Current Proteins News and Events

Current Proteins News and Events, Proteins News Articles.
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Proteins in motion
Membrane proteins are more efficient at reaching distal dendrites than soluble proteins (2020-11-21)

Folding of SARS-CoV2 genome reveals drug targets -- and preparation for 'SARS-CoV3'
For the first time, an international research alliance has observed the RNA folding structures of the SARS-CoV2 genome with which the virus controls the infection process. Since these structures are very similar among various beta corona viruses, the scientists not only laid the foundation for the targeted development of novel drugs for treating COVID-19, but also for future occurrences of infection with new corona viruses that may develop in the future. (2020-11-20)

Study: How saliva is made
In the TV series, 'How It's Made,' viewers often discover that common objects like pencils or rubber bands are quite complicated to make. The show walks people through complex production processes that lie behind familiar items. A new paper in Cell Reports does the same for saliva, breaking down, in detail, where the multitude of proteins floating in our saliva originate. (2020-11-17)

Illuminating tiny proteins in living cells using single-residue labeling tags
SciLifeLab Fellow Simon Elsässer laboratory at Karolinska Institutet reports a method, which allows fluorescent tagging of proteins with the small perturbation -- a single amino acid -- added genetically on either end of a (micro)protein of interest. The method is termed Single-residue Terminal Labeling, STELLA. (2020-11-12)

Nothing but the truth in the fight against cancer
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that TruB1, a protein known to be involved in RNA modification, can directly bind to and promote the maturation of the microRNA let-7. This novel function of TruB1 can also reduce rates of cell proliferation. This unique anti-cancer role of this protein is crucial information that will assist with the development of novel cancer therapeutics. (2020-11-09)

Peering under the "hood" of SARS-CoV-2
Microscope and protein data are incorporated into an easy-to-use-and-update tool that can model an organism's 3D appearance. (2020-11-08)

Perspectives of infrared spectroscopy in quantitative estimation of proteins
The present review describes the basic principle and the instrumentation of IR spectroscopy along with its advancements. Beyond this, various applications of this technique in determination of protein structure and quantification in different materials such as foods stuffs, biotechnological products and biological fluids have also been summarized. (2020-11-06)

How cell processes round up and dump damaged proteins
Reporting unexpected processes, chemist Eric Strieter at UMass Amherst says he and his group have discovered how an enzyme known as UCH37 regulates a cell's waste management system. (2020-11-06)

Virus that causes COVID-19 puts a plug in cellular defenses
One of the novel coronavirus' most insidious tricks is that it can block the ability of cells to produce protective proteins without hindering its own ability to replicate. A new Yale study reveals how it does it. (2020-11-05)

Sugar-coated viral proteins hijack and hitch a ride out of cells
Many viruses - including coronaviruses ¬- have protective outer layer made of proteins, fats and sugars. New research shows targeting sugar production has potential for broad-spectrum antiviral drugs (2020-11-05)

Researchers show how to target a shape-shifting protein in Alzheimer's disease
A new study suggests that it is possible to design drugs that can target a type of shape-shifting protein involved in Alzheimer's disease, which was previously thought to be undruggable. (2020-11-04)

New understanding of how proteins operate
A ground-breaking discovery by Centenary Institute scientists has provided new understanding as to the nature of proteins and how they exist and operate in the human body. (2020-11-04)

Plant viruses hijack the defence system of plants, but there might be a way to strike back
Recently discovered interactions between plant and viral proteins open up new avenues for making plants resistant to viruses, thus safeguarding crop yields in changing climate conditions. (2020-11-03)

For plant and animal immune systems the similarities go beyond sensing
Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) and University of Cologne researcher Takaki Maekawa and colleagues have discovered that plants have independently evolved a family of immune proteins that are strikingly similar to animals. (2020-11-02)

New analysis method can lead to better cancer drugs
While proteins on the surface of cells are the targets for most drugs, refined methods are needed to analyse how these membrane proteins are organised. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new DNA-based analytical method that could contribute to the development of future drugs for breast and other cancers. The study is published in Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-11-02)

In your gut: How bacteria survive low oxygen environments
Researchers from ITQB NOVA, in collaboration with the Institut Pasteur in Paris, have shed light on the mechanisms that allow Clostridioides difficile, a pathogen that can only grow in oxygen-free environments, to survive low oxygen levels. C. difficile is a major cause of intestinal problems associated with the use of antibiotics, causing an estimated number of 124k cases per year in the EU, costing on average 5k€ per patient, as a direct consequence of healthcare-associated contagion. (2020-11-02)

Researchers discover mechanism that allows SINEUPs to amplify protein production
Scientists from an international group led by the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences and Yokohama City University have discovered that a pair of proteins play a key role in allowing an important type of functional non-coding RNA, known as SINEUPs, to act to promote their target messenger RNA. (2020-11-01)

The protein dress of a neuron
New method marks proteins and reveals the receptors in which neurons are dressed (2020-11-01)

Computer vision helps find binding sites in drug targets
Scientists from the iMolecule group at Skoltech developed BiteNet, a machine learning (ML) algorithm that helps find drug binding sites, i.e. potential drug targets, in proteins. BiteNet can analyze 1,000 protein structures in 1.5 minutes and find optimal spots for drug molecules to attach. (2020-10-27)

Langerhans cells are up to the job, they just need a chance
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that Langerhans cells (LCs) play a crucial role in mucocutaneous acute guest-versus-host disease (aGVHD). Their experiments in mice showed that when the LCs of a recipient were depleted, the formation of mucocutaneous lesions was enhanced because the infiltration of CD8+ T cells was inhibited. Their findings have significant implications for improving blood stem cell transplantation treatments and clinical outcomes for patients. (2020-10-27)

