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Current Psychology News and Events, Psychology News Articles.
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Money can't buy love -- or friendship
While researchers have suggested that individuals who base their self-worth on their financial success often feel lonely in everyday life, a newly published study by the University at Buffalo and Harvard Business School has taken initial steps to better understand why this link exists. (2020-04-09)
False memories of crime appear real when retold to others
People are no better than chance at identifying when someone else is recounting a false or real memory of a crime, according to a new UCL study published in Frontiers in Psychology. (2020-04-08)
Anterior insula activation restores prosocial behavior in animal model of opioid addiction
Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology have shown that chemogenetic activation of the anterior insula restores prosocial behavior in an animal model of opioid addiction and empathy. (2020-04-03)
Most people consider becoming vegetarian for their health
Researchers know that people are motivated to be vegetarian for different reasons -- the most common in western cultures being health, the environment and animal rights. (2020-04-02)
Not finding new goals post-retirement associated with greater cognitive decline
Certain middle-aged and older adults, especially women who tend to disengage from difficult tasks and goals after they retire, may be at greater risk of cognitive decline as they age, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-03-16)
Kids who blame themselves for mom's sadness are more likely to face depression and anxiety
'Even if she doesn't say it, I know it's my fault that my mother gets sad.' Kids who believe comments like this -- assuming blame for their mom's sadness or depression -- are more likely to face depression and anxiety themselves, a new study led by SMU has found. (2020-03-11)
When older people feel excluded at work
Employees over 50 can feel excluded and demotivated in the workplace for various reasons. (2020-03-05)
Weight-based bullying linked to increased adolescent alcohol, marijuana us
Adolescents who are bullied about their weight or body shape may be more likely to use alcohol or marijuana than those who are not bullied, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-02-25)
Study highlights new strategies for helping children process negative emotions
A recent study of indigenous people in southern Chile challenges Western assumptions about children's emotional capabilities and highlights the value of spending time outdoors to help children regulate their emotions. (2020-02-20)
Big ideas in performance management 2.0
Industrial-era performance management paradigms and practices are outdated and ineffective in the modern VUCA work environment. (2020-02-19)
Smelling your lover's shirt could improve your sleep
The scent of a romantic partner can improve sleep, suggests new psychology research from the University of British Columbia. (2020-02-13)
Can beauty be-er ignored?
This Valentine's Day, psychologists from Edge Hill University explore the science behind the 'beer goggles' effect and suggests there is some truth to this when considering the attractiveness of potential suitors. (2020-02-13)
Pharmacological migraine prophylaxis shows almost no effect in children
Migraines affect not only adults but frequently also children and adolescents. (2020-02-10)
What makes a 'good Samaritan' good? That opinion depends on the beneficiary
New research suggests that someone who helps a total stranger is generally viewed as morally better and more trustworthy than someone who helps a family member. (2020-02-10)
Majority-minority social-group contact proves negative for the latter
The study, in which the University of Granada participated, was published recently by the journal Nature Human Behavior. (2020-02-06)
Focus on context diminishes memory of negative events, researchers report
In a new study, researchers report they can manipulate how the brain encodes and retains emotional memories. (2020-02-05)
Energy choices can be contagious -- but why?
