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Russian developers created a platform for self-testing of AI medical services
Experts from the Center for Diagnostics and Telemedicine have developed a platform for self-testing services which is based on artificial intelligence and designed for medical tasks, such as for analyzing diagnostic images. (2020-08-07)
Tech sector job interviews assess anxiety, not software skills
A new study finds that the technical interviews currently used in hiring for many software engineering positions test whether a job candidate has performance anxiety rather than whether the candidate is competent at coding. (2020-07-14)
What ethical models for autonomous vehicles don't address - and how they could be better
There's a fairly large flaw in the way that programmers are currently addressing ethical concerns related to artificial intelligence and autonomous vehicles (AVs). (2020-07-06)
The first intuitive programming language for quantum computers
Several technical advances have been achieved recently in the pursuit of powerful quantum computers. (2020-06-15)
From digital to optical
Scientists have demonstrated how to create, using a femtosecond laser, an all-optical switch based on a metal-organic framework which can be synthesized in vitro and is usually used in chemistry for gas absorption. (2020-05-18)
Novel research speeds up threat detection, prevention for Army missions
Threat detection and prevention are essential to ensuring the safety and security of warfighters. (2020-05-04)
New AI enables teachers to rapidly develop intelligent tutoring systems
Intelligent tutoring systems have been shown to be effective in helping to teach certain subjects, such as algebra or grammar, but creating these computerized systems is difficult and laborious. (2020-04-30)
Bargain-hunting for biodiversity
The best bargains for conserving some of the world's most vulnerable salamanders and other vertebrate species can be found in Central Texas and the Appalachians, according to new conservation tools developed at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2020-03-16)
Caffeine boosts problem-solving ability but not creativity, study indicates
Want to boost creativity? Caffeine may not be the way to go according to a news study by U of A psychologist Darya Zabelina. (2020-03-05)
Speak math, not code
Writing algorithms in mathematics rather than code is not only more elegant but also more efficient, says 2013 Turing Award winner Leslie Lamport. (2020-03-01)
Occupational gender bias prevalent in online images, Rutgers study finds
Rutgers researchers say gender bias and stereotypes corresponding to certain occupations are prevalent on digital and social media platforms. (2020-02-03)
Unveiling a new map that reveals the hidden personalities of jobs
It's been long been believed that different personalities align better with different jobs. (2019-12-16)
AI could offer warnings about serious side effects of drug-drug interactions
Researchers at Penn State have developed a machine learning system that may be able to warn doctors and patients about possible negative side effects that might occur when drugs are mixed. (2019-10-15)
Uncovering the hidden 'noise' that can kill qubits
MIT and Dartmouth College researchers have demonstrated, for the first time, a tool that detects new characteristics of environmental 'noise' that can destroy the fragile quantum state of qubits, the fundamental components of quantum computers. (2019-09-16)
Software companies follow the skills and move where the staff are
Software companies are more likely to base their operations in locations where skilled potential recruits already work -- rather than staff moving to new areas for fresh opportunities. (2019-09-10)
What artificial intelligence can teach us about proteins
Proteins are vital parts of all living organisms and perform essential tasks in our bodies. (2019-05-15)
Computer scientists create reprogrammable molecular computing system
Caltech researchers have designed self-assembling DNA molecules with unprecedented reprogrammability. (2019-03-20)
Study reveals the hidden contributions of women to a branch of science
A new study by San Francisco State University researchers shows that it's possible to reveal women's once-hidden scientific work by analyzing decades-old research papers in the field of theoretical population biology. (2019-02-07)
The good and evil of ghosts, governments, and machines
Perceptions of morality in non-people to be discussed at Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Convention in Portland, Oregon. (2019-02-06)
Hunt for interesting metabolites with the antiSMASH database
Scientists who treasure hunt for interesting bacterial metabolites using the online tool antiSMASH now have the opportunity to use an antiSMASH database with pre-calculated results of nearly 25,000 bacterial genomes. (2018-11-07)
Artificial intelligence bot trained to recognize galaxies
Researchers have taught an artificial intelligence program used to recognize faces on Facebook to identify galaxies in deep space. (2018-10-31)
Artificial neural network now capable of finding medication complaints in social networks
'Cannot get asleep all night', 'a little giddy' and other complaints in social networks can now be translated into formal medical terms, such as insomnia or vertigo. (2018-09-17)
