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Current Protected areas News and Events, Protected areas News Articles.
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Threatened species habitat destruction shows federal laws are broken
Human activities have destroyed more than 7.7 million hectares of threatened species habitat, revealing critical failures with Australia's federal environmental protection laws. (2019-09-09)
Underwater soundscapes reveal differences in marine environments
Storms, boat traffic, animal noises and more contribute to the underwater sound environment in the ocean, even in areas considered protected. (2019-09-04)
What if we paid countries to protect biodiversity?
Researchers from Sweden, Germany, Brazil and the USA have developed a financial mechanism to support the protection of the world's natural heritage. (2019-08-30)
Crouching lion, hidden giraffe
The behavior of giraffe groups with calves is influenced more strongly by the risk of predators than is the behavior of all-adult groups, which is mostly determined by the availability of food. (2019-08-29)
How changes in land use could reduce the browning of lakes
Over the past 50 years, the water in lakes and watercourses has turned increasingly brown. (2019-08-29)
Grassland biodiversity is blowing in the wind
Temperate grasslands are the most endangered but least protected ecosystems on Earth. (2019-08-28)
Satellite-based estimates of reduced deforestation in protected areas needed
In the context of progressing towards new targets for a post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework, the debate remains on whether the emphasis should be on protected area coverage or protected area effectiveness. (2019-08-27)
Memory T cells shelter in bone marrow, boosting immunity in mice with restricted diets
Even when taking in fewer calories and nutrients, humans and other mammals usually remain protected against infectious diseases they have already encountered. (2019-08-22)
More frequent wildfires in the boreal forest threaten previously protected soil carbon
University of Saskatchewan researchers have found that as major wildfires increase in Canada's North, boreal forests that have acted as carbon sinks for millennia are becoming sources of atmospheric carbon, potentially contributing to the greenhouse effect. (2019-08-21)
Boreal forest fires could release deep soil carbon
Increasingly frequent and severe forest fires could burn generations-old carbon stored in the soils of boreal forests, according to results from the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) funded by NASA's Earth Science Division. (2019-08-21)
Research bias may leave some primates at risk
Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Santa Clara University. (2019-08-14)
Rare antelopes and black cats
Numerous large mammals have been documented with video traps on Mount Kilimanjaro by a research group of Würzburg University. (2019-08-14)
Forest fragments surprising havens for wildlife
Researchers conducted camera trap surveys within Sumatra's Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park and five surrounding remnant forest fragments, finding 28 mammal species in the protected forest and 21 in the fragments -- including critically endangered species such as Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) and Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), along with species of conservation concern such as marbled cat (Pardofelis marmorata) and Asiatic golden cat (Pardofelis temminckii). (2019-08-08)
Thermally stable TB vaccine closer to reality thanks to microscopic silica cages
A new method prevents crucial vaccine components from spoiling outside of a fridge -- meaning a thermally stable vaccine that can be reliably delivered to remote areas around the world is more likely. (2019-08-08)
Despite habitat protection, endangered owls decline in Mount Rainier National Park
When the Northern Spotted Owl was protected under the Endangered Species Act in 1990, the primary threat to the species was the loss of old-growth forest. (2019-08-08)
Depleted seamounts near Hawaii recovering after decades of federal protection
After years of federally mandated protection, scientists see signs that this once ecologically fertile area known as the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain is making a comeback. (2019-08-07)
Looking out for the little guys
A new study, undertaken by a team of scientists from BIOS, the Bermuda Government Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the University of Rhode Island, used DNA markers to characterize the genetic diversity of Bermuda's baitfish populations. (2019-08-07)
Tracking baby fish for better reef management
Scientists have created the world's first computer model to predict the movements of baby coral trout across the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-07-31)
Gibbons' large, long-term territories put them under threat from habitat loss
Wild gibbons living in the peat swamps of southern Borneo require between 20 and 50 hectares of forest territory for each group, making their populations particularly vulnerable to habitat loss, according to a study publishing July 31 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dr. (2019-07-31)
UNH research finds shale natural gas development impacting recreationists
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire took a closer look at shale natural gas energy development (SGD) and how it is affecting the experiences of outdoor recreationists, like hikers and campers. (2019-07-31)
Biodiversity highest on Indigenous-managed lands
