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Current Psychology News and Events, Psychology News Articles.
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Passion trumps love for sex in relationships
When women distinguish between sex and the relational and emotional aspects of a relationship, this determines how often couples in long-term relationships have sex. (2019-05-16)
Research links civic engagement to resilience
Flowers, home-cooked meals and time were among the items donated in the aftermath of the Christchurch terror attacks. (2019-05-15)
Women's leadership potential for top jobs overlooked in favor of men
The potential of women for leadership roles is being overlooked, while men benefit from the perception that they will grow into the role, new research from the University of Kent shows. (2019-05-14)
Anger more harmful to health of older adults than sadness
Anger may be more harmful to an older person's physical health than sadness, potentially increasing inflammation, which is associated with such chronic illnesses as heart disease, arthritis and cancer, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-05-09)
Only some people get one health benefit from social support
Scientists have long known that the support of friends and family plays a key role in protecting people's physical health. (2019-04-30)
Policies valuing cultural diversity improve minority students' sense of belonging
Psychology researchers exploring the belonging and achievement of middle school students found valuing cultural diversity reduces achievement gaps over the course of a year, while policies that favor colorblindness and assimilation led to wider achievement gaps. (2019-04-24)
Empathy often avoided because of mental effort
Even when feeling empathy for others isn't financially costly or emotionally draining, people will still avoid it because they think empathy requires too much mental effort, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-04-22)
Testosterone and cortisol modulate the effects of empathy on aggression in children
The study conducted in the UPV/EHU's Department of Basic Psychological Processes and their Development on 139 eight-year-old children has concluded that low levels of testosterone and high levels of empathy may explain the low levels of aggressive behaviour in girls; and that the low levels of empathy and high levels of cortisol may account for high levels of aggressive behaviour in boys. (2019-04-16)
Celebrity fat shaming has ripple effects on women's implicit anti-fat attitudes
Comparing 20 instances of celebrity fat-shaming with women's implicit attitudes about weight before and after the event, psychologists from McGill University found that instances of celebrity fat-shaming were associated with an increase in women's implicit negative weight-related attitudes. (2019-04-15)
Psychologists find smiling really can make people happier
Smiling really can make people feel happier, according to a new paper published in Psychological Bulletin. (2019-04-11)
Insecurities may drive people to save more
When people feel that their own good impressions of themselves are at risk, they may try to increase their savings, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-04-08)
Relationship benefits can be seen in your eyes
BYU psychology professor Wendy Birmingham's lab used an infrared camera that measured pupil width to track people's response to stressful events in real-time. (2019-04-08)
A simple strategy to improve your mood in 12 minutes
We all have a remedy -- a glass of wine or a piece of chocolate -- for lifting our spirits when we're in a bad mood. (2019-03-27)
Ethnic minorities not 'hypersensitive' to microaggressions, research shows
There is no evidence that ethnic minorities are more sensitive than other groups to supposedly trivial insults or invalidations, they just experience them more often, research from Goldsmiths, University of London shows. (2019-03-24)
Teens who seek solitude may know what's best for them, research suggests
Teens who choose to spend time alone may know what's best for them, according to new research that suggests solitude isn't a red flag for isolation or depression. (2019-03-22)
Avoidance or responsible moral choices -- what is your supervisor like?
