Current Productivity News and Events

Current Productivity News and Events, Productivity News Articles.
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In temperate trees, climate-driven increase in carbon capture causes autumn leaves to fall sooner
For decades, scientists have expected that the shedding of leaves from temperate trees will get later and later under ongoing climate change. (2020-11-26)

Study shows minimal impact of APPs on ED productivity, flow, safety, patient experience
Advanced practice providers (APPs) have lower productivity compared with emergency department physicians, seeing fewer and less complex patients and generating less relative value units per hour, and having no apparent impact on patient satisfaction and safety metrics. (2020-11-25)

Gender differences in academic productivity during COVID-19 pandemic
During the COVID-19 pandemic, most science and medical faculty began working from home, with women reporting a significant decrease in manuscript submissions. Women also report providing 77.6% of the childcare themselves, compared to 61.3% for men, (2020-11-24)

WSU scientists discover new, simple way to classify marine biomes
Washington State University scientists have developed a new way to classify the ocean's diverse environments, shedding new light on how marine biomes are defined and changed by nature and humans. (2020-11-20)

Future lake food webs in subarctic have more biomass and contain more omega-3 fatty acids
Subarctic regions are facing rapid changes in climate and land-use intensity. An international research team recently completed an investigation to see how these changes are affecting the food webs and fish communities of lakes in northern Finland. Biomasses and omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, were determined from the algal producers at the base of food web to large carnivorous fish from 20 lakes along a pronounced climatic and productivity gradient. (2020-10-30)

Waste not, want not: recycled water proves fruitful for greenhouse tomatoes
In the driest state in the driest continent in the world, South Australian farmers are acutely aware of the impact of water shortages and drought. So, when it comes to irrigation, knowing which method works best is vital for sustainable crop development. (2020-10-29)

Artificial cyanobacterial biofilm can sustain green ethylene production for over a month
Ethylene is one of the most important and widely used organic chemicals. The research group at the University of Turku led by Associate Professor Yagut Allahverdiyeva-Rinne has designed a thin-layer artificial biofilm with embedded cyanobacterial cell factories which were specifically engineered for photosynthetic production of ''green'' ethylene. The fabricated biofilms have sustained ethylene production for up to 40 days. (2020-10-15)

Illinois research links soil nitrogen levels to corn yield and nitrogen losses
What exactly is the relationship between soil nitrogen, corn yield, and nitrogen loss? Most farmers would be forgiven for assuming a straightforward linear relationship: more nitrogen, more grain yield, and maybe, more loss. That's the assumption many nitrogen management models are based on, but it turns out there's very little published science to back up that assumption. (2020-10-13)

Lack of support prolongs unemployment
Unemployed persons whose appointment with the responsible caseworker at the employment office is canceled unexpectedly remain unemployed for an average of twelve days longer. This is what Bonn economist Amelie Schiprowski established in a study by the Cluster of Excellence ECONtribute: Markets & Public Policy at the Universities of Cologne and Bonn (Germany). (2020-10-08)

Cyanobacteria as "green" catalysts in biotechnology
Researchers from TU Graz and Ruhr University Bochum show in the journal ACS Catalysis how the catalytic activity of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, can be significantly increased. This brings biotechnological and thus eco-friendly application a big step closer. (2020-10-05)

Reducing the high social cost of death
Researchers in Japan report on how bereavement can have far-reaching implications to an individual's health and their economic status. Deeper grief caused by the death of a loved one, correlates with an overarching decline in quality of life, seen in physical ailments, more down time, and higher rates of medical reliance. The report also highlights how you can possible predict who may need the most help in the future. (2020-10-05)

Ocean warming and acidification effects on calcareous phytoplankton communities
A new study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that the negative effects of rapid ocean warming on planktonic communities will be exacerbated by ocean acidification. (2020-09-30)

Scientists map freshwater transport in the Arctic Ocean
The Ob, Yenisei, and Lena rivers flow into the Kara and Laptev seas and account for about half of the total freshwater runoff to the Arctic Ocean. The transport and transformation of freshwater discharge in these seas have a large impact on ice formation, biological productivity, and many other processes in the Arctic. Russian researchers have investigated the spreading of large river plumes -- that is, freshened water masses formed as a result of river runoff mixing with ambient saltwater -- in the Russian Arctic seas. (2020-09-10)