Men place less value on care-oriented careers like nursing: UBC study
Men assign less importance to care-oriented careers than women do, possibly because men internalize different values than women, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia. (2018-08-20)
An immigrant workforce leads to innovation, according to new UC San Diego research
New federal restrictions on the temporary H-1B visa, which allows high-skilled foreign workers to be employed by U.S. companies, have increased debate on the economic impacts of the program, but little is known about its effect on product innovation -- until now. (2018-07-16)
Citizen scientists developing expertise on galaxy images
Two researchers from the University of Gothenburg have studied large amounts of data in a citizen science project that turns to volunteers for help classifying images of galaxies. (2018-06-25)
A system purely for developing high-performance, big data codes
PlinyCompute, a big data platform designed specifically for developing high-performance and data-intensive codes, will be unveiled by Rice University computer scientists at this week's 2018 ACM SIGMOD conference in Houston. (2018-06-11)
It takes a village
A handmade super-microscope -- capable of seeing the actual building blocks of a bacterial cell wall -- has helped Monash researchers decipher how bacteria are able to literally build a wall against the immune system, leading to often deadly disease. (2018-05-29)
Rice U. turns deep-learning AI loose on software development
Computer scientists at Rice University have created a deep-learning, software-coding application that can help human programmers by writing chunks of code in response to keywords. (2018-04-25)
The thermodynamics of computing
Information processing requires a lot of energy. Energy-saving computer systems could make computing more efficient, but the efficiency of these systems can't be increased indefinitely, as ETH physicists show. (2018-04-11)
ASU Online science course brings to life a new way of teaching
Arizona State University's School of Earth and Space Exploration recently released new research on its flagship Smart Course, Habitable Worlds, published in the peer-reviewed journal, Astrobiology. (2018-04-05)
Metagenomic analysis software reveals new causes of superbug emergence
Researchers from ITMO University and Center of Physical and Chemical Medicine developed an algorithm capable of tracking the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in gut microbiota DNA and revealed additional evidence of resistance genes transfer between different bacterial species. (2017-11-09)
Kent State professor receives NSF grant to develop eye-tracking software
Jonathan Maletic, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Computer Science in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, has received a three-year, $290,610 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to help support basic research on how programmers write and develop large-scale software systems. (2017-10-24)
New techniques boost performance of non-volatile memory systems
Computer engineering researchers have developed new software and hardware designs that should limit programming errors and improve system performance in devices that use non-volatile memory technologies. (2017-10-17)
Study finds auto-fix tool gets more programmers to upgrade code
Failure to make necessary upgrades to software code can have dire consequences, such as the major data breach at Equifax. (2017-10-16)
System automatically modifies code for transfer to other programs
Researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed a new system that allows programmers to transplant code from one program into another. (2017-09-20)
Algorithm uses Instagram posts to advise tourists on attractions most favoured by locals
Programmers from ITMO University created a computer algorithm that allows tourists to find places of interest that are most popular with locals based on their instagram posts. (2017-09-07)
Aerospace test at Sandia goes green with alternative to explosives
Sandia National Laboratories has successfully demonstrated a new, more environmentally friendly method to test a rocket part to ensure its avionics can withstand the shock from stage separation during flight. (2017-08-31)
Study finds gender bias in open-source programming
A study comparing acceptance rates of contributions from men and women in an open-source software community finds that, overall, women's contributions tend to be accepted more often than men's -- but when a woman's gender is identifiable, they are rejected more often. (2017-05-01)
Biased bots: Human prejudices sneak into artificial intelligence systems
In debates over the future of artificial intelligence, many experts think of the new systems as coldly logical and objectively rational. (2017-04-13)
Once overlooked, uninitialized-use 'bugs' may provide portal for hacker attacks on Linux
According to new Georgia Institute of Technology research, uninitialized variables -- largely overlooked bugs mostly regarded as insignificant memory errors -- are actually a critical attack vector that can be reliably exploited by hackers to launch privilege escalation attacks in the Linux kernel. (2017-03-02)
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