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Current Protein News and Events, Protein News Articles.
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Researchers solve structure of 'inverted' rhodopsin
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, working with Spanish, French, and German colleagues, have determined and analyzed the high-resolution structure of a protein from the recently discovered heliorhodopsin family. (2020-04-02)
Blocking the iron transport could stop tuberculosis
The bacteria that cause tuberculosis need iron to survive. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now solved the first detailed structure of the transport protein responsible for the iron supply. (2020-04-01)
Scientists discover gene that increases risk of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from the University of British Columbia (UBC) and the Central South University (CSU) in China have for the first time identified a gene that increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. (2020-03-31)
Found in mistranslation
In a new study, scientists from Deepa Agashe's group at NCBS find that irrespective of which proteins are impacted, there is indeed a benefit to non-specific mistranslation. (2020-03-25)
Bristol team develops photosynthetic proteins for expanded solar energy conversion
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has developed a new photosynthetic protein system enabling an enhanced and more sustainable approach to solar-powered technological devices. (2020-03-24)
Coronavirus SARS-CoV2: BESSY II data accelerate drug development
A coronavirus is keeping the world in suspense. SARS-CoV-2 is highly infectious and can cause severe pneumonia (COVID-19). (2020-03-20)
Glucagon receptor structures reveal G protein specificity mechanism
A group led by WU Beili and ZHAO Qiang at the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), a group led by SUN Fei at the Institute of Biophysics of CAS, and a group led by Denise Wootten from Monash University, determined two cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of the human glucagon receptor (GCGR) in complex with its cognate agonist glucagon and distinct classes of G proteins, Gs or Gi. (2020-03-19)
Loss of protein disturbs intestinal homeostasis and can drive cancer
An international team of researchers from the University of Zurich, the University Hospital Zurich, Heidelberg and Glasgow has identified a novel function for the cell death regulating protein MCL1: It is essential in protecting the intestine against cancer development -- independent of bacterial-driven inflammation. (2020-03-18)
A more balanced protein intake can reduce age-related muscle loss
Eating more protein at breakfast or lunchtime could help older people maintain muscle mass with advancing age -- but most people eat proteins fairly unevenly throughout the day, new research at the University of Birmingham has found. (2020-03-16)
Biophysicists blend incompatible components in one nanofiber
Russian researchers showed the possibility of blending two incompatible components -- a protein and a polymer -- in one electrospun fiber. (2020-03-16)
JNK protein triggers nerve cells to withdraw their synapses when stressed
New study from Eleanor Coffey's lab at Turku Bioscience Center in Finland identifies that the JNK protein triggers nerve cells to withdraw their synapses when stressed. (2020-03-11)
Tracking down false parkers in cancer cells
In squamous cell carcinoma, a protein ensures that unneeded proteins are no longer disposed of. (2020-03-10)
Scientists find functioning amyloid in healthy brain
The generation of amyloids, a special form of fibrillar proteins, is believed to result in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. (2020-03-02)
Genetic signature boosts protein production during cell division
A research team has uncovered a genetic signature that enables cells to adapt their protein production according to their state. (2020-02-28)
New torula yeast product as digestible as fish meal in weanling pig diets
Starting weanling pigs off with the right diet can make all the difference for the health and productivity of the animal. (2020-02-21)
Colorectal cancer partner-in-crime identified
A protein that helps colorectal cancer cells spread to other parts of the body could be an effective treatment target. (2020-02-20)
New front opened in fight against common cancer driver
Australian researchers have revealed a new vulnerability in lymphomas that are driven by one of the most common cancer-causing changes in cells. (2020-02-20)
Study: Disease-causing repeats help human neurons function
Researchers found that repeats in the gene that causes Fragile X Syndrome normally regulate how and when proteins are made in neurons. (2020-02-17)
Stop or go: The cell maintains its fine motility balance with the help of tropomodulin
Tropomodulin maintains the fine balance between the protein machineries responsible for cell movement and morphogenesis. (2020-02-17)
Parkinson's disease protein structure solved inside cells using novel technique
The top contributor to familial Parkinson's disease is mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), whose large and difficult structure has finally been solved, paving the way for targeted therapies. (2020-02-15)