Coronaviruses are masters of mimicry, new study finds
Coronaviruses are adept at imitating human immune proteins that have been implicated in severe COVID-19 disease, a study from researchers at Columbia University has found. (2020-10-27)

Phytoplasma effector proteins devastate host plants through molecular mimicry
'Our group has been studying the proteins that are targeted by the phytoplasma effector proteins for almost 30 years,' said Günter Theißen, one of the scientists involved in the study. 'In our latest research, based on just few data and some simple assumptions, we predicted the structure of the respective effector protein (termed SAP54) about 5 years ago. With the new work, we tested our hypothesis experimentally, and found that our prediction was quite accurate.' (2020-10-26)

Researchers solve 'protein paradox' and suggest way to exploit cancer weakness
Researchers from UCPH have discovered how thus far a mysterious function of the so-called MCM proteins protect the human cells against DNA instability, which can cause devastating diseases including cancer. In addition to their known role as molecular motors of genome duplication, MCM proteins control the speed of this process. How cells manage to constrain the speed of DNA replication has puzzled researchers for decades and has even been called a ''MCM paradox''. (2020-10-22)

Brigham researchers make strides in detecting preeclampsia risk
To improve early detection of preeclampsia risks and better classify potential subtypes of the disease, a team led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital analyzed an array of maternal and placental proteins, identifying several biomarkers that, from a blood sample drawn at 12 weeks gestation, can help predict the risk of preeclampsia and, equally importantly, can assess who may develop more severe forms of the condition. (2020-10-21)

Scientists map the human proteome
Twenty years after the release of the human genome, the genetic 'blueprint' of human life, an international research team, including the University of British Columbia's Chris Overall, has now mapped the first draft sequence of the human proteome. (2020-10-19)

Old methods prove true for studying proteins
A decades-old technique for probing protein motions proves more accurate than current practices. (2020-10-17)

Mapping how three lethal coronaviruses engage their hosts reveals potential drug targets
Seeking to inform development of drugs effective against multiple pathogenic human coronaviruses, David E. Gordon and colleagues compared host interactions of MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2, uncovering host pathways commonly hijacked by all three. (2020-10-15)

Research demonstrates a molecular dance that keeps your heart beating
New research demonstrates a molecular dance that keeps your heart beating. The findings could someday lead to improved diagnostics and medical treatments for serious and sometimes devastating hereditary heart conditions. (2020-10-14)

A new protein discovered that repairs DNA
Our cells have DNA repair systems to defend themselves against this sort of damage. One of these systems is based on a protein, photolysis, which uses blue light to repair DNA damage before it leads to mutations. (2020-10-14)

Research team discovers mechanism that restores cell function after genome damage
Researchers at the University of Cologne have found out how cells can recover their development and longevity after damage by UV / discovery may enable therapy against premature aging (2020-10-13)

Antibodies from patients infected with SARS-CoV in 2003 cross-neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in vitro
Antibodies in serum samples collected from patients infected with SARS-CoV during the 2003 outbreak effectively neutralized SARS-CoV-2 infection in cultured cells, according to a new study. The authors also report that, surprisingly, mice and rabbits immunized with a receptor. (2020-10-09)

Setting a TRAP for pandemic-causing viruses
A new laboratory technique quickly sifts through trillions of synthetic proteins to find ones that can target viruses, helping healthcare authorities rapidly respond to evolving pandemics. (2020-10-08)

New perspectives to treat neuropschychiatric diseases
Researchers studied the major types of neurons of the prefrontal cortex of the brain in an international collaboration. The research team has identified molecular differences in neurons that may support drug development for the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or depression. (2020-10-08)

Breaking the coupling process
Real-time observation of signal transmission in proteins provides new insights for drug research. (2020-10-06)

New techniques probe vital and elusive proteins
Researchers at the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery and ASU's School of Molecular Sciences, along with their colleagues, investigate a critically important class of proteins, which adorn the outer membranes of cells. Such membrane proteins often act as receptors for binding molecules, initiating signals that can alter cell behavior in a variety of ways. (2020-10-06)

Why do people respond differently to the same drug?
Scientists at Scripps Research have comprehensively mapped how a key class of proteins within cells regulates signals coming in from cell surface receptors. The study reveals that people commonly have variants in these proteins that cause their cells to respond differently when the same cell receptor is stimulated--offering a plausible explanation for why people's responses to the same drugs can vary widely. (2020-10-01)

A cancer shredder
Researchers at the universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt (Germany) have developed a new compound for treating cancer. It destroys a protein that triggers its development. (2020-09-29)

RAP tag: A new protein purification approach
A research team from the University of Tsukuba described a new approach for protein labelling and purification using plant cells. Using the RAP tag and PMab-2 antibody, this affinity purification approach showed high affinity and specificity. Moreover, they showed that plant-produced monoclonal antibodies maintain their characteristics and their production can optimized to reduce the cost of antibody-based approaches. (2020-09-25)

Bird genes are multitaskers, say scientists
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have found that although male and female birds have an almost identical set of genes, they function differently in each sex through a mechanism called alternative splicing. (2020-09-25)

Genetic variation unlikely to influence COVID-19 morbidity and mortality
A comprehensive search of genetic variation databases has revealed no significant differences across populations and ethnic groups in seven genes associated with viral entry of SARS-CoV-2. (2020-09-24)

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