Current Protein synthesis News and Events

Current Protein synthesis News and Events, Protein synthesis News Articles.
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A chemist from RUDN University synthesized analogs of natural toxins
A chemist from RUDN University suggested a simple and accurate method for the synthesis of analogs of two natural toxins, antofine and septicine. This universal approach can also be used to obtain other biologically active substances for medicinal chemistry. (2020-11-23)

Proteins in motion
Membrane proteins are more efficient at reaching distal dendrites than soluble proteins (2020-11-21)

Highly efficient, long-lasting electrocatalyst to boost hydrogen fuel production
The IBS research team developed a highly efficient and long-lasting electrocatalyst for water oxidation using cobalt, iron, and a minimal amount of ruthenium. (2020-11-20)

A biochemical random number
ETH Zurich scientists have generated a huge true random number using DNA synthesis. It is the first time that a number of this magnitude has been created by biochemical means. (2020-11-20)

Ribosome assembly - The final trimming step
Ribosomes synthesize all the proteins in cells. Studies mainly done on yeast have revealed much about how ribosomes are put together, but an Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team now reports that ribosome assembly in human cells requires factors that have no counterparts in simpler model organisms. (2020-11-20)

Supramolecular chemistry - Self-constructed folded macrocycles with low symmetry
The synthesis and self-organization of biological macromolecules is essential for life on earth. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich chemists now report the spontaneous emergence of complex ring-shaped macromolecules with low degrees of symmetry in the laboratory. (2020-11-20)

Folding of SARS-CoV2 genome reveals drug targets -- and preparation for 'SARS-CoV3'
For the first time, an international research alliance has observed the RNA folding structures of the SARS-CoV2 genome with which the virus controls the infection process. Since these structures are very similar among various beta corona viruses, the scientists not only laid the foundation for the targeted development of novel drugs for treating COVID-19, but also for future occurrences of infection with new corona viruses that may develop in the future. (2020-11-20)

Scientists age quantum dots in a test tube
Researchers from MIPT and the RAS Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics have proposed a simple and convenient way to obtain arbitrarily sized quantum dots required for physical experiments via chemical aging. (2020-11-19)

Fostering creativity in researchers: how automation can revolutionize materials research
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) devise a system that combines robotics and artificial intelligence to fully automate the routine aspects of synthesizing, testing, and optimizing new materials according to fabrication conditions. Their approach can produce and test compounds ten times faster than scientists doing manual work, allowing for the rapid creation of huge shared databases. In turn, the autonomous system and database will be used to discover exotic material properties and new laws of physics. (2020-11-18)

Existing antidepressant helps to inhibit growth of cancer cells in lab animals
New research has shown that the antidepressant sertraline helps to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. The substance acts on a metabolic addiction that allows different types of cancer to grow. This is shown by a study on cell cultures and lab animals by researchers at KU Leuven. (2020-11-17)

New study could help predict which individuals are more susceptible to cancer-causing agen
New insights into the mechanisms behind how cancer-causing agents in the environment activate genetic recombination in DNA could help to explain some of the effects of exposure as well as predicting which individuals may be more susceptible to developing the disease, a new UK study has suggested. (2020-11-17)

Newly discovered enzyme helps make valuable bioactive saponins
A team led by researchers from Osaka University discovered a new enzyme, closely related to the CSyGT family of enzymes involved in producing cellulose in plant cell walls. Unexpectedly, they found the new enzyme is responsible for a key step in the biosynthesis of saponins, bioactive products with high-value applications in medicine and the food industry. The new enzyme opens up novel routes for commercial production of these valuable compounds in microbial cells. (2020-11-16)

Success in controlling perovskite ions' composition paves the way for device applications
Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites have received much attention as potential next generation solar cells and as materials for light-emitting devices. Kobe University's Associate Professor TACHIKAWA Takashi (of the Molecular Photoscience Research Center) and Dr. KARIMATA Izuru (previously a graduate student engaged in research at the Graduate School of Science) have succeeded in completely substituting the halide ions of perovskite nanocrystals while maintaining their morphology and light-emitting efficiency. (2020-11-13)

Chemistry: How nitrogen is transferred by a catalyst
Catalysts with a metal-nitrogen bond can transfer nitrogen to organic molecules. In this process short-lived molecular species are formed, whose properties critically determine the course of the reaction and product formation. The key compound in a catalytic nitrogen-atom transfer reaction has now been analysed in detail by chemists at the University of Göttingen and Goethe University Frankfurt. The detailed understanding of this reaction will allow for the design of catalysts tailored for specific reactions. (2020-11-13)

