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Current Psychology News and Events

Current Psychology News and Events, Psychology News Articles.
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Personality traits affect retirement spending
How quickly you spend your savings in retirement may have as much or more to do with your personality than whether you have a lot of debt or want to leave an inheritance. (2019-11-18)
Get your game face on: Study finds it may help
Could putting on a serious face in preparation for competition actually impact performance? (2019-11-14)
What your friends' brains look like when they think of you
If you ever wondered what's going on in your friends' brains when they think about you, new research may provide a clue. (2019-11-07)
The medieval Catholic church's influence on psychology of Western, industrialized societies
The Western Catholic church's influence on marriage and family structures during the Middle Ages shaped the cultural evolution of the beliefs and behaviors now common among Western Europeans and their cultural descendants, researchers report. (2019-11-07)
Autistic adults thought they were 'bad people'
Many over-50s who were diagnosed with autism late in life had grown up believing they were bad people, according to a new study published in the journal Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine. (2019-11-06)
Planning to avoid temptations helps in goal pursuit
Proactively planning to manage temptations may be more effective than simply responding to temptation when it arises, University of Wyoming researchers say. (2019-11-05)
When money is scarce, biased behavior happens faster
Discrimination may happen faster than the blink of an eye, especially during periods of economic scarcity, according to a new study from Cornell University. (2019-10-29)
Pyschologists analyze language to categorize human goals
The researchers say human goals can be broadly categorized in terms of four goals: 'prominence,' 'inclusiveness,' 'negativity prevention' and 'tradition.' (2019-10-29)
How 'knowing less' can boost language development in children
Children may learn new words better when they learn them in the context of other words they are just learning -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia. (2019-10-29)
Research worth 'bragging' about
A team of psychology researchers at the University of Missouri is providing one of the first comprehensive literature reviews on arrogance, as well as a way to classify the condition on different levels across a spectrum, similarly to how autism is diagnosed. (2019-10-22)
Rice study assesses college leadership training programs
A new study from psychologists at Rice University found they teach students about leadership, but additional measures are needed to evaluate how they impact students' real-life leadership skills. (2019-10-22)
Otago scientists' discovery leads to greater understanding of Alzheimer's disease
Otago scientists have made an important discovery in understanding the role a particular protein plays to impair memory in Alzheimer's disease, which could lead to more effective treatment in future. (2019-10-22)
Make some noise: How background noise affects brain activity
Have you ever found it difficult to focus on a task due to background noise? (2019-10-18)
New study debunks myth that only children are more narcissistic than kids with siblings
The stereotype that only children are selfish, or more self-centered than those with siblings is sometimes used as an argument for having more than one child, but researchers from Germany find there's no evidence for the claim that only children are more narcissistic than children with sibling. (2019-10-15)
Hope is a key factor in recovering from anxiety disorders
A University of Houston psychologist is reporting that hope increases in therapy and is a trait that predicts resilience and recovery from anxiety disorders, an important mechanism for therapists to restore in patients to move them forward toward recovery. (2019-10-14)
Sweating for science
When people become stressed, their bodies can respond by sweating. (2019-10-10)
Anticipating performance can hinder memory
Anticipating your own performance at work or school may hinder your ability to remember what happened before your presentation, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2019-10-03)
Helping pregnant women at work can hurt their chances of returning after maternity leave
When colleagues at work try to lighten a pregnant woman's load, it can hurt her chances of returning to work after giving birth, according to new research from Rice University, the University of Memphis, Boston College and the University of Massachusetts Lowell. (2019-10-02)
Georgia State research finds early life racial discrimination linked to depression, accelerated aging
Early life stress from racial discrimination puts African Americans at greater risk for accelerated aging, a marker for premature development of serious health problems and perhaps a shorter life expectancy, according to a study led by a Georgia State University psychology researcher. (2019-09-30)
Otago study identifies psychology of attraction to religious deities and super-heroes
A new psychological study published by University of Otago, New Zealand, researchers has addressed centuries-old questions about how and why supernatural beings are worshipped. (2019-09-29)
