Current Psychology News and Events

Current Psychology News and Events, Psychology News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Being alone and socializing with others each contributes differently to personal growth
Researchers from Bar-Ilan University analyzed self-generated text from more than 1,700 participants who performed a sentence-completion task regarding their experience alone and their social experience when in the company of others. The results showed that a combination of constructive alone and social experiences best contributes to the formation of an integrated self. (2020-11-19)

Be mindful: Study shows mindfulness might not work as you expect
If dispositional mindfulness can teach us anything about how we react to stress, it might be an unexpected lesson on its ineffectiveness at managing stress as it's happening, according to new research from the University at Buffalo. When the goal is ''not to sweat the small stuff,'' mindfulness appears to offer little toward achieving that end. (2020-11-13)

Trust levels in AI predicted by people's relationship style, study shows
A University of Kansas interdisciplinary team led by relationship psychologist Omri Gillath has published a new paper in the journal Computers in Human Behavior showing people's trust in artificial intelligence (AI) is tied to their relationship or attachment style. (2020-10-29)

Lie detection -- Have the experts got it wrong?
Researchers led by the University of Portsmouth carried out a critical analysis of the Model Statement lie detection technique and the results have been published today in the Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling. There are concerns that the use of the technique is dangerous in the pursuit of criminal justice and researchers are calling for an urgent review of its practice. (2020-10-15)

Why some friends make you feel more supported than others
It's good to have friends and family to back you up when you need it - but it's even better if your supporters are close with each other too, a new set of studies suggests. Researchers found that people perceived they had more support from a group of friends or family who all knew and liked each other than from an identical number of close relationships who were not linked. (2020-10-07)

Feline friendly? How to build rap-paw with your cat - new psychology study
A team of psychologists at the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth have discovered a way for humans to bond with cats. (2020-10-07)

Internet gaming youth not more prone to psychiatric disorders
Children who show addiction-like gaming signs are not any more susceptible to mental health problems than their non-gaming peers. Some even experience less anxiety than others. (2020-10-01)

Study shows quizzes improve academic performance
Students who are quizzed over class material at least once a week tend to perform better on midterm and final exams compared to students who did not take quizzes, according to a new Iowa State University meta-analysis. The researchers found in addition to frequency, immediate feedback from instructors also seemed to positively impact student performance. (2020-09-17)

People's life goals relate to their personality type, UC Davis study suggests
A new University of California, Davis, study suggests that for the most part, people formulate goals consistent with their personality traits. (2020-09-16)

People react better to both negative and positive events with more sleep
New research from UBC finds that after a night of shorter sleep, people react more emotionally to stressful events the next day--and they don't find as much joy in the good things. This has important health implications: previous research shows that being unable to maintain positive emotions in the face of stress puts people at risk of inflammation and even an earlier death. (2020-09-15)

Gender harassment and institutional betrayal in high school take toll on mental health
High school students who endure gender harassment in schools that don't respond well enter college and adulthood with potential mental health challenges, according to a University of Oregon study. Researchers found that 97 percent of women and 96 percent of men from a pool of 535 undergraduate college students had endured at least one incident during high school. (2020-09-14)

Experiments reveal why human-like robots elicit uncanny feelings
Experiments reveal a dynamic process that leads to the uncanny valley, with implications for both the design of robots and for understanding how we perceive one another as humans. (2020-09-10)

Children notice race several years before adults want to talk about it
Adults in the United States believe children should be almost 5 years old before talking with them about race, even though some infants are aware of race and preschoolers may have already developed racist beliefs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-08-27)

Why babies not always remember what they have learned
If and how babies recall what they have learned depends on their mood: what they've learned when feeling calm is inaccessible when they're acitive and vice versa. This was shown in a study conducted by developmental psychologists at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) with 96 children aged nine months. They published their report in the journal ''Child Development'' from 19. August 2020. (2020-08-21)

Smartphones are lowering student's grades, study finds
The ease of finding information on the internet is hurting students' long-term retention and resulting in lower grades on exams, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study. (2020-08-18)

Jealous feelings can act as a tool to strengthen friendships
Jealousy can be important for maintaining friendships, which are crucial to physical and emotional health. A study conducted by scientists at Arizona State University, Oklahoma State University, and Hamilton College found feelings of jealousy were sensitive to the value of the friendship and motivated behaviors aimed at keeping friends. (2020-08-11)

Racial discrimination linked to suicide
New research findings from the University of Houston indicate that racial discrimination is so painful that it is linked to the ability to die by suicide, a presumed prerequisite for being able to take one's own life, and certain mental health tools - like reframing an incident - can help. (2020-08-03)

Laughter acts as a stress buffer -- and even smiling helps
People who laugh frequently in their everyday lives may be better equipped to deal with stressful events - although this does not seem to apply to the intensity of laughter. These are the findings reported by a research team from the University of Basel in the journal Plos One. (2020-07-30)

Study highlights mental health risks facing healthcare workers during pandemic
A new study finds healthcare workers in the United States are struggling with a suite of mental-health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study reports healthcare workers are at greater risk than the general public of experiencing health problems such as depression. (2020-07-30)

How women and men forgive infidelity
Men and women react differently to different types of infidelity. But new findings about how we forgive unfaithfulness on the part of our partners surprised researchers. (2020-07-29)