Dynamic risk management in cell populations
Scientists at AMOLF and Yale report the discovery of a mechanism that enables cell populations to tune their diversity much faster, by a combination of physical and chemical interactions between existing proteins. (2020-11-13)

Illuminating tiny proteins in living cells using single-residue labeling tags
SciLifeLab Fellow Simon Elsässer laboratory at Karolinska Institutet reports a method, which allows fluorescent tagging of proteins with the small perturbation -- a single amino acid -- added genetically on either end of a (micro)protein of interest. The method is termed Single-residue Terminal Labeling, STELLA. (2020-11-12)

Cysteine synthesis was a key step in the origin of life
All proteins are built from the same 20 amino acids. One of these, cysteine, was assumed not to have been present at the origin of life. In a new study, published in Science, UCL scientists have recreated how cysteine was formed at the origins of life. Additionally, they have observed how, once formed, cysteine catalyses the fusion of peptides in water - a fundamental step in the path towards protein enzymes. (2020-11-12)

RUDN University chemists developed cheap and eco-friendly surfactants
An international team including chemists from RUDN University suggested an economically feasible and environmentally friendly method to synthesize surfactants. The new compounds can become an eco-friendly alternative to traditional chemicals used in oil production, skincare products manufacture, and in the pharmaceutical industry to transport drugs to diseased body tissues. (2020-11-12)

Selective encapsulation of ultrafine Pd and Pt nanoparticles within the shallow layers of MOF
A solvent assisted ligand exchange-hydrogen reduction (SALE-HR) strategy is demonstrated to selectively encapsulate ultrafine metal nanoparticles (Pd or Pt) within the shallow layers of a MOF, i.e., UiO-67, for highly efficient hydrogenation reactions. (2020-11-11)

How organ functions were shaped over the course of evolution
A large-scale study conducted by molecular biologists from Heidelberg University has yielded groundbreaking new insights into the evolution and regulation of gene expression in mammalian organs. The scientists investigated RNA synthesis and subsequent protein synthesis in the organs of humans and other representative mammals. They were able to demonstrate that the interplay of the two synthesis processes during evolution was crucial for shaping organ functions. (2020-11-11)

Yale scientists identify protein that protects against Lyme
Yale researchers have discovered a protein that helps protect hosts from infection with the tick-borne spirochete that causes Lyme Disease, a finding that may help diagnose and treat this infection, they report Nov. 11 in the journal PLOS Pathogens. (2020-11-11)

Hollow porphyrinic nanospheres
IBS research team developed a template-free, one-pot synthesis of a porphyrin-based gigantic organic cages composed of multi-porphyrin units. (2020-11-09)

Perspectives of infrared spectroscopy in quantitative estimation of proteins
The present review describes the basic principle and the instrumentation of IR spectroscopy along with its advancements. Beyond this, various applications of this technique in determination of protein structure and quantification in different materials such as foods stuffs, biotechnological products and biological fluids have also been summarized. (2020-11-06)

Virus that causes COVID-19 puts a plug in cellular defenses
One of the novel coronavirus' most insidious tricks is that it can block the ability of cells to produce protective proteins without hindering its own ability to replicate. A new Yale study reveals how it does it. (2020-11-05)

Stable protein decoy neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in cells and protected hamsters from viral challenge
Researchers have designed a protein 'decoy' that mimics the interface where the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein binds a human cell, one version of which could neutralize virus infection in cells and protect hamsters from viral challenge. (2020-11-05)

New multicomponent reaction frontiers
The synthesis of complex molecules such as drugs, requires a process that sometimes involves several phases that increase its cost and harden the access to the product. Now, a team of the University of Barcelona has designed a new methodological approach that combines multicomponent reactions with domino type processes -continuous transformations on an only compound- to ease the synthesis of high structural complex molecules. (2020-11-04)

Well oriented
Polypropylene (PP) is one of the most widely used plastics in the world. By controlling the spatial orientation of the propylene building blocks and additional polar components, it should be possible to create a new generation of attractive, engineered, specialty plastics, with improved wettability or enhanced degradability, based on PP. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Japanese scientists have introduced the basis for a new class of palladium catalysts for such polymerizations. (2020-10-30)

RUDN University chemist developed green method for malaria and leprosy drug production
A chemist from RUDN University suggested an eco-friendly method for the synthesis of dapsone, a substance that inhibits the growth of malaria and leprosy agents. The main component of the new reaction is hydrogen peroxide that does not form environmentally destructive compounds, and the only by-product is simple water. Unlike other technologies, this method includes only one stage of dapsone production and does not require high temperatures. The catalyst of the reaction can be reused without any loss of efficiency. (2020-10-30)