Is APM the best way to evaluate NBA players?
A recent study by sport analytics professors shows the Adjusted Plus-Minus (APM) statistic used to evaluate the performance of NBA players is sometimes misleading because it does not accurately account for the quality of a player's teammates. (2020-09-07)

Char application restores soil carbon and productivity
After two years of char application, researchers find increased soil Carbon, magnesium, and sodium concentrations. (2020-08-27)

Scientists to discover the unique ductile properties of aluminum
During experiments on high-performance Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) researchers from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) produced a metal with unique ductility. The ductility is three times higher than specified in the standard. The research results were published in a prestigious journal - ''Materials & Design''. (2020-08-26)

Study finds that water efficiency achievable throughout US without decree
Northern Arizona University researchers Ben Ruddell and Richard Rushforth, with collaborators throughout the country, looked at how much water conservation can readily and affordably be achieved in each region and industry by looking at what conservation measures were already working and considering how much water is being used. (2020-08-26)

Study identifies first step to beating water scarcity
New research has revealed the locations and industries in the USA where efforts to improve water consumption would have the greatest benefit for economic activity and the environment. The study, led by researchers from Virginia Tech, used a spatially detailed database of water productivity to set realistic benchmarks for more than 400 industries and products. It is published today in the IOP Publishing journal Environmental Research Letters. (2020-08-24)

Environment drivers of ecological complexity in marine intertidal communities
Environmental conditions such as sea surface temperature and the occurrence of cold water upwelling events drive the structure of interaction networks in marine intertidal communities via their effects on species richness, according to new research. (2020-08-17)

Dynamic membranes set to solve problems of liquid waste treatment
The co-authors, Associate Professor Dinar Fazullin and Associate Professor Gennady Mavrin, have been engaged in the topic of membrane elements for water purification for ten years. This research area is very pertinent because of the large volumes of liquid waste and a lack of specialized types of membranes. (2020-08-14)

Third breakthrough demonstrates photosynthetic hacks can boost yield, conserve water
Plants are factories that manufacture yield from light and carbon dioxide--but parts of this complex process, called photosynthesis, are hindered by a lack of raw materials and machinery. To optimize production, scientists from the University of Essex have resolved two major photosynthetic bottlenecks to boost plant productivity by 27 percent in real-world field conditions, according to a new study published in Nature Plants. This photosynthetic hack has also been shown to conserve water. (2020-08-10)

Success in promoting plant growth for biodiesel
Scientists of Waseda University in Japan succeeded in promoting plant growth and increasing seed yield by heterologous expression of protein from Arabidopsis (artificially modified high-speed motor protein) in Camelina sativa, which is expected as a useful plant for biodiesel. The study is expected to apply to other plant resources for biodiesel, such as corn, rice, and sugar cane. (2020-08-07)

"Ample evidence" that Cape Hatteras beach closures benefit birds
The National Park Service (NPS) requested that the American Ornithological Society (AOS) assemble an expert panel to produce an independent report assessing the appropriateness of the current NPS beach management plan for the barrier islands of North Carolina's Cape Hatteras National Seashore. In this new report, AOS finds evidence that, despite complaints from the public, the restrictions on recreational use provide significant benefits for vulnerable beach-nesting birds and sea turtles. (2020-08-06)

Study sheds new light on vein formation in plants
An international team of researchers including the University of Adelaide, has found plant hormones known as strigolactones suppress the transportation of auxin, the main plant hormone involved in vein formation, so that vein formation occurs slower and with greater focus. (2020-08-05)

Scientists discover secret behind Earth's biodiversity hotspots
Researchers have discovered why the tropics and a handful of other areas across the globe have become the most biodiverse places on the planet. (2020-08-03)

