provider can offer. (2019-08-20)
Parent-targeted interventions in primary care improve parent-teen communication on alcohol and sex
New research shows that brief parent-targeted interventions in the primary care setting can increase communication between parents and their teens about sexual and alcohol-related behavior. (2019-08-19)
Should doctors accept unvaccinated children as patients?
Four in 10 parents say they are very or somewhat likely to move their child to a different provider if their doctor sees families who refuse all childhood vaccines, according to a new national poll. (2019-08-19)
Children with mild asthma can use inhalers as needed
A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. (2019-08-16)
Understanding where patients live can improve patient health
Family physicians typically don't consider where patients live when assessing their health care needs, despite research that indicates a person's environment can significantly affect their health. (2019-08-13)
Mental health specialists boost vets' access to outpatient services
A Veterans Health Administration program that added mental health specialists, care managers or both in primary care clinics significantly improved access to mental health and primary care services to veterans with behavioral health needs. (2019-08-09)
Physicians call for an end to conversion therapy
Historically, conversion therapies have used electroshock therapy, chemical drugs, hormone administrations and even surgery. (2019-08-07)
Younger colorectal cancer patients: A missed opportunity for non-emergency diagnoses
In an analysis of information on 10,463 UK patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer from 2006 to 2013, patients under the age of 50 years were more likely to initially experience non-specific symptoms before being referred to cancer specialists. (2019-08-07)
No racial disparities in quality-of-care for CABG outcomes for those insured by TRICARE
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital examined whether patients insured through TRICARE -- a universal insurance and equal-access system that covers more than 9 million active-duty members, veterans and their families -- experienced these disparities. (2019-08-05)
Lymph nodes can predict survival in patients with esophageal cancer
It is difficult for physicians to estimate recurrence and survival in patients with esophageal cancer. (2019-07-29)
Little helpers for the rainforest
Primate researchers show how monkeys contribute to the regeneration of tropical forests. (2019-07-25)
Survey finds patients want more guidance from physicians on self-care
Physicians and consumers agree that self-care is important to health, yet 75% of patients say they haven't discussed it with their physician within the last two years, according to a new survey released today, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. (2019-07-23)
Survey finds physicians struggle with their own self-care
Despite believing that self-care is a vitally important part of health and overall well-being, many physicians overlook their own self-care, according to a new survey released today, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. (2019-07-23)
Researchers find widespread aspirin use despite few benefits, high risks
Nearly 30 million Americans older than 40 take aspirin daily to prevent cardiovascular disease. (2019-07-22)
Researchers unveil experimental compound to block therapeutic target in blood cancer
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have discovered a hyperactive cell signal that contributes to tumor growth in primary effusion lymphoma, an aggressive type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma caused by infection with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus-8). (2019-07-22)
Around one in 20 patients are affected by preventable harm
Around one in 20 (6%) of patients are affected by preventable harm in medical care, of which around 12% causes permanent disability or death, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2019-07-17)
Dementia and transitional care: Gaps in research and practice
In a new study published in the Journal of Gerontological Nursing, Prusaczyk and colleagues showed that older patients with dementia at one major teaching hospital were less often provided with transitional care steps including patient education, discharge planning, and documentation of medication history, as compared to patients without dementia. (2019-07-16)
Child psychiatry telephone programs help increase mental health services for children
More than half of the children in the US with mental health problems do not receive needed treatment, often because there are too few child mental health specialists to provide the services needed. (2019-07-15)
Adults with HIV who have compassionate care providers start and remain in treatment longer
Rutgers researchers find patients who perceive their primary care providers as lacking empathy and not willing to include them in decision making are at risk for abandoning treatment or not seeking treatment at all. (2019-07-14)
Dartmouth study examines association between care management and outcomes in Medicare ACOs
New research from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice finds that Accountable Care Organization (ACO)-reported care management and coordination activities were not associated with improved outcomes or lower spending for patients with complex needs. (2019-07-12)
Taking opioids for pain may make it harder to find primary care, study finds
Finding a new doctor for health checkups and general care can pose a challenge to anyone. (2019-07-12)
Study identifies new potential target in glioblastoma
Researchers are hopeful that new strategies could emerge for slowing the growth and recurrence of the most common primary brain cancer in adults, glioblastoma, based on the results of a study published today in Cancer Research. (2019-07-10)
Study finds ACOs need a balance of PCPs and specialists to best reduce health care costs
Accountable care organizations (ACOs), the health care delivery model created by the Affordable Care Act in an effort to reduce Medicare costs while improving coordination and quality of care, typically rely on primary care providers (PCPs) to steer the boat. (2019-07-10)
Diabetes patients experiencing empathy from PCPs have lower risk of mortality
A United Kingdom study designed to examine the association between primary care practitioner empathy and incidence of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality among type 2 diabetes patients found that those patients experiencing greater empathy in the year following their diagnosis saw beneficial long-term clinical outcomes. (2019-07-10)
Redesign of opioid medication management shows impact in rural clinics
In rural practice, a system redesign resulted in declines in the proportion of patients on high dose opioids and the number of patients receiving opioids. (2019-07-10)
Many still uninsured after Affordable Care Act Implementation
In community health centers in Medicaid expansion states, among established patients who were uninsured prior to the Affordable Care Act, many remained uninsured after implementation of the Obama-era law. (2019-07-10)
A structured approach to detecting and treating depression in primary care
A questionnaire-based management algorithm for major depressive disorder in primary care is feasible to implement, though attrition from treatment is high. (2019-07-10)
Nonphysician practitioners absorbing more new patient requests post Affordable Care Act
The advent of the Affordable Care Act has led to millions of new patients seeking primary care. (2019-07-10)
A new approach to primary care: Advanced team care with in-room support
In this special report, the authors argue that the current primary care team paradigm is underpowered, in that most of the administrative responsibility still falls mainly on the physician. (2019-07-10)
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