HSE Faculty of Chemistry scientists discovered new anti-cancer molecule
A group of Moscow scientists has discovered and explained the activity mechanism of a new anti-cancer molecule -- diphenylisoxazole. This molecule has been shown to be effective against human cancer cells. The research, published in the journal Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, makes it possible to produce an affordable cancer treatment drug. (2020-10-29)

Graphdiyne based metal atomic catalyst for efficient ammonia synthesis
Researchers cleverly used the rich chemical bonds, highly conjugated large π bonds, super-large surface and pore structures of graphdiyne. The graphdiyne-based zero-valent palladium atom catalyst was efficiently and controllably designed and synthesized through a simple and efficient metal ion anchoring-electron transfer - self-reduction strategy. (2020-10-28)

RUDN University chemist suggested increasing the biofuel production efficiency with silica-supported
A chemist from RUDN University developed a silica-supported heteropolyacid system to produce ethers from waste products of the wood and paper industry and agriculture. Ethers can be used as biofuels, and the new method increases the efficiency of their production 4 to 10 times, thus reducing energy consumption and making the manufacturing of biofuels cheaper. (2020-10-28)

Direct observation of a single electron's butterfly-shaped distribution in titanium oxide
A research team led by Nagoya University has observed the smeared-out spatial distribution of a single valence electron at the centre of a titanium oxide molecule, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and a new Fourier synthesis method also developed by the team. The method can determine the orbital states in materials regardless of their physical properties and without the need for difficult experiments or analytical techniques. The work was published recently in Physical Review Research. (2020-10-28)

Waiter! This soup is not fly
Black Soldier Fly larvae contains more zinc and iron than lean meat and its calcium content is higher than milk. Less than half a hectare of black soldier fly larvae can produce more protein than cattle grazing on around 1200 hectares, or 52 hectares of soybeans. New research has identified the barriers for introducing fly protein into Western human diets as a sustainable, healthy alternative to both meat and plant proteins. (2020-10-28)

Computer vision helps find binding sites in drug targets
Scientists from the iMolecule group at Skoltech developed BiteNet, a machine learning (ML) algorithm that helps find drug binding sites, i.e. potential drug targets, in proteins. BiteNet can analyze 1,000 protein structures in 1.5 minutes and find optimal spots for drug molecules to attach. (2020-10-27)

TalTech chemists' new method is a significant step towards greener pharmaceutical industry
The rapid changes in the chemical industry are connected one hand with the depletion of natural resources and deepening of environmental concerns, on the other hand with the growth of environmental awareness. Green, environmentally friendly chemistry is playing an increasingly important role in the sustainable chemical industry. (2020-10-27)

The sweet spot of flagellar assembly
To build the machinery that enables bacteria to swim the flagellum is assembled piece by piece, ending with the helix called flagellar filament, composed of six different subunits called flagellins. Microbiologists from the University of Geneva have demonstrated that adding sugar to the flagellins is crucial for the flagellum's assembly and functionality. Among the six flagellins, one is the special one serving a signalling role to trigger the final assembly of the flagellum. (2020-10-27)

RUDN University chemist created a catalyst from orange peel for organic compounds production
N-heterocycles are organic substances used in the chemical industry and medicine. To produce them, expensive catalysts made from noble metals are used. A chemist from RUDN University developed a nanocatalyst for N-heterocycles that consists of zinc oxide and niobium and can be obtained using orange peel without any additional chemical agents. The catalyst makes the reaction almost 100% effective, thus increasing the efficiency and reducing the cost of N-heterocycles production. (2020-10-23)

Chemists develop framework to enable efficient synthesis of 'information-dense' molecules
A team led by scientists at Scripps Research has developed a theoretical approach that could ease the process of making highly complex, compact molecules. Such molecules are often found in plants and other organisms, and many are considered desirable starting points for developing potential new drugs. But they also tend to be highly challenging for chemists to construct and modify in the lab--a process called synthesis. (2020-10-23)

Oxygen can do a favor to synthesize metal-organic frameworks
IBS scienetists have identified how oxygen affects the synthesis of a novel metal-organic framework. (2020-10-21)

Oncotarget: Inhibition of HAS2 and hyaluronic acid production by 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in breast
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 30 reported that genomic profiling of murine mammary tumor cells with differential VDR expression identified 35 transcripts that were altered by the 1,25D3-VDR complex including Hyaluronan Synthase-2. (2020-10-20)

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