Scientists develop molecular 'fishing' to find individual molecules in blood
Like finding a needle in a haystack, Liviu Movileanu can find a single molecule in blood. (2020-02-15)
Simple N-terminal modification of proteins
Osaka University researchers report efficient one-step modification of protein N termini using functional molecules containing 1H-1,2,3-triazole-4-carbaldehyde (TA4C) groups. (2020-02-13)
Autophagy degrades liquid droplets, but not aggregates, of proteins
Autophagy is a mechanism through which cellular protein is degraded. (2020-02-13)
Mechanism of controlling autophagy by liquid-liquid phase separation revealed
Japanese scientists elucidated characteristics of PAS through observing the Atg protein using a fluorescence microscope and successfully reconstituted PAS in vitro. (2020-02-13)
Designer proteins
David Baker, Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Washington to speak at the AAAS 2020 session, 'Synthetic Biology: Digital Design of Living Systems.' Prof. (2020-02-07)
Putting a finger on plant stress response
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that a PHD zinc finger-like domain in SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 is essential for protein function in Arabidopsis. (2020-02-05)
Protein could offer therapeutic target for breast cancer metastasis
A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that targeting a protein known as heat shock protein 47 could be key for suppressing breast cancer metastasis. (2020-02-05)
Study identifies interaction site for serotonin type 3A and RIC-3 chaperone
Serotonin type 3A is a member of the protein superfamily known as pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. (2020-02-04)
Ancient Greek tholos-like architecture composed of archaeal proteins
Collaborative research groups discovered a unique supramolecular structure composed of hyperthermophilic archaeal proteins. (2020-02-03)
Researchers identify mechanism that triggers a rare type of muscular dystrophy
A study led by the IBB-UAB has identified the molecular mechanism through which a protein, when carrying genetic mutations associated with a rare disease known as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, type 1G, accelerates its tendency to form amyloid fibrils and finally triggers the appearance of the disease. (2020-01-29)
Protein levels in urine after acute kidney injury predict future loss of kidney function
High levels of protein in a patient's urine shortly after an episode of acute kidney injury is associated with increased risk of kidney disease progression, providing a valuable tool in predicting those at highest risk for future loss of kidney function. (2020-01-28)
White lupin: The genome of this legume has finally been sequenced
White lupin is a particularly abstemious crop, requiring very little fertiliser and producing high-protein seeds of great nutritive quality. (2020-01-27)
New aspects of globular glial tauopathy could help in the design of more effective drugs
This study, led by Dr. Isidre Ferrer, has described that protein inclusions that damage neurons and glial cells are responsible for the pathology showed by globular glial tauopathy patients. (2020-01-27)
Discovery could help slow down progression of Parkinson's disease
A collaboration between scientists at Rutgers University and Scripps Research leads to the discovery of a small molecule that may slow down or stop the progression of Parkinson's disease (2020-01-27)
West Nile virus triggers brain inflammation by inhibiting protein degradation
West Nile virus (WNV) inhibits autophagy -- an essential system that digests or removes cellular constituents such as proteins -- to induce the aggregation of proteins in infected cells, triggering cell death and brain inflammation (encephalitis), according to Hokkaido University researchers. (2020-01-23)
High-protein diets boost artery-clogging plaque, mouse study shows
High-protein diets may help people lose weight and build muscle, but a new study in mice suggests they have a down side: They lead to more plaque in the arteries. (2020-01-23)
Cell biology: All in a flash!
Scientists of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have developed a tool to eliminate essential proteins from cells with a flash of light. (2020-01-21)
Melting reveals drug targets in a living organism
Developing new medicines and understanding how they target specific organs often gives a crucial advantage in the fight against human diseases. (2020-01-20)
Deep learning, 3D technology to improve structure modeling, create better drugs
Purdue University researchers have designed a novel approach to use deep learning to better understand how proteins interact in the body - paving the way to producing accurate structure models of protein interactions involved in various diseases and to design better drugs that specifically target protein interactions. (2020-01-10)
Missing protein in brain causes behaviors mirroring autism
Scientists at Rutgers University-Newark have discovered that when a key protein needed to generate new brain cells during prenatal and early childhood development is missing, part of the brain goes haywire -- causing an imbalance in its circuitry that can lead to long-term cognitive and movement behaviors characteristic of autism spectrum disorder. (2020-01-09)
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