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Current Proteins News and Events

Current Proteins News and Events, Proteins News Articles.
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Mutation reduces energy waste in plants
In a way, plants are energy wasters: in order to protect themselves from excessive electron transport, they continuously quench light energy and don't use it for photosynthesis and biomass production. (2020-04-08)
World's largest map of protein connections holds clues to health and disease
A large international team has produced the largest map of interactions between gene-encoded protein molecules. (2020-04-08)
New method to monitor Alzheimer's proteins
IBS-CINAP research team has reported a new method to identify the aggregation state of amyloid beta (Aβ) proteins in solution. (2020-04-07)
Evaluating embryo quality with ultrasensitive protein detection
Infertility is estimated to affect 9% of reproductive-aged couples globally, and many couples turn to assisted reproductive technology. (2020-04-07)
Autophagy: Scientists discover novel role for self-recycling process in the brain
Proteins classically associated with autophagy regulate the speed of intracellular transport. (2020-03-31)
Cellular train track deformities shed light on neurological disease
A new technique allows researchers to test how the deformation of tiny train track-like cell proteins affects their function. (2020-03-27)
Found in mistranslation
In a new study, scientists from Deepa Agashe's group at NCBS find that irrespective of which proteins are impacted, there is indeed a benefit to non-specific mistranslation. (2020-03-25)
Changes in surface sugarlike molecules help cancer metastasize
Changes in a specific type of sugarlike molecule, or glycan, on the surface of cancer cells help them to spread into other tissues, according to researchers at UC Davis. (2020-03-24)
'Thermometer' protein regulates blooming
As average temperatures rise every year, it is no longer rare to see plants flower as early as February. (2020-03-23)
Teamwork in a cell
For the first time ever, researchers are looking at the molecular processes in the cell's skeleton -- the cytoskeleton -- from a bird's eye perspective. (2020-03-23)
Blocking sugar structures on viruses and tumor cells
During a viral infection, viruses enter the body and multiply in its cells. (2020-03-17)
Composing new proteins with artificial intelligence
Scientists have long studied how to improve proteins or design new ones. (2020-03-17)
Silkworms provide new spin on sticky molecules
E-selectin is grown in silkworms for the first time, revealing new aspects of its binding dynamics. (2020-03-16)
Inflammation in the brain linked to several forms of dementia
Inflammation in the brain may be more widely implicated in dementias than was previously thought, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. (2020-03-16)
Flexible 'heroes' save delicate proteins from stress
Protein aggregation and misfolding underpins several neurodegenerative diseases; proteins can also become aggregated or denatured under conditions of stress. (2020-03-13)
Bristol pioneers use of VR for designing new drugs
Researchers at the University of Bristol are pioneering the use of virtual reality (VR) as a tool to design the next generation of drug treatments. (2020-03-11)
Cancer cells spread using a copper-binding protein
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have shown that the Atox1 protein, found in breast cancer cells, participates in the process by which cancer cells metastasise. (2020-03-10)
New study unveils the mechanism of DNA high-order structure formation
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled the structure and mechanism of proteins that are highly overexpressed in various cancers and associated with poor patient prognoses. (2020-03-09)
Resurrecting ancient protein partners reveals origin of protein regulation
After reconstructing the ancient forms of two cellular proteins, scientists discovered the earliest known instance of a complex form of protein regulation. (2020-03-06)
Porin-like proteins sneak nutrients through Mycobacterium tuberculosis' waxy defensive walls
Explaining how slow-growing tuberculosis bacteria acquire nutrients across their membranes, without also becoming vulnerable to drugs that target them, researchers report a crucial role in this for a family of porin-like proteins in the bacteria's notoriously tough, waxy coating. (2020-03-05)
Scientists find functioning amyloid in healthy brain
The generation of amyloids, a special form of fibrillar proteins, is believed to result in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. (2020-03-02)
Study finds 'silent' genetic variations can alter protein folding
New research from the University of Notre Dame shows these silent mutations are worth a closer look. (2020-03-02)
Genetic signature boosts protein production during cell division
A research team has uncovered a genetic signature that enables cells to adapt their protein production according to their state. (2020-02-28)
New technique could streamline drug design
Technique uses 3D structural models to predict how combinations of molecular blocks might work together. (2020-02-27)
Newly identified cellular trash removal program helps create new neurons
New research by University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists reveals how a cellular filament helps neural stem cells clear damaged and clumped proteins, an important step in eventually producing new neurons. (2020-02-27)
Clemson researchers ID protein function in parasites that cause sometimes fatal diseases
In the quest to develop more effective treatments for parasitic diseases, scientists look for weaknesses in the organisms' molecular machinery. (2020-02-24)
The strategy of cells to deal with the accumulation of misfolded proteins is identified
In the paper, published in the journal Cell Reports, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe yeast model has been used to investigate the protein quality control process. (2020-02-21)
Exploring a genome's 3D organization through a social network lens
Computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have taken an algorithm used to study social networks, such as Facebook communities, and adapted it to identify how DNA and proteins are interconnected into communities within the cell nucleus. (2020-02-20)
Study points to better medical diagnosis through levitating human blood
New research from the UBC's Okanagan campus, Harvard Medical School and Michigan State University suggests that levitating human plasma may lead to faster, more reliable, portable and simpler disease detection. (2020-02-19)
Researchers discover how cells clear misfolded proteins from tissues
Researchers in Japan have identified a new quality control system that allows cells to remove damaged and potentially toxic proteins from their surroundings. (2020-02-18)
Scientists discover that human cell function removes extracellular amyloid protein
The accumulation of aberrant proteins in the body will cause various neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-02-18)
Reproductive genome from the laboratory
Max Planck researchers have for the first time developed a genome the size of a minimal cell that can copy itself. (2020-02-18)
Controlling the messenger with blue light
IBS scientists have developed a new optogenetic tool to visualize and control the position of specific messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules inside living cells. (2020-02-17)
Technique can label many specific DNAs, RNAs, or proteins in a single tissue sample
A new technique can label diverse molecules and amplify the signal to help researchers spot those that are especially rare. (2020-02-15)
New technique tracks individual protein movement on live cells
The piece of gold that Richard Taylor was thrilled to track down weighed less than a single bacterium. (2020-02-15)
Autophagy degrades liquid droplets, but not aggregates, of proteins
Autophagy is a mechanism through which cellular protein is degraded. (2020-02-13)
Mechanism of controlling autophagy by liquid-liquid phase separation revealed
Japanese scientists elucidated characteristics of PAS through observing the Atg protein using a fluorescence microscope and successfully reconstituted PAS in vitro. (2020-02-13)
Mass General Hospital researchers identify new 'universal' target for antiviral treatment
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel potential antiviral drug target that could lead to treatments protecting against a host of infectious diseases. (2020-02-11)
Tumor vs. immune system: A battle to decide the host's fate
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that soluble CD155 suppresses NK cells of the innate immune system to promote tumor growth by interfering with DNAM-1. (2020-02-10)
New repair mechanism for DNA breaks
Researchers from the University of Seville and the Andalusian Centre of Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (CABIMER) have identified new factors that are necessary for the repair of these breaks. (2020-02-10)
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