More than one million plant and animal species worldwide are facing extinction, according to a recent United Nations report. (2019-07-31)
New paper points to soil pore structure as key to carbon storage
Alexandra Kravchenko, Michigan State University professor in the Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, and several of her colleagues recently discovered a new mechanism determining how carbon is stored in soils that could improve the climate resilience of cropping systems and also reduce their carbon footprints. (2019-07-26)
Shark hotspots under worldwide threat from overfishing
In a groundbreaking new study published in the journal Nature, an international team of over 150 scientists from 26 countries combined movement data from nearly 2,000 sharks tracked with satellite tags. (2019-07-25)
Scientists complete first assessment of blood abnormalities in Antarctic penguin colony
Through blood tests conducted on 19 adult Adélie penguins breeding at Edmonson Point in Antarctica, researchers found quantities of cell types associated with future cell death, genomic instability or cancer development. (2019-07-24)
Sustainable land management key to reducing Amazon wildfires, study shows
The unrelenting deforestation of the Amazon region could lead to a dramatic increase to the risk of destructive wildfire outbreaks, research has shown. (2019-07-19)
Tornadoes, windstorms pave way for lasting plant invasions
When tornadoes touch down, we brace for news of property damage, injuries, and loss of life, but the high-speed wind storms wreak environmental havoc, too. (2019-07-18)
Study reveals unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest
Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon. (2019-07-18)
Protein oxidation reveals the environmental pollution level in Doñana National Park
A Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology team at the University of Cordoba assessed the environmental pollution of Doñana National Park by means of its effects on mice that dwell in the area. (2019-07-17)
Protected area designation effective in reducing, but not preventing, land cover changes
The designation of protected areas in Europe has been effective in reducing, but not completely preventing, land cover changes associated with human activity, according to a study published July 17, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Niels Hellwig of Potsdam University and Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences in Germany, and colleagues. (2019-07-17)
Protecting a forgotten treasure trove of biodiversity
The lesser-known Cerrado biome in Brazil is a hotspot of biodiversity, but it is being destroyed at an alarming rate by unsustainable agricultural activities. (2019-07-17)
Do marine protected areas work?
A study describes how to use data collected before and after Marine Protected Areas are created to verify that they work. (2019-07-17)
Limits on pot fishing can result in win-win for fishermen and marine wildlife
The first major study into the impact of inshore potting for crab and lobster within a Marine Protected Area has found that in areas of low potting intensity the industry is operating in a way that had little impact on seabed species or economically-important shellfish. (2019-07-16)
The path to China's 'ecological civilization' starts with national parks
President Xi Jinping staked out China's role as a committed player to tackle the climate crisis and build an 'ecological civilization.' In a review published July 10 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers discuss one of the Chinese government's efforts -- reforming the management of protected areas by streamlining agencies' responsibilities and reducing functional overlaps. (2019-07-10)
Scientists see how a protein preserves vision in a unique group of diabetic patients
An analysis of samples obtained from a well-studied cohort of over 1,000 patients affected by type 1 diabetes (T1D) for 50 years or longer has identified a protein that protects against an eye condition called diabetic retinopathy (DR) -- one of the most common consequences of diabetes -- which impacts most diabetic patients after 20 years of living with the disease. (2019-07-03)
Holy crocodiles
Sebastian Brackhane of the University of Freiburg has researched the cultural status of the reptiles in East Timor. (2019-07-02)
Few US higher education campuses have gone completely smoke and/or tobacco-free
Just one in six accredited US colleges and universities have gone completely smoke and/or tobacco free, reveals the first study of its kind, published in the journal Tobacco Control. (2019-07-02)
How to protect corals facing climate change
The best way to protect corals threatened by climate change is to conserve a wide range of their habitats, according to a study in Nature Climate Change. (2019-07-01)
Global agriculture: Impending threats to biodiversity
A new study compares the effects of expansion vs. intensification of cropland use on global agricultural markets and biodiversity, and finds that the expansion strategy poses a particularly serious threat to biodiversity in the tropics. (2019-06-28)
To increase bike commuters, look to neighborhoods
People agree that bike commuting improves health, reduces air pollution and eases traffic, a recent survey suggests. (2019-06-26)
Gold for silver: A chemical barter
From effective medicines to molecular sensors to fuel cells, metal clusters are becoming fundamentally useful in the health, environment, and energy sectors. (2019-06-20)
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