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Current Psychologists News and Events, Psychologists News Articles.
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Developmental psychology -- One good turn deserves another
Five-year-olds enforce reciprocal behavior in social interactions. A study by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich psychologists shows that children come to recognize reciprocity as a norm between the ages of 3 and 5. (2019-09-18)
Why should you care about AI used for hiring?
The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology has published a new white paper that explores the hype and mystique surrounding artificial intelligence in hiring. (2019-09-06)
Fix and prevent health disparities in children by supporting mom, and dad
According to the recent National Academies report on health disparities in children, one of the most important factors in preventing and addressing disparities is the well-being of the child's primary caregiver. (2019-09-05)
Treatment for sexual and domestic violence offenders does work
A first-of-its-kind meta-study has found that specialised psychological programmes for sexual and domestic violence offenders have led to major reductions in reoffending but best results are achieved with consistent input from a qualified psychologist. (2019-08-20)
Facts and stories: Great stories undermine strong facts
If someone is trying to persuade or influence others, should they use a story or stick to the facts? (2019-08-19)
Care less with helmet
A bike helmet suggests safety -- even if the wearer is not sitting on a bike and the helmet cannot fulfil its function. (2019-08-15)
Males of a feather flock together
'Birds of a feather flock together' or rather 'opposites attract'? (2019-08-14)
Psychology can help prevent deadly childhood accidents
Injuries have overtaken infectious disease as the leading cause of death for children worldwide, and psychologists have the research needed to help predict and prevent deadly childhood mishaps, according to a presentation at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. (2019-08-10)
Why stress and anxiety aren't always bad
People generally think of stress and anxiety as negative concepts, but while both stress and anxiety can reach unhealthy levels, psychologists have long known that both are unavoidable -- and that they often play a helpful, not harmful, role in our daily lives, according to a presentation at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. (2019-08-10)
Puppy love: Choosing the perfect pooch poses challenges similar to dating
Indiana University psychologists who study relationship choice have found that when it comes to picking a canine companion, what people say they want in a dog isn't always in line with what they choose. (2019-06-25)
Emotions from touch
Touching different types of surfaces may incur certain emotions. This was the conclusion made by the psychologists from the Higher School of Economics in a recent empirical study. (2019-06-03)
Church, couch, couple: Social psychological connections between people and physical space
From couples to communities, the built environment shapes us as much as we shape it. (2019-05-30)
Passion trumps love for sex in relationships
When women distinguish between sex and the relational and emotional aspects of a relationship, this determines how often couples in long-term relationships have sex. (2019-05-16)
How grunting influences perception in tennis
Grunting noises in tennis influence the prediction of ball flight. (2019-05-03)
Immigrants: citizens' acceptance depends on questions asked
How many immigrants per year should Switzerland be prepared to welcome? (2019-05-02)
Celebrity fat shaming has ripple effects on women's implicit anti-fat attitudes
Comparing 20 instances of celebrity fat-shaming with women's implicit attitudes about weight before and after the event, psychologists from McGill University found that instances of celebrity fat-shaming were associated with an increase in women's implicit negative weight-related attitudes. (2019-04-15)
Psychologists find smiling really can make people happier
Smiling really can make people feel happier, according to a new paper published in Psychological Bulletin. (2019-04-11)
Integrating infant mental health into the neonatal intensive care unit
Psychotherapists attend to mental health needs of NICU families, specifically focusing on the developing relationship between babies and parents. (2019-04-03)
Depression in 20s linked to memory loss in 50s, find Sussex psychologists
Depression in twenties linked to memory loss in fifties, find Sussex psychologists. (2019-03-20)
The nearer the friends, the stronger the regional identity
Satisfaction of young people increases when they can identify with the region in which they live. (2019-03-12)
How listening to music 'significantly impairs' creativity
The popular view that music enhances creativity has been challenged by researchers who say it has the opposite effect. (2019-02-27)
Food allergies: A research update
Families impacted by food allergies will need psychosocial support as they try promising new therapies that enable them to ingest a food allergen daily or wear a patch that administers a controlled dose of that food allergen. (2019-02-22)
Live better with attainable goals
Those who set realistic goals can hope for a higher level of well-being. (2019-02-15)
Even psychological placebos have an effect
Placebo effects do not only occur in medical treatment -- placebos can also work when psychological effects are attributed to them. (2019-02-05)
UBC Researcher adopts play-by-play method to understand how counsellors can promote health
Using a page from a coach's playbook, a UBC researcher has come up with a method to analyze behaviour change counselling sessions and determine what makes them work. (2019-01-28)
The feminization of men leads to a rise in homophobia
Before the feminist revolution, men built their masculinity on traits that opposed those assigned to women. (2019-01-22)
Stressed? Having a partner present -- even in your mind -- may keep blood pressure down
Visualizing your significant other may be just as effective as having them in the room with you when it comes to managing the body's cardiovascular response to stressful situations, according to a University of Arizona study. (2019-01-22)
Adults with autism can read complex emotions in others
New research shows for the first time that adults with autism can recognise complex emotions such as regret and relief in others as easily as those without the condition. (2019-01-07)
Can artificial intelligence tell a polar bear from a can opener?
How smart is the form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning computer networks, and how closely do these machines mimic the human brain? (2019-01-07)
Internet therapy apps reduce depression symptoms, IU study finds
In a sweeping new study, Indiana University psychologists have found that a series of self-guided, internet-based therapy platforms effectively reduce depression. (2018-12-11)
Explaining happiness
It is widely believed that each person finds the source of happiness within themselves and nowhere else. (2018-11-08)
More than intelligence needed for success in life
Research carried out at the University of Adelaide and the University of Bristol has examined long-held beliefs that success in school and careers is due to more than just high intelligence. (2018-11-05)
UC psychologists devise free test for measuring intelligence
Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices is a widely used standardized test to measure reasoning ability. (2018-10-29)
Stanford researchers learn how the brain decides what to learn
Neuroscientists know a lot about how our brains learn new things, but not much about how they choose what to focus on while they learn. (2018-10-25)
Does putting the brakes on outrage bottle up social change?
While outrage is often generally considered a hurdle in the path to civil discourse, a team of psychologists suggest outrage -- specifically, moral outrage -- may have beneficial outcomes, such as inspiring people to take part in long-term collective action. (2018-10-23)
Do lovers always tease each other? Study shows how couples handle laughter and banter
How partners in a romantic relationship deal with laughter or being laughed at affects their every day life, their relationship satisfaction and even their sexuality. (2018-10-16)
Recognizing the uniqueness of different individuals with schizophrenia
Individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia differ greatly from one another. Researchers from Radboud university medical center, along with colleagues from England and Norway, have demonstrated that very few identical brain differences are shared amongst different patients. (2018-10-10)
Stepfathers' 'Cinderella effect' challenged by new study
Long-held assumptions that stepfathers are far more likely to be responsible for child deaths than genetic parents have been challenged by researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA). (2018-09-24)
The art of storytelling: researchers explore why we relate to characters
For thousands of years, humans have relied on storytelling to engage, to share emotions and to relate personal experiences. (2018-09-13)
Lying in a foreign language is easier
It is not easy to tell when someone is lying. (2018-07-19)
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