Commit a crime? Loved ones got your back
Reading about a child abuse case or someone burglarizing homes often stirs feelings of disgust, anger and disbelief when it's learned the perpetrator's family or friends did nothing to stop it or report it to police. (2019-09-24)
New study on sharing shows social norms play a role in decision making
A child's desire to share becomes influenced by social norms around the age of 8, new research has revealed. (2019-09-23)
Nonverbal signals can create bias against larger groups
If children are exposed to bias against one person, will they develop a bias against that person's entire group? (2019-09-23)
Low-cost blood pressure drug improves brain function in individuals with autism
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders have discovered a version of the drug known as propranolol could provide cognitive and social benefits for those living with autism spectrum disorder. (2019-09-18)
Heterogeneity in the workplace: 'Diversity is very important to us -- but not in my team'
Diversity in the workplace is highly sought in theory, but often still lacking in practice. (2019-09-12)
Research tracks narcissism from young adulthood to middle age
The belief that one is smarter, better looking, more successful and more deserving than others -- a personality trait known as narcissism -- tends to wane as a person matures, a new study confirms. (2019-09-11)
Poor motor skills predict long-term language impairments for children with autism
Fine motor skills - used for eating, writing and buttoning clothing - may be a strong predictor for identifying whether children with autism are at risk for long-term language disabilities, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2019-09-11)
Study: Action-oriented goals produce higher probability of purchases under tight deadlines
People on a tight deadline have stronger intentions to enact behaviors -- whether it's redeeming a coupon or following through on receiving a flu shot -- immediately after moving than after sitting, says research co-written by U. of. (2019-09-09)
Bad to the bone or just bad behavior?
A new study out of Columbia University suggests that the way we perceive others' bad behavior -- as either biological and innate or potentially changeable -- impacts our willingness to cut them some slack. (2019-09-06)
Why should you care about AI used for hiring?
The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology has published a new white paper that explores the hype and mystique surrounding artificial intelligence in hiring. (2019-09-06)
Hunter-gatherers agree on what is moral, but not who is moral
Social psychologists from the University of Pennsylvania wanted to know whether there was a universal concept of moral character, by looking beyond Western populations. (2019-09-05)
Teen birth control use linked to depression risk in adulthood
Women who used oral contraceptives during adolescence are more likely to develop depression as adults, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia. (2019-08-28)
Even scientists have gender stereotypes ... which can hamper the career of women researchers
However convinced we may be that science is not just for men, the concept of science remains much more strongly associated with masculinity than with femininity in people's minds. (2019-08-26)
Facts and stories: Great stories undermine strong facts
If someone is trying to persuade or influence others, should they use a story or stick to the facts? (2019-08-19)
Adults who mix cannabis with opioids for pain report higher anxiety, depression
Not a good mix: A researcher from the University of Houston has found that adults who combine prescription opioids for severe pain and cannabis report elevated anxiety and depression symptoms, with no increased pain reduction. (2019-08-12)
Health effects of eating marijuana is subject of a new study
Researchers have conducted a study in which mice voluntarily ate a dough containing THC, the primary psychoactive component in marijuana. (2019-08-09)
Liberals and conservatives have different views on equity, but share 'protestant work ethic'
American liberals and conservatives have different views on equity, according to a new study focusing on Moral Foundations Theory, but are not that different from each other when it comes to the 'Protestant work ethic.' (2019-08-07)
'Spin' found in over half of clinical trial abstracts published in top psychiatry journals
'Spin' -- exaggerating the clinical significance of a particular treatment without the statistics to back it up -- is apparent in more than half of clinical trial abstracts published in top psychology and psychiatry journals, finds a review of relevant research in BMJ Evidence Based Medicine. (2019-08-05)
Warning to adults: Children notice everything
Adults are really good at paying attention only to what you tell them to -- but children don't ignore anything. (2019-08-05)
Study casts doubt on evidence for 'gold standard' psychological treatments
Researchers have found 56% percent of 'Empirically Supported Treatments' per the American Psychological Association fare poorly across most metric scores for power and replicability. (2019-08-01)
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