When it comes to happiness, what's love got to do with it?
Researchers from Michigan State University conducted one of the first studies of its kind to quantify the happiness of married, formerly married and single people at the end of their lives to find out just how much love and marriage played into overall well-being. (2020-07-23)

Perceived "whiteness" of Middle Eastern Americans correlates with discrimination
The perceived ''whiteness'' of Americans of Middle Eastern and North African descent is indirectly tied to discrimination against them, and may feed a ''negative cycle'' in which public awareness of discrimination leads to more discrimination, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-07-22)

Researchers identify subject-specific component to perceptual learning ability
Ph.D. candidate YANG Jia and her colleagues, under the guidance of Prof. HUANG Changbing from the Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and LU Zhonglin from New York University (NYU) and NYU Shanghai recently collected and analyzed data from a large sample of subjects in seven visual, auditory and working memory training tasks. (2020-07-21)

Paper: Mundane behavioral decisions, actions can be 'misremembered' as done
Mundane behaviors such as taking a daily medication can eventually create false memories of completing the task, said Dolores Albarracin, a professor of psychology and marketing at Illinois and the director of the Social Action Lab. (2020-07-17)

More than one cognition: A call for change in the field of comparative psychology
In a paper published in the Journal of Intelligence, researchers argue that cognitive studies in comparative psychology often wrongly take an anthropocentric approach, resulting in an over-valuation of human-like abilities and the assumption that cognitive skills cluster in animals as they do in humans. The authors advocate for philosophical and procedural changes to the discipline that would lead to a better understanding of animal minds and the evolution of multiple forms of cognition. (2020-07-14)

Insufficient sleep harms children's mental health
Poor sleep harms children's mental health and emotional stability according to a new study published by University of Houston professor of psychology and director of the Sleep and Anxiety Center of Houston, Candice Alfano. (2020-07-07)

Do we know what we want in a romantic partner? No more than a random stranger would
New research coming out of the University of California, Davis, suggests that people's ideal partner preferences do not reflect any unique personal insight (2020-07-06)

Men more likely than women to be seen as brilliant
Men are more likely than are women to be seen as ''brilliant,'' finds a new study measuring global perceptions linked to gender. The work concludes that these stereotyped views are an instance of implicit bias, revealing automatic associations that people cannot, or at least do not, report holding when asked directly. (2020-07-02)

Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19
Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19. People who are more individualist are less likely to engage, partly due to beliefs in COVID-19 conspiracy theories, and feelings of powerlessness surrounding the pandemic. (2020-06-29)

Bedtime media use linked to less sleep in children who struggle to self-regulate behavior
Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology followed 547 children for a week and measured their media use and sleep patterns. For children who generally struggle to self-regulate their behavior, screen time in the hour before bed was associated with less sleep. Media use in children who scored high on measures of effortful control was not related to less sleep. (2020-06-23)

Women and men still choose partners like they used to
Men and women choose partners according to different criteria. These are the same almost all over the world and have remained unchanged in the last 30 years, according to a new survey of 14 000 people. (2020-06-18)

Intelligence is impacted if born small for gestational age
People born small for gestational age (SGA) have a lower IQ throughout development, however the differences in IQ to those born appropriate for gestational age (AGA) reduce by adulthood. The effects of SGA on IQ are nearly as large as being born into lower socio-economic status or receiving poor parenting in infancy. (2020-06-15)

Research delves into causes of nightmares that shadow female survivors of sexual trauma
A new study from psychologists at the University of Kansas attempts to shed light on triggers of post-trauma nightmare occurrences -- a topic that has received scant study. (2020-06-15)

Elite gamers share mental toughness with top athletes, study finds
In one of the first studies to investigate mental toughness and stress and coping in high performing esports athletes, researchers have found similarities to traditional elite athletes. (2020-06-11)

Sounds of sickness: Perceptions of coughs, sneezes not diagnosed accurately
You're standing in the store's check-out line, and the customer behind you viciously coughs. (2020-06-10)

Understanding the role of cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in brain health
Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that brain chemistry is sensitive to fitness and body composition. (2020-06-02)

UTEP study examines COVID-19 stress, coping strategies, and well-being
Emre Umucu, Ph.D., assistant professor of rehabilitation counseling, and Beatrice Lee, an incoming rehabilitation counseling faculty member, examined the perceived stress levels and coping mechanisms related to COVID-19, and how coping affects well-being in people with self-reported chronic conditions and disabilities. (2020-05-29)

An analysis of psychological meta-analyses reveals a reproducibility problem
Meta-analysis research studies in psychology aren't always reproducible due to a lack of transparency of reporting in the meta-analysis process, according to a new study published May 27, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Esther Maassen of Tilburg University, the Netherlands, and colleagues. (2020-05-27)

Study on body posture: Can powerful poses improve self-confidence in children?
A dominant body posture may help children to feel more confident in school. These are the findings of a new study by psychologists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and the Otto Friedrich University of Bamberg. The study was recently published in the journal 'School Psychology International' and provides initial evidence that simple poses can help students feel better at school. (2020-05-18)

VCU study finds that many published psychology experiments lack evidence of validity
An examination of nearly 350 published psychological experiments found that nearly half failed to show that they were based on a valid foundation of empirical evidence, suggesting that a wide swath of psychological science is based on an 'untested foundation.' (2020-04-30)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.