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Analysis pinpoints most important forests for biodiversity and conservation in Central Africa
A study by WCS and partners produced new analyses to pinpoint the most important forests for biodiversity conservation remaining in Central Africa. (2020-08-11)
New global study shows 'best of the last' tropical forests urgently need protection
The world's 'best of the last' tropical forests are at significant risk of being lost, according to a paper released today in Nature Ecology and Evolution. (2020-08-10)
NIH-Moderna investigational COVID-19 vaccine shows promise in mouse studies
The investigational vaccine known as mRNA-1273 protected mice from infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to research published today in Nature. (2020-08-05)
'Giant atoms' enable quantum processing and communication in one
MIT researchers have introduced a quantum computing architecture that can perform low-error quantum computations while also rapidly sharing quantum information between processors. (2020-07-29)
Popular seafood species in sharp decline around the world
The first-ever global study of long-term trends in the population biomass of exploited marine fish and invertebrates for all coastal areas on the planet. (2020-07-21)
Working on the frontier of nanoparticle research
The Computer-Aided Nano and Energy Lab (CANELa) at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering is advancing the field of nanoparticle research, modeling metal nanoclusters that are atomically precise in structure. (2020-07-21)
Antarctica more widely impacted by humans than previously thought
Using a data set of 2.7 million human activity records, the team showed just how extensive human use of Antarctica has been over the last 200 years (2020-07-17)
A call to arms: Enlisting private land owners in conservation
In 1872 the United States created Yellowstone, the first National Park in the world. (2020-07-17)
Scientists identify new species of sea sponge off the coast of British Columbia, Canada
A UAlberta research team has published a study on the discovery of a new sponge that is abundant in the region, making up nearly 20 per cent of the live sponges in the reefs off the coast of British Columbia. (2020-07-16)
Antarctica more widely impacted than previously thought
Researchers at Australia's Monash University, using a data set of 2.7 million human activity records, have shown just how extensive human use of Antarctica has been over the last 200 years. (2020-07-15)
COVID-19 and Brexit can help with the recovery of UK fish stocks
The United Kingdom has a unique opportunity to start rebuilding its fish stocks by taking advantage of the slowdown in commercial fishing caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing Brexit negotiations, new research has shown. (2020-07-13)
The restoration of forests with active rapid 'Ohi'a death infections may be possible
Positive news for 'ohi'a restoration in Hawai'i! A new USGS study indicates that 'ohi'a seedlings planted into sites with active Rapid 'Ohi'a Death (ROD) infections can survive for at least one year. (2020-07-09)
The story behind a uniquely dark, wetland soil
Areas where landslides are common make hydric soil identification tricky. (2020-07-08)
"Protect 30% of the planet for nature," scientists urge in new report
A new report entitled, ''Protecting 30% of the planet for nature: costs, benefits, and economic implications,'' represents the first multi-sector analysis that assesses the global impacts of terrestrial and marine protected areas across the nature conservation, agriculture, forestry, and fisheries sectors. (2020-07-08)
Study reveals many great lakes state parks impacted by record-high water levels
UToledo student Eric Kostecky zeroed in on how coastal flooding and erosion in 2019 damaged park facilities, boat launches and roads and interrupted visitor experiences. (2020-07-07)
Long-term consequences of river damming in the Panama Canal
Humans have manipulated and managed rivers with dams for millennia. (2020-07-03)
Historic floods reveal how salt marshes can save lives in the future
By digging into major historic records of flood disasters, a research team led by scientists from the Royal Netherland Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Delft University of Technology, Deltares and Antwerp University, reveal in a publication this week in Nature Sustainability that the value of nature for flood defense has actually been evident for hundreds of years. (2020-06-29)
Adirondack boreal peatlands near southern range limit likely threatened by warmer climate
A study published in the journal Wetlands documents an invasion happening in the Adirondacks: the black spruce, tamarack, and other boreal species are being overcome by trees normally found in warmer, more temperate forests. (2020-06-24)
An environmental warning system to monitor the coast
This technique acts a warning of incidents of a local nature, such as water pollution from poorly treated urban wastewater discharges; or of a more global nature, which become evident by monitoring climate change through species that are sensitive to temperature increases; or incidents caused by the intrusion of potential invasive species. (2020-06-23)
Protecting natural forest in oil palm plantations crucial for conservation
A study, led by the University of York, has found that patches of protected forest on oil palm plantations play an important role in helping to conserve endangered species including hornbill birds and dipterocarp trees. (2020-06-22)
Are protected areas effective at maintaining large carnivore populations?