It is important to understand and prevent unethical behavior in working life. (2019-03-21)
Psychology may help explain why male and female serial killers differ
Male and female serial killers tend to choose their victims and commit their crimes in different ways, which may be due to thousands of years of psychological evolution, according to researchers. (2019-03-20)
The power of gratitude in the workplace
The study shows that being thanked more often at work predicted better sleep, fewer headaches and healthier eating, because it improved nurses' work satisfaction. (2019-03-13)
Study: Messages of stewardship affect Christians' attitudes about climate change
Christians' attitudes toward the environment and climate change are shaped by whether they hold a view of humans as having stewardship of the Earth or dominion over the planet, and reading material from religious sources advocating a stewardship interpretation can increase their concern for environmental issues, a new study found. (2019-03-11)
Green spaces can help you trust strangers
Simple, inexpensive urban design interventions can increase well-being and social connections among city residents, finds a new case study from the Urban Realities Lab at the University of Waterloo. (2019-03-07)
How economic inequality shapes mobility expectations and behavior in disadvantaged youth
By integrating the methods and techniques of economics and psychology, an inventive framework reveals how rising economic inequality can weaken the motivating belief that achieving socioeconomic success is possible, which reduces the likelihood that young people from low socioeconomic status backgrounds will engage in behaviors that could improve their chances of upward mobility. (2019-02-26)
Be yourself at work -- It's healthier and more productive
At work, it's healthier and more productive just to be yourself, according to a new study from Rice University, Texas A&M University, the University of Memphis, Xavier University, Portland State University and the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-02-25)
Silver linings come from partner support, research says
Spouses can help breast cancer patients with coping by positively reframing the cancer experience and other negative experiences. (2019-02-20)
Catch me if you can: Study reveals disguises are surprisingly effective
In a new study, led by researchers at the universities of York and Huddersfield, disguises reduced the ability of participants to match faces by around 30 percent, even when they were warned that some of the people had changed the way they look. (2019-02-18)
Live better with attainable goals
Those who set realistic goals can hope for a higher level of well-being. (2019-02-15)
Brexit as much due to resistance to supranationalism as immigration
The UK referendum vote to leave the European Union (EU) may have had as much to do with people's distrust of international organisations as it did fear of immigration. (2019-02-12)
Why Mr. Nice could be Mr. Right
The key to relationship happiness could be as simple as finding a nice person. (2019-02-11)
Trump's simple, confident language has strong historical roots
To many, President Donald Trump's use of nontraditional, off-the-cuff language seems unlike that of any other politician, but new research on the language of past and present world leaders reveals simple, straightforward messaging that exudes confidence may be the new norm -- making Trump a man of his time, rhetorically speaking. (2019-02-11)
'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to girls
Asking young girls to 'do science' leads them to show greater persistence in science activities than does asking them to 'be scientists,' finds a new psychology study by researchers at New York University and Princeton University. (2019-02-06)
Even psychological placebos have an effect
Placebo effects do not only occur in medical treatment -- placebos can also work when psychological effects are attributed to them. (2019-02-05)
Your body image is impacted by those around you
Spending time with people who are not preoccupied with their bodies can improve your own eating habits and body image, according to researchers from the University of Waterloo. (2019-01-30)
Female graduates who wear 'sexy clothes' seen as less capable than counterparts
Females who dress 'sexily' at their graduation are perceived as being less competent and are believed to have performed worse in their degree than their peers who dress more professionally, new research from the University of Surrey reports. (2019-01-29)
Sleep, mood affect how 'in control' older adults feel
Psychology researchers have found another reason that sleep, mood and stress are important: they affect the extent to which older adults feel they have control over their lives. (2019-01-29)
'More unites us than divides us' say researchers
New research suggests that people are much more united in their beliefs and values than media reporting often suggests. (2019-01-29)
Collective nostalgia makes people prefer domestic products
Nostalgia for events experienced by members of your own group can make you prefer domestic products over foreign ones, concludes the first systematic investigation into the effects of collective nostalgia on consumer decisions. (2019-01-29)
In test of wisdom, new research favors Yoda over Spock
A person's ability to reason wisely about a challenging situation may improve when they also experience diverse yet balanced emotions, say researchers from the University of Waterloo. (2019-01-28)
Yale psychologists find that adults take girls' pain less seriously
Gender stereotypes can hurt children -- quite literally. When asked to assess how much pain a child is experiencing based on the observation of identical reactions to a finger-stick, American adults believe boys to be in more pain than girls, according to a new Yale study in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology. (2019-01-25)
'Happiness' exercises can boost mood in those recovering from substance use disorder
Brief, text-based, self-administered exercises can significantly increase in-the-moment happiness for adults recovering from substance use disorders, report researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Recovery Research Institute (2019-01-18)
'Statistics anxiety' is real, and new research suggests targeted ways to handle it
A new study uses an analytical technique called 'network science' to determine factors contributing to statistics anxiety among psychology majors. (2019-01-16)
Genetically modified food opponents know less than they think, research finds
People most opposed to genetically modified foods think they know the most about them, but actually know the least, new report finds. (2019-01-14)
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