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Current Proteins News and Events

Current Proteins News and Events, Proteins News Articles.
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Cell-killing proteins suppress listeria without killing cells
New North Carolina State University research shows that key proteins known for their ability to prevent viral infections by inducing cell death can also block certain bacterial infections without triggering the death of the host cells. (2019-04-18)
Scientists get sly, use deception to fight cancer
In recent years, it's become clear that RNA-binding proteins play a major role in cancer growth. (2019-04-15)
Army scientists lead the way to produce tools for engineering biomolecules
Army scientists have discovered how to build novel synthetic biomolecule complexes that they believe are a critical step towards biotemplated advanced materials. (2019-04-15)
Novel approach promises ready access to hard-to-study proteins
A novel strategy capable of extracting and driving hard-to-reach proteins into water solution where they can be effectively studied using mass spectrometry, a powerful analytical technique, promises a trove of biological insights and, importantly, may help identify therapeutically relevant proteins and provide new disease diagnostic techniques. (2019-04-15)
We now know how insects and bacteria control ice
in a paper published today in the Journal of the American Chemical Society University of Utah professor Valeria Molinero and her colleagues show how key proteins produced in bacteria and insects can either promote or inhibit the formation of ice, based on their length and their ability to team up to form large ice-binding surfaces. (2019-04-12)
Broken mitochondria use 'eat me' proteins to summon their executioners
When mitochondria become damaged, they avoid causing further problems by signaling cellular proteins to degrade them. (2019-04-11)
New electron microscopy technique limits membrane destruction
Researchers at Purdue University have created an electron microscopy technique termed 'cryoAPEX' that accurately tracks membrane proteins in a well-preserved cell. (2019-04-10)
Cell death may be triggered by 'hit-and-run' interaction
A 'hit-and-run' interaction between two proteins could be an important trigger for cell death, according to new research from Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers. (2019-04-09)
Breakthrough in knowledge of how some sarcomas arise
The origin of certain cancers in the sarcoma group is associated with a hitherto unknown interaction among different proteins. (2019-04-08)
How good are protein disorder prediction programs actually?
Until now it was difficult to answer this question, as a good benchmark for testing these bioinformatics programs was lacking. (2019-04-05)
Cell lesson: better coordinated than isolated
A new study led by Juana Díez, principal investigator of the Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS) at UPF, has found a new system in our cells that makes them more robust against possible alterations in the expression of our genes. (2019-04-04)
About TFE: Old and new findings
The fluorinated alcohol 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol (TFE) has been implemented for many decades now in conformational studies of proteins and peptides. (2019-04-04)
Tipping the scales
Human cells have a sophisticated regulatory system at their disposal: labeling proteins with the small molecule ubiquitin. (2019-04-03)
Insects in freezing regions have a protein that acts like antifreeze
The power to align water molecules is usually held by ice, which affects nearby water and encourages it to join the ice layer. (2019-04-02)
Programmable 'Legos' of DNA and protein building blocks create novel 3D cages
The central goal of nanotechnology is the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices or structures. (2019-04-02)
The inflammation connection
New biological findings point towards a new avenue for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. (2019-04-01)
A cellular protein as a 'gas pump attendant' of cancer development
Scientists at the University of Würzburg have discovered a new mechanism of gene transcription in tumor cells. (2019-04-01)
Traffic jam in the cell: How are proteins assigned to specific transporters?
Special carriers ensure that proteins are transported to where they are needed in the cell. (2019-04-01)
New mathematical model could be key to designing effective therapies for brain disorders
A collaboration between researchers from the UAB Institute of Neurosciences (INc) and the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline, published in March in Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, describes a mathematical model to quantify the activity of biased G-protein-coupled receptors. (2019-03-28)
Human protein produced in CHO-cells can save donor blood
Researchers from DTU Biosustain have successfully produced mammalian cell lines (CHO) that can produce 1.2 g/L recombinant Alpha-1-antitrypsin proteins with human glycosylation profiles. (2019-03-27)
How nerve cells control misfolded proteins
Researchers have identified a protein complex that marks misfolded proteins, stops them from interacting with other proteins in the cell and directs them towards disposal. (2019-03-27)
New gene potentially involved in metastasis identified
Cancers that display a specific combination of sugars, called T-antigen, are more likely to spread through the body and kill a patient. (2019-03-26)
UIC researchers find hidden proteins in bacteria
Scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago have developed a way to identify the beginning of every gene -- known as a translation start site or a start codon -- in bacterial cell DNA with a single experiment and, through this method, they have shown that an individual gene is capable of coding for more than one protein. (2019-03-20)
Study finds test of protein levels in the eye a potential predictor of (future) Alzheimer's disease
Low levels of amyloid-β and tau proteins, biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in eye fluid were significantly associated with low cognitive scores, according to a new study. (2019-03-18)
How to catch ovarian cancer earlier
Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed too late for effective treatment. (2019-03-15)
Can an antifreeze protein also promote ice formation?
Antifreeze is life's means of surviving in cold winters: Natural antifreeze proteins help fish, insects, plants and even bacteria live through low temperatures that should turn their liquid parts to deadly shards of ice. (2019-03-14)
FSU researchers discover a novel protein degradation pathway
A Florida State University research team how a type of protein that is embedded in the inner nuclear membrane clears out of the system once it has served its purpose. (2019-03-12)
Inhibiting post-translational modifications may lower oxidative stress in the aging eye
Advanced age is the largest risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). (2019-03-11)
UNH researchers identify role gender-biased protein may play in autism
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are one step closer to helping answer the question of why autism is four times more common in boys than in girls after identifying and characterizing the connection of certain proteins in the brain to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). (2019-03-11)
Protection from Zika virus may lie in a protein derived from mosquitoes
By targeting a protein found in the saliva of mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, Yale investigators reduced Zika infection in mice. (2019-03-11)
Genes that evolve from scratch expand protein diversity
A new study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution led by scientists from the University of Chicago challenges one of the classic assumptions about how new proteins evolve. (2019-03-11)
How antifreeze proteins make ice crystals grow
Bacteria, plants, insects, or even fish use antifreeze proteins to protect themselves from the cold. (2019-03-07)
Researchers systematically track protein interactions in defense against viruses
The body's defense strategies against viral infections are as diverse as the attacks themselves. (2019-03-04)
Gotcha! Scientists fingerprint proteins using their vibrations
In the cells of every living organism -- humans, birds, bees, roses and even bacteria -- proteins vibrate with microscopic motions that help them perform vital tasks ranging from cell repair to photosynthesis. (2019-03-04)
New research area: How protein structures change due to normal forces
Proteins made in our cells are folded into specific shapes so they can fulfill their functions. (2019-03-01)
A highly sensitive new blood test can detect rare cancer proteins
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University developed a new blood test that can identify proteins-of-interest down to the sub-femtomolar range with minimal errors. (2019-03-01)
Thermodynamic properties of hevein investigated by Lobachevsky University scientists
Hevein is a small protein consisting of forty-three amino acid residues. (2019-02-28)
Custom-made proteins may help create antibodies to fight HIV
Using computational modeling, a team of researchers led by Penn State designed and created proteins that mimicked different surface features of HIV. (2019-02-27)
New clue for cancer treatment could be hiding in microscopic molecular machine
Researchers have discovered a critical missing step in the production of proteasomes -- tiny structures in a cell that dispose of protein waste -- and found that carefully targeted manipulation of this step could prove an effective recourse for the treatment of cancer. (2019-02-26)
Revealing the role of the mysterious small proteins
CRG investigators develop a technique to identify and classify proteins with less than 100 amino acids. (2019-02-22)
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