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Current Psychology News and Events, Psychology News Articles.
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Jealous feelings can act as a tool to strengthen friendships
Jealousy can be important for maintaining friendships, which are crucial to physical and emotional health. (2020-08-11)
Racial discrimination linked to suicide
New research findings from the University of Houston indicate that racial discrimination is so painful that it is linked to the ability to die by suicide, a presumed prerequisite for being able to take one's own life, and certain mental health tools - like reframing an incident - can help. (2020-08-03)
Laughter acts as a stress buffer -- and even smiling helps
People who laugh frequently in their everyday lives may be better equipped to deal with stressful events - although this does not seem to apply to the intensity of laughter. (2020-07-30)
Study highlights mental health risks facing healthcare workers during pandemic
A new study finds healthcare workers in the United States are struggling with a suite of mental-health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-07-30)
How women and men forgive infidelity
Men and women react differently to different types of infidelity. (2020-07-29)
When it comes to happiness, what's love got to do with it?
Researchers from Michigan State University conducted one of the first studies of its kind to quantify the happiness of married, formerly married and single people at the end of their lives to find out just how much love and marriage played into overall well-being. (2020-07-23)
Perceived "whiteness" of Middle Eastern Americans correlates with discrimination
The perceived ''whiteness'' of Americans of Middle Eastern and North African descent is indirectly tied to discrimination against them, and may feed a ''negative cycle'' in which public awareness of discrimination leads to more discrimination, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-07-22)
Researchers identify subject-specific component to perceptual learning ability
Ph.D. candidate YANG Jia and her colleagues, under the guidance of Prof. (2020-07-21)
Paper: Mundane behavioral decisions, actions can be 'misremembered' as done
Mundane behaviors such as taking a daily medication can eventually create false memories of completing the task, said Dolores Albarracin, a professor of psychology and marketing at Illinois and the director of the Social Action Lab. (2020-07-17)
More than one cognition: A call for change in the field of comparative psychology
In a paper published in the Journal of Intelligence, researchers argue that cognitive studies in comparative psychology often wrongly take an anthropocentric approach, resulting in an over-valuation of human-like abilities and the assumption that cognitive skills cluster in animals as they do in humans. (2020-07-14)
Insufficient sleep harms children's mental health
Poor sleep harms children's mental health and emotional stability according to a new study published by University of Houston professor of psychology and director of the Sleep and Anxiety Center of Houston, Candice Alfano. (2020-07-07)
Do we know what we want in a romantic partner? No more than a random stranger would
New research coming out of the University of California, Davis, suggests that people's ideal partner preferences do not reflect any unique personal insight (2020-07-06)
Men more likely than women to be seen as brilliant
Men are more likely than are women to be seen as ''brilliant,'' finds a new study measuring global perceptions linked to gender. (2020-07-02)
Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19
Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19. (2020-06-29)
Bedtime media use linked to less sleep in children who struggle to self-regulate behavior
Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology followed 547 children for a week and measured their media use and sleep patterns. (2020-06-23)
Women and men still choose partners like they used to
Men and women choose partners according to different criteria. These are the same almost all over the world and have remained unchanged in the last 30 years, according to a new survey of 14 000 people. (2020-06-18)
Intelligence is impacted if born small for gestational age
People born small for gestational age (SGA) have a lower IQ throughout development, however the differences in IQ to those born appropriate for gestational age (AGA) reduce by adulthood. (2020-06-15)
Research delves into causes of nightmares that shadow female survivors of sexual trauma
A new study from psychologists at the University of Kansas attempts to shed light on triggers of post-trauma nightmare occurrences -- a topic that has received scant study. (2020-06-15)
Elite gamers share mental toughness with top athletes, study finds
In one of the first studies to investigate mental toughness and stress and coping in high performing esports athletes, researchers have found similarities to traditional elite athletes. (2020-06-11)
Sounds of sickness: Perceptions of coughs, sneezes not diagnosed accurately
You're standing in the store's check-out line, and the customer behind you viciously coughs. (2020-06-10)
Understanding the role of cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in brain health
Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that brain chemistry is sensitive to fitness and body composition. (2020-06-02)
UTEP study examines COVID-19 stress, coping strategies, and well-being
Emre Umucu, Ph.D., assistant professor of rehabilitation counseling, and Beatrice Lee, an incoming rehabilitation counseling faculty member, examined the perceived stress levels and coping mechanisms related to COVID-19, and how coping affects well-being in people with self-reported chronic conditions and disabilities. (2020-05-29)
An analysis of psychological meta-analyses reveals a reproducibility problem
Meta-analysis research studies in psychology aren't always reproducible due to a lack of transparency of reporting in the meta-analysis process, according to a new study published May 27, 2020, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Esther Maassen of Tilburg University, the Netherlands, and colleagues. (2020-05-27)
Study on body posture: Can powerful poses improve self-confidence in children?