Reduced coral reef fish biodiversity under temperatures that mirror climate predictions
A team of researchers, led by Simon Brandl and Jacob Johansen, recently studied cryptobenthic reef fishes in the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman and found that the more thermally extreme coral reef habitat in the Arabian Gulf adversely impacted the diversity and productivity of these important fishes. (2020-07-31)

Solving the jigsaw puzzle of regional carbon budgets
Ciais and colleagues obtained the first bottom-up global land carbon budget from the sum of regional estimates, combining inventories with lateral transfers from the trade of wood and food products and the export of dissolved carbon by rivers to the oceans. Carbon being moved away from ecosystems by lateral fluxes and emitted by fires and as reduced compounds is a large fraction of primary production inputs, implying a smaller CO2 emission from soil microbial decomposition. (2020-07-24)

Heat stress in gestating dairy cows impairs performance of future generations
In a recent article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from the University of Florida and the University of California, Davis investigated the performance and profitability of two future generations of cows born to mothers exposed to heat stress during pregnancy. (2020-07-16)

Examine narratives to end policy deadlock, boost agricultural development in Africa, economists say
Impasse over dominant and counter approaches-- state-led or market-led policy-- to promote agricultural development in Africa could be solved by analyzing the one-sided narratives that shape this dichotomy. (2020-07-13)

Farmers' climate change conundrum: Low yields or revenue instability
Climate change will leave some farmers with a difficult conundrum, according to a new study by researchers from Cornell University and Washington State University: Either risk more revenue volatility, or live with a more predictable decrease in crop yields. (2020-07-10)

Construction: How to turn 36 seconds into USD 5.4 billion
A team of researchers from Aarhus University have, for the first time ever, linked 40 years of productivity data from the construction industry with the actual work done. The results show that productivity in the construction industry has been declining since the 1970s. The results also explain the decline and how to achieve far more efficient construction in North America and Europe. The study has just been published in the scientific journal Construction Engineering and Management. (2020-07-10)

Montana State research on plant chemistry published in Global Change Biology
Jack Brookshire's work examines the climate and ecological causes of increased plant productivity in the Northern Great Plains. (2020-07-10)

Chinook salmon declines related to changes in freshwater conditions
A new University of Alaska-led study provides the first evidence that declines in many of Alaska's chinook salmon populations can be attributed in part to climate-driven changes in their freshwater habitats. (2020-07-09)

Global success for Canadian companies depends on prior R&D investment, receptiveness to new learning
Canadian companies that go international are known to be more productive and successful than those that don't. New research has quantified the reasons why. (2020-07-06)

Machine learning has a flaw; it's gullible
Research forthcoming in Strategic Management Journal explores potential biases that limit the effectiveness of ML process technologies and the scope for human capital to be complementary in reducing such biases. (2020-06-23)

Mysterious climate change
New research findings underline the crucial role that sea ice throughout the Southern Ocean played for atmospheric CO2 in times of rapid climate change in the past. An international team with the participation of the University of Bonn has shown that the seasonal growth and destruction of sea ice in a warming world increases the biological productivity of the seas around Antarctica by extracting carbon from the atmosphere and storing it in the deep ocean. (2020-06-22)

AI goes underground: root crop growth predicted with drone imagery
Root crops like cassava, carrots and potatoes are notoriously good at hiding disease, or deficiencies which might affect their growth. While leaves may look green and healthy, farmers can face nasty surprises when they go to harvest their crop. New research using machine learning and to help predict root growth and health with aboveground imagery was published June 14 in Plant Methods. (2020-06-17)

Working in the sun -- heating of the head may markedly affect safety and performance
Prolonged exposure of the head to strong sunlight significantly impairs cognitively dominated functions and coordination of complex motor tasks shows a new study from the Heat-Shield project coordinated by researchers from Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at University of Copenhagen. This may have important implications for work safety and productivity. (2020-06-16)

Improved heat-resistant wheat varieties are identified
An international study, including researchers at the University of Cordoba, analyzed 54 genetically improved wheat genotypes from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in order to determine which respond best to high temperatures (2020-06-16)

Effects of potassium fertilization in pear trees
Potassium fertilization effects on quality, economics, and yield in pear orchard. (2020-06-11)

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