A recent study, led by the University of Helsinki, used a novel combination of statistical methods and an exceptional data set collected by hunters to assess the role of protected areas for carnivore conservation in Finland. (2020-06-22)
Support drives fate of protected gold nanoclusters as catalysts
In collaboration with experimentalists from Ghent University, Belgium and Utrecht University, Netherlands, researchers at the Nanoscience Center (NSC) at the University of Jyväskylä, have recently discovered that the choice of a support material for model catalysts, made from gold nanoclusters protected by organic molecules, may have drastic effects on the structure of the catalyst. (2020-06-16)
Half the earth relatively intact from global human influence
If we act quickly and decisively, there is a slim window in which we can still conserve roughly half of Earth's land in a relatively intact state, a UC Davis study suggests. (2020-06-11)
Protected areas worldwide at risk of invasive species
Protected areas across the globe are effectively keeping invasive animals at bay, but the large majority of them are at risk of invasions, finds a involving UCL and led by the Chinese Academy of Science, in a study published in Nature Communications. (2020-06-08)
Blood markers predict Humboldt penguin nest type, reproductive success
In a new study, researchers looked at metabolic markers in the blood of 30 Humboldt penguins nesting in the Punta San Juan Marine Protected Area in Peru. (2020-06-02)
Report on New Caledonia's coral reefs offers a glimmer of hope for the future
The latest report from Global Reef Expedition scientists provides a promising assessment of coral reef health and resiliency in New Caledonia. (2020-06-01)
Public parks guaranteeing sustainable well-being
An international team led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE) has ascertained how green spaces contribute to the well-being of city-dwellers. (2020-05-27)
The deep ocean is warming slowly -- but dramatic changes are ahead
The world's deep oceans are warming at a slower rate than the surface, but it's still not good news for deep-sea creatures according to an international study. (2020-05-25)
There is no escaping from climate change, even in the deep sea
Even though the deeper layers of the ocean are warming at a slower pace than the surface, animals living in the deep ocean are more exposed to climate warming and will face increasing challenges to maintain their preferred thermal habitats in the future. (2020-05-25)
Macaques show protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2 after infection or after vaccine
Two new studies in macaques offer hope that humans could develop protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2, either as the result of a natural infection or by way of a vaccine. (2020-05-20)
Virus prevalence associated with habitat
Levels of virus infection in lobsters seem to be related to habitat and other species, new studies of Caribbean marine protected areas have shown. (2020-05-20)
Reptile poaching in Balochistan (Pakistan) is on a decreasing trend but still troublesome
Since 2013, following strict enforcement of provincial wildlife legislation in the less studied regions of Asia, the overall trend of illegal reptile poaching is steadily decreasing. (2020-05-14)
Belt and Road's financiers fall short on biodiversity
Most financiers of international infrastructure program, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), are falling short on biodiversity safeguards, according to University of Queensland research. (2020-05-11)
URI professor: Climate change increases risk of fisheries conflict
A team of experts, led by a University of Rhode Island researcher, examined how climate change is affecting the ocean environment and found that the changing conditions will likely result in increased fisheries-related conflicts and create new challenges in the management of global fisheries. (2020-05-04)
Ecotourism transforms attitudes to marine conservation
A study has shown how ecotourism in the Philippines has transformed people's attitudes towards marine conservation. (2020-05-04)
Stopping deforestation: lessons from Colombia
A study of deforestation in Colombia by researchers from The University of Queensland has revealed some valuable insights which could be used to help slow deforestation in areas around the globe. (2020-05-01)
Cracking the Lyme disease code
The next time a tick feeds on you, Washington State University researchers hope to make sure persistent arthritis caused by Lyme disease doesn't linger for a lifetime. (2020-04-30)
A study places the origin of a group of trees growing in Africa 50 million years ago
The research looked into the evolution of the Daniellia clade, a set of trees with environmental importance, and confirms that more than half its species are endangered (2020-04-29)
Thousands of miles of planned Asian roads threaten the heart of tiger habitat
Nearly 15,000 miles of new Asian roads will be built in tiger habitat by mid-century, deepening the big cat's extinction risk and highlighting the need for bold new conservation measures now, according to a new study. (2020-04-29)
Warming climate undoes decades of knowledge of marine protected areas
A new study highlights that tropical coral reef marine reserves can offer little defence in the face of climate change impacts. (2020-04-24)
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