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Current Progenitor cells News and Events, Progenitor cells News Articles.
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Genes related to down syndrome abnormalities may protect against solid tumors
Scientists from Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. (2020-08-06)
Consumption of a blueberry enriched diet by women for six weeks alters determinants of human muscle progenitor cell function
A new research study, published in the Journal of Nutrition, investigated how serum from subjects consuming a diet enriched with blueberries would affect the cells responsible for muscle growth and repair. (2020-08-05)
Cell diversity in the embryo
Epigenetic factors control the development of an organism. (2020-08-04)
Cell competition in the thymus is crucial in a healthy organism
The study published in Cell Reports demonstrates that the development of T lymphocytes lays on the coordination of signals followed by cells in order to ensure the maintenance of a healthy organism. (2020-07-30)
Researchers discover stem cells in optic nerve that preserve vision
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have for the first time identified stem cells in the region of the optic nerve, which transmits signals from the eye to the brain. (2020-07-30)
The stars that time forgot
Scientists led by astronomers at the University of Sydney and Carnegie Observatories have found the remnant of strange dismembered globular cluster at the edge of the Milky Way, upending theories about how heavy elements formed in early stars. (2020-07-29)
A safer cell therapy harnesses patient T cells to fight multiple myeloma
A treatment for multiple myeloma that harnesses the body's cancer-fighting T cells was safe in humans and showed preliminary signs of effectiveness, according to a clinical trial involving 23 patients with relapsed or treatment-resistant disease. (2020-07-29)
Mouse study shows spinal cord injury causes bone marrow failure syndrome
Research conducted at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine found that spinal cord injuries in mice cause an acquired bone marrow failure syndrome that may contribute to chronic immune dysfunction. (2020-07-24)
SARS-CoV-2 infection of non-neuronal cells, not neurons, may drive loss of smell in patients with COVID-19
A new study of human olfactory cells has revealed that viral invasion of supportive cells in the nasal cavity might be driving the loss of smell seen in some patients with COVID-19. (2020-07-24)
How breast cancer cells sneak past local immune defenses
Breast cancer cells grow locally, then metastasize throughout the body. (2020-07-15)
Deconstructing glioblastoma complexity reveals its pattern of development
Brain cancers have long been thought of as being resistant to treatments because of the presence of multiple types of cancer cells within each tumor. (2020-07-08)
A bioartificial system acts as 'dialysis' for failing livers in pigs
A bioartificial system that incorporates enhanced liver cells can act as an analogous form of dialysis for the liver in pigs, effectively carrying out the organ's detoxifying roles and preventing further liver damage in animals with acute liver failure. (2020-07-08)
Blocking cholesterol storage could stop growth of pancreatic tumors
Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory found they can stop the growth of pancreatic cancer cells by interfering with the way the cells store cholesterol. (2020-07-07)
Long-term culture of human pancreatic slices reveals regeneration of beta cells
Scientists from the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have developed a method allowing for the long-term culture of 'pancreatic slices' to study the regeneration of the human pancreas in real time. (2020-07-01)
How stress affects bone marrow
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified the protein CD86 as a novel marker of infection- and inflammation-induced hematopoietic responses. (2020-06-30)
SARS-CoV-2-attacking T cells found in 10 COVID-19 patients and 2 uninfected controls
Patients suffering from severe respiratory symptoms as a result of SARS-CoV-2 infection can rapidly generate virus-attacking T cells, and can increase this production over time, suggests a new study of T cells from 10 COVID-19 patients under intensive care treatment. (2020-06-26)
Pulse pressure: A game changer in the fight against dementia
Researchers unravel a pulse-pressure-induced pathway of dementia providing a new understanding on the pathogenesis of dementia. (2020-06-24)
Blood cell mutations linked to leukemias are inevitable as we age
A new study by researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science in Japan reports differences in blood cell mutations between Japanese and European populations. (2020-06-24)
Slow release of two chemicals protects the heart after experimental heart attacks
A novel treatment reduces heart damage after serious heart attacks in two animal models. (2020-06-22)
Study sheds light on why retinal ganglion cells are vulnerable to glaucoma