A growing body of research shows that the behavior of peers can significantly influence an individual's energy-related decisions, but why that occurs is less clear. (2020-02-05)
Cuttlefish eat less for lunch when they know there'll be shrimp for dinner
Cuttlefish can rapidly learn from experience and adapt their eating behavior accordingly, a new study has shown. (2020-02-04)
For complex decisions, narrow them down to two
When choosing between multiple alternatives, people usually focus their attention on the two most promising options. (2020-02-03)
Those who believe that the economic system is fair are less troubled by poverty, homelessness, and extreme wealth
We react less negatively to extreme manifestations of economic disparity, such as homelessness, if we think the economic system is fair and legitimate, and these differences in reactivity are even detectable at the physiological level, finds a team of psychology researchers. (2020-01-30)
'Remainers' and 'Leavers' more united than divided, study finds
New research suggests those who voted to leave and those who voted to remain have much more in common than is typically assumed. (2020-01-30)
More autonomy at work reduces the risk of low back pain
A team of psychologists from Technische Universität Dresden, in cooperation with experts from health sciences and the Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, has carried out a meta-analysis to identify psychosocial work factors that pose a risk for the development of chronic low back pain (CLBP). (2020-01-23)
Art speaks for itself and makes hearts beat faster
Information about an artwork has no effect on the aesthetic experience of museum visitors. (2020-01-20)
Psychology program for refugee children improves wellbeing
A positive psychology program created by researchers at Queen Mary University of London focuses on promoting wellbeing in refugee children. (2020-01-17)
What happens to deferred intentions in the brain?
Placing a checkmark on the to-do list is an extremely liberating feeling for many eager list lovers, especially when the task has been postponed for a long time. (2020-01-10)
Most meat eaters support veganism as 'ethical' and good for the environment
A new survey of 1000 meat eaters finds support for the principles of veganism, but suggests most think it is inconvenient, expensive and a sacrifice in terms of taste. (2020-01-08)
Computerized training improves selective attention of soccer players
Researchers of the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Malaga (UMA) have demonstrated how computerized training -through a specific software- can improve the attentional capacity of athletes, particularly, soccer players. (2020-01-07)
Gender norms affect attitudes towards gay men and lesbian women globally
A study of attitudes towards sexual minorities in 23 countries show more negative views towards gay men than lesbian women, but culture creates some variation on who holds the negative attitudes. (2019-12-26)
The majority consider themselves more environmentally friendly than others
Research from the University of Gothenburg shows that we tend to overestimate our personal environmental engagement. (2019-12-19)
Emotion concepts are not the same worldwide
Fear, anger, sadness -- while it is often assumed these emotion concepts are the same the world over, new research suggests there is greater cross-cultural variation in 'how people think about emotions than is widely assumed', contributor Dr. (2019-12-19)
Knowledge-sharing: a how-to guide
How is knowledge exchanged and shared when interdisciplinary research teams work together? (2019-12-13)
How can you help your organization's expatriates succeed?
SIOP publishes white paper that explores how to promote your overseas workers' productivity and well-being. (2019-12-12)
Me, me, me! How narcissism changes throughout life
New research from Michigan State University conducted the longest study on narcissism to date, revealing how it changes over time. (2019-12-10)
By imaging the brain, scientists can predict a person's aptitude for training
People with specific brain attributes are more likely than others to benefit from targeted cognitive interventions designed to enhance fluid intelligence, scientists report in a new study. (2019-12-04)
Paying taxes less 'taxing' when we recognize how those dollars help others -- study
There's nothing certain in life except death and taxes. But taxpayers' support for the latter could potentially be improved, according to a new study led by SFU psychology researchers Emily Thornton and Lara Aknin. (2019-12-04)
Distress tolerance plays role in alcohol use and abuse among firefighters
A newly published report from a University of Houston psychology professor finds that firefighters who struggle with PTSD symptoms, and who think they cannot handle negative emotions, are likely to drink and use alcohol it to cope with negative emotions. (2019-12-03)
Earthquake risk perception: A picture is worth a thousand stats
Realistic images can be more effective than statistics for persuading people to support seismic upgrades to schools, UBC research suggests. (2019-12-02)
Caring for family is what motivates people worldwide
A study of more than 7,000 people from 27 countries, led by scientists in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology, has found that what motivates people the most is caring for their family. (2019-11-26)
Science underestimated dangerous effects of sleep deprivation
One of the largest sleep studies dubunks theory that suggests attention is the only cognitive function affected by sleep deprivation. (2019-11-21)
Personality traits affect retirement spending
How quickly you spend your savings in retirement may have as much or more to do with your personality than whether you have a lot of debt or want to leave an inheritance. (2019-11-18)
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