A dominant body posture may help children to feel more confident in school. (2020-05-18)
VCU study finds that many published psychology experiments lack evidence of validity
An examination of nearly 350 published psychological experiments found that nearly half failed to show that they were based on a valid foundation of empirical evidence, suggesting that a wide swath of psychological science is based on an 'untested foundation.' (2020-04-30)
Children who hold 'benevolent' sexist views are also likely to possess 'hostile' ones
Children who hold seemingly positive, 'benevolent' views about women are also likely to hold negative ones, a team of psychology researchers has found. (2020-04-23)
The downside of feeling prepared
Feeling prepared and confident about a job interview you have tomorrow is great. (2020-04-22)
Views on guns and death penalty are linked to harsh treatment of immigrants
An online study that pulled equally from people who identify as Democrats or Republicans has found subtle new clues that underlie the dehumanization of immigrants. (2020-04-22)
Face up to eating disorders, and seek help
A new study has found young people are leaving it 'too late' to seek help for eating disorders, citing fear of losing control over their eating or weight, denial, and failure to perceive the severity of the illness as reasons not to get professional advice. (2020-04-15)
Money can't buy love -- or friendship
While researchers have suggested that individuals who base their self-worth on their financial success often feel lonely in everyday life, a newly published study by the University at Buffalo and Harvard Business School has taken initial steps to better understand why this link exists. (2020-04-09)
False memories of crime appear real when retold to others
People are no better than chance at identifying when someone else is recounting a false or real memory of a crime, according to a new UCL study published in Frontiers in Psychology. (2020-04-08)
Anterior insula activation restores prosocial behavior in animal model of opioid addiction
Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology have shown that chemogenetic activation of the anterior insula restores prosocial behavior in an animal model of opioid addiction and empathy. (2020-04-03)
Most people consider becoming vegetarian for their health
Researchers know that people are motivated to be vegetarian for different reasons -- the most common in western cultures being health, the environment and animal rights. (2020-04-02)
Not finding new goals post-retirement associated with greater cognitive decline
Certain middle-aged and older adults, especially women who tend to disengage from difficult tasks and goals after they retire, may be at greater risk of cognitive decline as they age, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-03-16)
Kids who blame themselves for mom's sadness are more likely to face depression and anxiety
'Even if she doesn't say it, I know it's my fault that my mother gets sad.' Kids who believe comments like this -- assuming blame for their mom's sadness or depression -- are more likely to face depression and anxiety themselves, a new study led by SMU has found. (2020-03-11)
When older people feel excluded at work
Employees over 50 can feel excluded and demotivated in the workplace for various reasons. (2020-03-05)
Weight-based bullying linked to increased adolescent alcohol, marijuana us
Adolescents who are bullied about their weight or body shape may be more likely to use alcohol or marijuana than those who are not bullied, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-02-25)
Study highlights new strategies for helping children process negative emotions
A recent study of indigenous people in southern Chile challenges Western assumptions about children's emotional capabilities and highlights the value of spending time outdoors to help children regulate their emotions. (2020-02-20)
Big ideas in performance management 2.0
Industrial-era performance management paradigms and practices are outdated and ineffective in the modern VUCA work environment. (2020-02-19)
Smelling your lover's shirt could improve your sleep
The scent of a romantic partner can improve sleep, suggests new psychology research from the University of British Columbia. (2020-02-13)
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