Millions of sufferers of glaucoma might someday benefit from a study released in STEM CELLS in which a ''disease in a dish'' stem cell model was used to examine the mechanism in glaucoma that causes retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to degenerate, resulting in loss of vision. (2020-06-18)
Human brain size gene triggers bigger brain in monkeys
Dresden and Japanese researchers show that a human-specific gene causes a larger neocortex in the common marmoset, a non-human primate. (2020-06-18)
Call for caution for using a CAR-T immunotherapy against acute myeloid leukemia
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute prove that the preclinical implementation of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia immunotherapy, based on CD123-redirected CAR T-cells, affects hematopoiesis, blood cells production, and reconstitution. (2020-06-17)
Tuberculosis vaccine strengthens immune system
A tuberculosis vaccine developed 100 years ago also makes vaccinated persons less susceptible to other infections. (2020-06-15)
Prodigiosin-based solution has selective activity against cancer cells
Together with colleagues from the University of Palermo, KFU employees offer a nano preparation based on biocompatible halloysite nanotubes and bacterial pigment prodigiosin; the latter is known to selectively disrupt cancer cells without damaging the healthy ones. (2020-06-12)
CNIC researchers discover a system essential for limb formation during embryonic development
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have identified a system that tells embryonic cells where they are in a developing organ (2020-06-03)
Process behind the organ-specific elimination of chromosomes in plants unveiled
Commonly, each somatic cell in an organism holds the same amount of DNA. (2020-06-02)
Evolution of pandemic coronavirus outlines path from animals to humans
A team of scientists studying the origin of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that has caused the COVID-19 pandemic, found that it was especially well-suited to jump from animals to humans by shapeshifting as it gained the ability to infect human cells. (2020-05-29)
Treatment shows promise in treating deadly brain cancer
In this study, researchers investigated if specific targeting of CD133+ glioblastoma with cutting-edge immunotherapy drugs could eradicate the most aggressive subpopulation of cells in the tumor. (2020-05-27)
At the crossroads
In the bone marrow, blood stem cells via precursor cells give rise to a variety of blood cell types with various functions: white blood cells, red blood cells, or blood platelets. (2020-05-20)
Animal study shows human brain cells repair damage in multiple sclerosis
A new study shows that when specific human brain cells are transplanted into animal models of multiple sclerosis and other white matter diseases, the cells repair damage and restore function. (2020-05-19)
Study identifies group of genes with altered expression in autism
The dysregulation appeared to affect communication among neurons in the subjects of the study, which was conducted in Brazil. (2020-05-14)
Cell therapy treatment for cardiac patients with microvascular dysfunction provides enhanced quality
Trial results presented today revealed a promising therapy for patients experiencing angina due to coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD). (2020-05-14)
Cancer cells deactivate their 'Velcro' to go on the attack
To form metastases, cancer cells must be able to migrate. (2020-05-13)
Yale researchers discover how HIV hides from treatment
Even after successful antiretroviral therapy, HIV can hide dormant in a tiny number of immune system cells for decades and re-emerge to threaten the life of its host. (2020-05-13)
Nanofiber membranes transformed into 3D scaffolds
Researchers combined gas foaming and 3D molding technologies to quickly transform electrospun membranes into complex 3D shapes for biomedical applications. (2020-05-12)
Little skates could hold the key to cartilage therapy in humans
Unlike humans and other mammals, the skeletons of sharks, skates, and rays are made entirely of cartilage and they continue to grow that cartilage throughout adulthood. (2020-05-12)
UCLA scientists create first roadmap of human skeletal muscle development
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA has developed a first-of-its-kind roadmap of how human skeletal muscle develops, including the formation of muscle stem cells. (2020-05-11)
More selective elimination of leukemia stem cells and blood stem cells
Hematopoietic stem cells from a healthy donor can help patients suffering from acute leukemia. (2020-05-08)
Organoid models reveal how the COVID-19 virus infects human intestinal cells
A new analysis of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, reveals that the pathogen can infect and replicate in cells that line the inside of the human intestines. (2020-05-01)
Novel method produces life-saving T cells from mesenchymal stromal cells
A new study released today in STEM CELLS suggests for the first time that regulatory T-cells (Treg) induced by mesenchymal stromal cells can yield an abundant replacement for naturally occurring T-cells, which are vital in protecting the body from infection. (2020-04-30)
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