Nav: Home

Current Proteins News and Events

Current Proteins News and Events, Proteins News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Biochemistry: Versatile recycling in the cell
Ribosomes need regenerating. This process is important for the quality of the proteins produced and thus for the whole cell homeostasis as well as for developmental and biological processes. (2019-07-18)
Deciphering brain somatic mutations associated with Alzheimer's disease
KAIST researchers have identified somatic mutations in the brain that could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). (2019-07-18)
New study on the immune system of plants: It works differently than expected
What happens at the molecular level when plants defend against invading pathogens? (2019-07-15)
High-risk pregnancy: The interferon effect
Teams from the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS, Inserm, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital (AP-HP) and Université de Paris have identified a new cellular mechanism that alters placental development, potentially causing serious complications during pregnancy. (2019-07-11)
Understanding how the mTOR complex comes together
Learning more about the mTOR complex and how it works is a stepping stone for others who might look for cancer therapies or ways to help treat diabetes and other diseases. (2019-07-10)
Transformed tobacco fields could cuts costs for medical proteins
A new Cornell University-led study describes the first successful rearing of engineered tobacco plants in order to produce medical and industrial proteins outdoors in the field, a necessity for economic viability, so they can be grown at large scales. (2019-07-08)
Protein-linked sugars are crucial for the uptake of proteins linked to Parkinson's disease
New research from the University of Pennsylvania shows how glycoproteins, proteins with added sugar molecules, influence the uptake of protein aggregates that are associated with Parkinson's disease. (2019-07-03)
New chemical tools to modify and study biomolecules
EPFL chemists have developed new tools to modify sulfur-containing biomolecules, from simple amino acids to large protein complexes such as nucleosomes. (2019-07-02)
Proteins trapped in glass could yield new medicinal advances
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a unique method for studying proteins which could open new doors for medicinal research. (2019-07-02)
Coupled proteins
Researchers from Heidelberg University and Sendai University in Japan used new biotechnological methods to study how human cells react to and further process external signals. (2019-07-01)
New insights into membrane trafficking regulated by ER fusion protein
Prof. HU Junjie from the Institute of Biophysics and his collaborators reported that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusogen atlastin (ATL) was involved in regulating cargo mobility and COPII formation in the ER. (2019-06-27)
Protein scissors for cellular transport
The movement of material in and out a cell, endocytosis, depends on proteins that cut the membrane to form vesicles encapsulating the transported materials. (2019-06-26)
Immunotherapy and HDAC inhibition are anti-cancer besties
Colorado study shows that adding HDAC inhibitor sensitized cancers to anti-PD1 therapy. (2019-06-24)
Gold adds the shine of reversible assembly to protein cages
An international team including researchers from the University of Tsukuba has shown the reversible self-assembly of protein cages using gold ions to direct the process. (2019-06-18)
How the cell protects itself
The cell contains transcripts of the genetic material, which migrate from the cell nucleus to another part of the cell. (2019-06-12)
Nuclear pore complex outer rings: No longer 'one size fits all'
In eukaryotic cells, molecules can only move into or out of the nucleus through specialized channels called nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). (2019-06-12)
A microscopic topographic map of cellular function
The flow of traffic through our nation's highways and byways is meticulously mapped and studied, but less is known about how materials in cells travel. (2019-06-12)
Fishing a line coupled with clockwork for daily rhythm
Cells harbor molecular clocks that generate a circadian oscillation of about 24 h. (2019-06-06)
Video gamers design brand new proteins
By encoding their specialized knowledge into the computer game Foldit, university researchers enabled citizen scientists to successfully design synthetic proteins for the first time. (2019-06-05)
New genes out of nothing
One key question in evolutionary biology is how novel genes arise and develop. (2019-06-04)
Researchers can now predict properties of disordered polymers
Thanks to a team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Massachusetts Amherst, scientists are able to read patterns on long chains of molecules to understand and predict behavior of disordered strands of proteins and polymers. (2019-06-03)
NUS researchers uncovers promising cancer target for liposarcoma
A study conducted by a team of researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore has revealed a close association between liposarcoma (LPS), a type of cancer that develops from fat cells, and the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein family. (2019-06-03)
In-situ measurement of 3D protein structure inside living eukaryotic cells
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have successfully determined the high-resolution three-dimensional structure of proteins inside living eukaryotic cells. (2019-06-01)
Scientists engineer unique 'glowing' protein
Biophysicists from MIPT and their colleagues from France and Germany have created a new fluorescent protein. (2019-05-30)
Artificial intelligence boosts proteome research
Using artificial intelligence, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in making the mass analysis of proteins from any organism significantly faster than before and almost error-free. (2019-05-29)
Study reveals structure of a 'master switch' controlling cell division
Unregulated cell division is a hallmark of cancer, and one of the key proteins involved in controlling cell division is called FoxM1. (2019-05-28)
Coat of proteins makes viruses more infectious and links them to Alzheimer's disease
New research from Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet shows that viruses interact with proteins in the biological fluids of their host which results in a layer of proteins on the viral surface. (2019-05-27)
Dissolving protein traffic jam at the entrance of mitochondria
Researchers from Freiburg discovered a novel mechanism that ensures obstacle-free protein traffic into the powerhouse of the cell. (2019-05-23)
Ancient proteins offer clues to the past
Archeologists once relied solely on artifacts, such as skeletal remains, fossils and pottery sherds, to learn about past species and cultures. (2019-05-22)
Scientists use molecular tethers, chemical 'light sabers' for tissue engineering
Researchers at the University of Washington unveiled a new strategy to keep proteins intact and functional in synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering. (2019-05-21)
Protein that hinders advancement of prostate cancer identified
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that blocking a specific protein, may be a promising strategy to prevent the spread of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). (2019-05-20)
Designing biological movement on the nanometer scale
Synthetic proteins have now been created that can move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways. (2019-05-16)
Understanding the power of honey through its proteins
Honey is a culinary staple that can be found in kitchens around the world. (2019-05-08)
Creating a global map of the protein shape universe
Purdue University researchers have come up with a novel way to classify proteins and their shapes, which lays the foundation of how we understand protein structures and functions. (2019-05-08)
Research brief: Surface protein editing in bacteria
UMN research delves into an unknown cell circuit in bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics. (2019-05-07)
Tiny droplets open the doors to in-flight imaging of proteins
For the first time, researchers have demonstrated the creation of a beam of nanodroplets capable of delivering a variety of biological samples, from cell organelles to single proteins, virtually free from any contaminations, to the focus of an X-ray laser which can be used to image them. (2019-05-03)
New giant virus may help scientists better understand the emergence of complex life
A team of scientists led by virologist Masaharu Takemura at Tokyo University of Science and Hiroyuki Ogata at Kyoto University in Japan have discovered a giant virus that, much like the mythical monster Medusa, can turn almost amoeba to a stone-like cyst. (2019-04-30)
Amid genomic data explosion, scientists find proliferating errors
Washington State University researchers found a troubling number of errors in publicly available genomic data as they conducted a large-scale analysis of protein sequences. (2019-04-30)
Disease-causing nibbling amoeba hides by displaying proteins from host cells
A parasitic amoeba that causes severe gut disease in humans protects itself from attack by biting off pieces of host cells and putting their proteins on its own surface, according to a study by microbiologists at UC Davis. (2019-04-30)
Can we cure cancer by finding out how two proteins interact?
The research conducted by Dr. Sila Özdemir during her Ph.D. (2019-04-30)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".